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Senior thesis examples.

Graduating seniors in Biological Sciences have the option of submitting a senior thesis for consideration for Honors and Research Prizes .  Below are some examples of particularly outstanding theses from recent years (pdf):

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bachelor thesis biology example

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Mechanisms of pericentromeric crossover inhibition , development of high throughput metabolomics to aid the synthetic biology 'design-build-test-learn' cycle , improving monoclonal antibody production from chinese hamster ovary cells , enhancing glycosylated triterpenoid production in saccharomyces cerevisiae , biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles for use in anti-corrosion and anti-fouling agents , exploring s-nitrosoglutathione reductase function in the non-vascular plant, marchantia polymorpha , bioengineering inducible gene expression in leafy brassicas to address post-harvest-specific requirements , sex determination, sex chromosomes, and supergenes: evolution of an unusual reproductive system , super-resolution imaging of proteins in live cells using reversibly interacting peptide pairs , understanding the role and function of spocd1 in pirna-directed de novo dna methylation , sequencing b cell receptor repertoires in human disease: applications in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and in experimental malaria infection , role of tyrosine phosphatase ptpn22 in ctl responses to tumours and t cell exhaustion , rna editing ligases as novel drug targets in trypanosomatid parasites , pifs as a novel target in soybean to modulate the shade avoidance syndrome , structure and function of microtubule nucleation proteins , evaluation of the structural, functional, cellular and molecular basis of heart pathophysiology in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy , understanding and utilising bacterial growth rate changes at high external osmolarities , origin and maintenance of diversity in british euphrasia (orobanchaceae) , single-cell time-series analysis of metabolic rhythms in yeast , ectopic heterochromatin provides an alternative route to fungal resistance .

bachelor thesis biology example

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  • Thesis Guidelines

A thesis for Distinction in Biology is a wonderful way for you to close the loop on your undergraduate research experience and showcase your scientific scholarship. Your thesis will be evaluated by the Faculty in Biology and answers the following questions: What did you do? Why did you do it? What is the significance of your results? What else would you do, were you to continue the project?

In answering the above questions, you have an opportunity to demonstrate your understanding and intellectual ownership of a project; not simply your productivity in the lab. The volume of results or completeness of the study is not critical for a successful thesis. Instead, we will be looking for the following:

  • An argument for the significance of your research, contextualized within the scientific literature;
  • A review of appropriate literature as evidence in support of claims you make in your argument;
  • A statement of your research goals, i.e., a meaningful question of biological importance;
  • A description of experimental approaches and methods ;
  • Appropriate presentation of results through tables, figures, and images;
  • A discussion of the meaning and significance of your results;
  • A description of limitations and future directions for the project.

Expanded guidelines can be found in the Biology Thesis Assessment Protocol (BioTAP):

Format of the Thesis

The basic format of the thesis should resemble that of any scientific journal article that is common in your subdiscipline. It generally includes the following sections: Introduction & Background; Methods; Results; Discussion; Acknowledgements; and References. In some instances, it may be useful to sub-divide the Methods & Results section to correspond to multiple aims. However, if you chose to take this route, remember that there should still be a general Introduction and Discussion sections that address the project as a whole. The thesis should not consist of several "mini-papers" that are unconnected.  

Submission Guidelines

The format of the final copy should follow these guidelines:

  • Cover Page ( sample ): Title; student's name; supervisor's name; date of submission; 3 signature lines at bottom right (Research Supervisor, DUS, Reader). Please follow the format and language of the sample.
  • Abstract Page: single-spaced, roughly 250 words.
  • Thesis should be double-spaced
  • Pages should be numbered at the top right corner of the page
  • It is preferred that figures are embedded within the document instead of all at the end
  • There is no minimum page requirement or limit, although most are approximately 25 pages. 

Sample Theses

Examples of Distinction papers from previous years are available for examination in the Undergraduate Studies Office (Rm 135 BioSci).  Several samples are also available below as PDF files.

  • Tracing the origins of antimalarial resistance in Plasmodium vivax
  • Interaction network optimization improves the antimicrobial efficacy of phage cocktails
  • Identifying how ufmylation of RAB1B regulates IFN-β signaling

Additional Resources

  • Library Resources for Students Writing Theses
  • How to write and publish a scientific paper by Barbara Gastel and Robert A. Day
  • Biology 495(S): Scientific Argument in Writing . This course is particularly appropriate for seniors working on an undergraduate thesis or major research paper and is recommended, although not required, for all candidates for Graduation with Distinction in biology. The course is writing intensive and carries a “W” designation and, in the fall semester only, is a seminar and carries an “S” designation.
  • Biology Writes  offers writing resources, feedback, one-on-one consultations, and more.  
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Digital Commons @ USF > College of Arts and Sciences > Molecular Biosciences > Theses and Dissertations

Molecular Biosciences Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Exploring strain variation and bacteriophage predation in the gut microbiome of Ciona robusta , Celine Grace F. Atkinson

Distinct Nrf2 Signaling Thresholds Mediate Lung Tumor Initiation and Progression , Janine M. DeBlasi

Thermodynamic frustration of TAD2 and PRR contribute to autoinhibition of p53 , Emily Gregory

Utilization of Detonation Nanodiamonds: Nanocarrier for Gene Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer , Allan E. Gutierrez

Role of HLA-DRB1 Fucosylation in Anti-Melanoma Immunity , Daniel K. Lester

Targeting BET Proteins Downregulates miR-33a To Promote Synergy with PIM Inhibitors in CMML , Christopher T. Letson

Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis by M82 Peptidases: The Role of PrsS in the Staphylococcus aureus Stress Response , Baylie M. Schott

Histone Deacetylase 8 is a Novel Therapeutic Target for Mantle Cell Lymphoma and Preserves Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxic Function , January M. Watters

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Regulation of the Heat Shock Response via Lysine Acetyltransferase CBP-1 and in Neurodegenerative Disease in Caenorhabditis elegans , Lindsey N. Barrett

Determining the Role of Dendritic Cells During Response to Treatment with Paclitaxel/Anti-TIM-3 , Alycia Gardner

Cell-free DNA Methylation Signatures in Cancer Detection and Classification , Jinyong Huang

The Role Of Eicosanoid Metabolism in Mammalian Wound Healing and Inflammation , Kenneth D. Maus

A Holistic Investigation of Acidosis in Breast Cancer , Bryce Ordway

Characterizing the Impact of Postharvest Temperature Stress on Polyphenol Profiles of Red and White-Fruited Strawberry Cultivars , Alyssa N. Smith

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Multifaceted Approach to Understanding Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation and Drug Resistance , Jessie L. Allen

Cellular And Molecular Alterations Associated with Ovarian and Renal Cancer Pathophysiology , Ravneet Kaur Chhabra

Ecology and diversity of boletes of the southeastern United States , Arian Farid

CircREV1 Expression in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer , Meagan P. Horton

Microbial Dark Matter: Culturing the Uncultured in Search of Novel Chemotaxonomy , Sarah J. Kennedy

The Multifaceted Role of CCAR-1 in the Alternative Splicing and Germline Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans , Doreen Ikhuva Lugano

Unraveling the Role of Novel G5 Peptidase Family Proteins in Virulence and Cell Envelope Biogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus , Stephanie M. Marroquin

Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding Protein 2 Alternative Splicing Regulates HIF1α During Chronic Hypoxia , Emily M. Mayo

Transcriptomic and Functional Investigation of Bacterial Biofilm Formation , Brooke R. Nemec

A Functional Characterization of the Omega (ω) subunit of RNA Polymerase in Staphylococcus aureus , Shrushti B. Patil

The Role Of Cpeb2 Alternative Splicing In TNBC Metastasis , Shaun C. Stevens

Screening Next-generation Fluorine-19 Probe and Preparation of Yeast-derived G Proteins for GPCR Conformation and Dynamics Study , Wenjie Zhao

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Understanding the Role of Cereblon in Hematopoiesis Through Structural and Functional Analyses , Afua Adutwumwa Akuffo

To Mid-cell and Beyond: Characterizing the Roles of GpsB and YpsA in Cell Division Regulation in Gram-positive Bacteria , Robert S. Brzozowski

Spatiotemporal Changes of Microbial Community Assemblages and Functions in the Subsurface , Madison C. Davis

New Mechanisms That Regulate DNA Double-Strand Break-Induced Gene Silencing and Genome Integrity , Dante Francis DeAscanis

Regulation of the Heat Shock Response and HSF-1 Nuclear Stress Bodies in C. elegans , Andrew Deonarine

New Mechanisms that Control FACT Histone Chaperone and Transcription-mediated Genome Stability , Angelo Vincenzo de Vivo Diaz

Targeting the ESKAPE Pathogens by Botanical and Microbial Approaches , Emily Dilandro

Succession in native groundwater microbial communities in response to effluent wastewater , Chelsea M. Dinon

Role of ceramide-1 phosphate in regulation of sphingolipid and eicosanoid metabolism in lung epithelial cells , Brittany A. Dudley

Allosteric Control of Proteins: New Methods and Mechanisms , Nalvi Duro

Microbial Community Structures in Three Bahamian Blue Holes , Meghan J. Gordon

A Novel Intramolecular Interaction in P53 , Fan He

The Impact of Myeloid-Mediated Co-Stimulation and Immunosuppression on the Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Adoptive T cell Therapy , Pasquale Patrick Innamarato

Investigating Mechanisms of Immune Suppression Secondary to an Inflammatory Microenvironment , Wendy Michelle Kandell

Posttranslational Modification and Protein Disorder Regulate Protein-Protein Interactions and DNA Binding Specificity of p53 , Robin Levy

Mechanistic and Translational Studies on Skeletal Malignancies , Jeremy McGuire

Novel Long Non-Coding RNA CDLINC Promotes NSCLC Progression , Christina J. Moss

Genome Maintenance Roles of Polycomb Transcriptional Repressors BMI1 and RNF2 , Anthony Richard Sanchez IV

The Ecology and Conservation of an Urban Karst Subterranean Estuary , Robert J. Scharping

Biological and Proteomic Characterization of Cornus officinalis on Human 1.1B4 Pancreatic β Cells: Exploring Use for T1D Interventional Application , Arielle E. Tawfik

Evaluation of Aging and Genetic Mutation Variants on Tauopathy , Amber M. Tetlow

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Investigating the Proteinaceous Regulome of the Acinetobacter baumannii , Leila G. Casella

Functional Characterization of the Ovarian Tumor Domain Deubiquitinating Enzyme 6B , Jasmin M. D'Andrea

Integrated Molecular Characterization of Lung Adenocarcinoma with Implications for Immunotherapy , Nicholas T. Gimbrone

The Role of Secreted Proteases in Regulating Disease Progression in Staphylococcus aureus , Brittney D. Gimza

Advanced Proteomic and Epigenetic Characterization of Ethanol-Induced Microglial Activation , Jennifer Guergues Guergues

Understanding immunometabolic and suppressive factors that impact cancer development , Rebecca Swearingen Hesterberg

Biochemical and Proteomic Approaches to Determine the Impact Level of Each Step of the Supply Chain on Tomato Fruit Quality , Robert T. Madden

Enhancing Immunotherapeutic Interventions for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia , Kamira K. Maharaj

Characterization of the Autophagic-Iron Axis in the Pathophysiology of Endometriosis and Epithelial Ovarian Cancers , Stephanie Rockfield

Understanding the Influence of the Cancer Microenvironment on Metabolism and Metastasis , Shonagh Russell

Modeling of Interaction of Ions with Ether- and Ester-linked Phospholipids , Matthew W. Saunders

Novel Insights into the Multifaceted Roles of BLM in the Maintenance of Genome Stability , Vivek M. Shastri

Conserved glycine residues control transient helicity and disorder in the cold regulated protein, Cor15a , Oluwakemi Sowemimo

A Novel Cytokine Response Modulatory Function of MEK Inhibitors Mediates Therapeutic Efficacy , Mengyu Xie

Novel Strategies on Characterizing Biologically Specific Protein-protein Interaction Networks , Bi Zhao

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Characterization of the Transcriptional Elongation Factor ELL3 in B cells and Its Role in B-cell Lymphoma Proliferation and Survival , Lou-Ella M.m. Alexander

Identification of Regulatory miRNAs Associated with Ethanol-Induced Microglial Activation Using Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic Approaches , Brandi Jo Cook

Molecular Phylogenetics of Floridian Boletes , Arian Farid

MYC Distant Enhancers Underlie Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility at the 8q24.21 Locus , Anxhela Gjyshi Gustafson

Quantitative Proteomics to Support Translational Cancer Research , Melissa Hoffman

A Systems Chemical Biology Approach for Dissecting Differential Molecular Mechanisms of Action of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer , Natalia Junqueira Sumi

Investigating the Roles of Fucosylation and Calcium Signaling in Melanoma Invasion , Tyler S. Keeley

Synthesis, Oxidation, and Distribution of Polyphenols in Strawberry Fruit During Cold Storage , Katrina E. Kelly

Investigation of Alcohol-Induced Changes in Hepatic Histone Modifications Using Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomics , Crystina Leah Kriss

Off-Target Based Drug Repurposing Using Systems Pharmacology , Brent M. Kuenzi

Investigation of Anemarrhena asphodeloides and its Constituent Timosaponin-AIII as Novel, Naturally Derived Adjunctive Therapeutics for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer , Catherine B. MarElia

The Role of Phosphohistidine Phosphatase 1 in Ethanol-induced Liver Injury , Daniel Richard Martin

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Changing the Pathobiological Paradigm in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: The NLRP3 Inflammasome Drives the MDS Phenotype , Ashley Basiorka

Modeling of Dynamic Allostery in Proteins Enabled by Machine Learning , Mohsen Botlani-Esfahani

Uncovering Transcriptional Activators and Targets of HSF-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans , Jessica Brunquell

The Role of Sgs1 and Exo1 in the Maintenance of Genome Stability. , Lillian Campos-Doerfler

Mechanisms of IKBKE Activation in Cancer , Sridevi Challa

Discovering Antibacterial and Anti-Resistance Agents Targeting Multi-Drug Resistant ESKAPE Pathogens , Renee Fleeman

Functional Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Bone Metastatic Prostate Cancer , Jeremy S. Frieling

Disorder Levels of c-Myb Transactivation Domain Regulate its Binding Affinity to the KIX Domain of CREB Binding Protein , Anusha Poosapati

Role of Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1 in Ovarian Cancer Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Drug Sensitivity , Chase David Powell

Cell Division Regulation in Staphylococcus aureus , Catherine M. Spanoudis

A Novel Approach to the Discovery of Natural Products From Actinobacteria , Rahmy Tawfik

Non-classical regulators in Staphylococcus aureus , Andy Weiss

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

In Vitro and In Vivo Antioxidant Capacity of Synthetic and Natural Polyphenolic Compounds Identified from Strawberry and Fruit Juices , Marvin Abountiolas

Quantitative Proteomic Investigation of Disease Models of Type 2 Diabetes , Mark Gabriel Athanason

CMG Helicase Assembly and Activation: Regulation by c-Myc through Chromatin Decondensation and Novel Therapeutic Avenues for Cancer Treatment , Victoria Bryant

Computational Modeling of Allosteric Stimulation of Nipah Virus Host Binding Protein , Priyanka Dutta

Cell Cycle Arrest by TGFß1 is Dependent on the Inhibition of CMG Helicase Assembly and Activation , Brook Samuel Nepon-Sixt

Gene Expression Profiling and the Role of HSF1 in Ovarian Cancer in 3D Spheroid Models , Trillitye Paullin

VDR-RIPK1 Interaction and its Implications in Cell Death and Cancer Intervention , Waise Quarni

Regulation of nAChRs and Stemness by Nicotine and E-cigarettes in NSCLC , Courtney Schaal

Targeting Histone Deacetylases in Melanoma and T-cells to Improve Cancer Immunotherapy , Andressa Sodre De Castro Laino

Nonreplicative DNA Helicases Involved in Maintaining Genome Stability , Salahuddin Syed

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Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2022-2023

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23 catalog results, online 1. a predictive model of human transcriptional activators and repressors [2023].

  • Liongson, Ivan (Author)
  • May 4, 2023

Online 2. A Representative Role for the Alternative Splicing of Synaptic Genes [2023]

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Online 3. Building a B Cell Differentiation Model for X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Using Pluripotent Stem Cells [2023]

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  • May 5, 2023

Online 4. Dissecting the Parasympathetic Neural Circuits of the Heart [2023]

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Online 5. Early Life Stress Moderates the Relation Between Inflammation and Nucleus Accumbens Gray Matter Volume in Adolescents [2023]

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Online 6. Identification of DNA Termini in Sequencing Data through Combined Analysis of End Capture and Local Strand Bias [2023]

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Online 7. Identifying Endocrine Bases of Parental Neglect and Infanticide in the Mimic Poison Frog [2023]

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Online 8. Injectable Biomimetic Hydrogels Providing Prolonged Delivery of GLP-1 Analogues for Enhanced Diabetes Treatment [2023]

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Online 9. Internalization of anti-GD2 antibodies as a key component of the antibody-induced cell death mechanism in pediatric neuroblastoma [2023]

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Online 10. Investigating impacts of heat stress on symbiosis in cnidarian larvae using high-throughput fluorescence-based quantification [2023]

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Online 11. Mechanisms of Ferroptosis Evasion Promoted by Extracellular Metabolites [2023]

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Online 12. Morphological Analysis of Axo-Axonic Cell Variability [2023]

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Online 13. Mosquitoes in the Anthropocene: A Multi-Decade Study at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve [2023]

  • Dutta Gupta, Tanvi (Author)

Online 14. Propagule size has context-dependent effects on colonization success in mixtures of gut microbial communities [2023]

  • Goldman, Doran (Author)

Online 15. Spatiotemporal gene expression mapping of brain aging in mice [2023]

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Online 16. Specific extrusion of Enterovirus-A71-infected cells from human colonoids and consequences for viral spread [2023]

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Online 17. Stuck in the Matrix- Patch Matrix Dynamics in Florida Scrub [2023]

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Online 18. The Junctional Epithelium Organoid: A Novel System for Periodontitis Research [2023]

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Online 19. Using inducible signaling receptors for in vivo fate determination of hematopoietic stem cells to erythroid-specific lineages [2023]

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Online 20. We Are What We Eat: The Impact of Agricultural Intensity on the Microbiome of Honeybee Guts [2023]

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  • May 17, 2023

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bachelor thesis biology example

How to Tackle Your Bachelor’s or Master’s Thesis in Science* Without Losing Your Mind

* Based on my personal experience in successfully writing a bachelor’s thesis in biology and a master’s thesis in neurosciences in Germany. My view might be biased, but a lot of things probably apply across different fields and borders.

First of all, congrats! You made it! You are currently taking your first step into the direction of independent research. The only thing that is still separating you from your degree is your bachelor’s or master’s thesis work (and maybe some assignments and the last exam). You already heard from other people that stressful times are coming ahead and you are worried that everything will go wrong? It will not! To help you not loose your mind during the process, I put together some tips for you. I was lost in the beginning, too, and as a firstgen I thought I would never be able to find through the jungle and graduate. But here I am, holding a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and currently starting the most scary one so far: the PhD.

The Research Process

The research process of a bachelor’s or master’s thesis itself typically starts with an idea and is followed by a literature research identifying the status quo in the research field, resulting in refinement of the idea and the formation of a research question. Then, adequate methods to answer the question are decided, followed by data collection and analysis. The whole work is then finished off by writing the ‘thesis’.

As a bachelor’s or master’s student, you can technically jump in at any point of this process. Some labs have already decided on a question and the methodology you are going to use because it belongs to an ongoing project. This was for example the case in my bachelor’s thesis. As the bachelor’s thesis at my university needed to be conducted in a time frame of 12 weeks, I was working together with a PhD student collecting data (I was mainly staining brain sections, imaged them, and counted cells!). In my master’s thesis work (duration: 6 months), however, I was allowed to design my own project from beginning to the end and worked independently.

“Es ist noch kein Meister vom Himmel gefallen”

German for: A master has never come falling from heaven.

Lab work can be scary, you can feel like you are not good enough. I still remember how insecure I was on my first day in the lab as a bachelor’s student. I was shaking while pipetting under supervision because I was so nervous and didn’t want to do anything wrong. I thought my supervisor would think I was not made for the lab. But oh boy, was I wrong! No one, and I say NO ONE, expects you to be a perfect scientist already! You are in the process of learning the scientific method and getting trained! It is ok to make mistakes and ask for help, it is part of the learning process and will help you when conducting research in the future! Back then, thanks to great supervision, I gained confidence over time and was rewarded with beautiful immunofluorescence-stained brain sections!

How Do I Start?

1. choose a project you find interesting and a supervisor you feel comfortable with.

BOTH are important. You should choose a project you find interesting, in which you would enjoy working towards answering the research question and reading up on the literature. This will make it way easier to stay motivated. However, you should also be comfortable in your research environment. You will probably spend a lot of time with your supervisor and your supervisor might be the one grading you.

2. Ask for Important Literature and Example Theses

In order to gain a good overview of the field you will conduct your research in it is helpful to read up on literature straight ahead. A good way to do so and not miss the key concepts is to ask your supervisor. They are the expert in the field and can give you the most important papers. From there on you can guide your literature research looking through the names and references and checking related topics. Also, ask which data base (PubMed, WebOfScience, etc.) is commonly used in your field.

Since every university, even every faculty, and every professor has different guidelines and expectations for the thesis, try to get hold of theses from prior bachelor or master students. Often your supervisor or university library can provide them.

3. Create an Outline of Your Thesis

Maybe start out with a mind map. Write down EVERYTHING that comes to your mind when thinking about your topic. Write down what you already know. Write down your questions, which methods you are using. And then, connect the dots . Try to find a ‘red thread’ (= Roten Faden ) that you can weave through your text. Find the story you want to tell and arrange it in an order.

Then, open a word document and create the skeleton of your thesis. Put all headings and subheadings in an order. Start with the most obvious things: Create a space for your cover, the table of contents. Add the title ‘abstract’, introduction, material and methods, results, discussion, and conclusion. Then add subheadings and a few bullet points about what you would like to write about in this section. This way you will already have a document that you can slowly feed with more information. And you will see your pages filling faster, which will give you a boost in motivation.

You don’t need to finish this all in one day. This can be a growing document meanwhile you are working in the lab.

4. Create a Schedule

If you are like me, you will probably still end up working up until the last minute, even if you scheduled everything perfectly and worked accordingly. However, it is definitely important to make a schedule of the whole time-frame of your research project. Schedule your experiments and when you are writing which chapter. Schedule how long the data analysis will probably take. Schedule the proof-reading, corrections, and formatting. Schedule the printing. Leave one- to two weeks extra for emergencies. Also, because it WILL take longer than you initially think. Especially, because you WILL probably be procrastinating at some points. But keep in mind: In case you get sick or something doesn’t work, most universities offer an extension of the deadline.

Also, try to schedule normal workdays for your thesis, include regular breaks, and enjoy time off (Feierabend!) of your thesis, too! This will keep you sane.

Tip: Check out how long copy shops take for printing BEFORE it is time for printing. Also make sure to put away some money, as it can sadly be quite expensive.

5. Invest Time in Learning a Citation Manager

It might take a moment, but will definitely pay off. When working on my bachelor’s thesis I made the mistake to not use one. I had more than 10 pages of references and sorting and formatting them took several days. Days that I could have used for proof-reading, or, finally relaxing for a bit 😉 Some examples are EndNote, Mendeley, Zotero.

Actually, I don’t understand why they don’t teach this in uni…

What to Think About When Writing the Different Parts of Your Thesis

Some general things on writing: don’t try to show off too much. Yes, it is important to use the adequate vocabulary when writing, but don’t make your sentences unnecessarily complicated. On a side note: not everyone is a native English speaker. I’m not. I actually wrote my bachelor’s thesis in German and only my master’s thesis in English. Looking back at it, I would choose to write the bachelor’s thesis in English, too, as it is easier to stick to the specific terms of the field, because most findings are reported in English. Besides, try to write every other day, even if it is just one sentence. Just write down what comes to your mind and directly put the reference next to it. It does not have to be a beautiful sentence. Beautiful sentences get born in the editing process. The flow of your text comes with time. Since we got that sorted now, let’s get to the different parts of your thesis!

Introduction

In this part you want to give an overview of the field of your research. Why is this research important (why important for scientists? why for the general public?)? Is it about a disease? How many people suffer from it? Why should people care? What has been done in this field already? Where are the gaps? Maybe there are controversial results? Typically the introduction ends with the aim/research question that is based on the literature review. How does the aim relate to findings of previous studies? What is the main question? What are the subquestions? With which methods are you going to tackle them?

Tip: As you do your literature research for the introduction, summarize the main findings of the paper already with the reference in form of bullet points and put them in the corresponding chapter of the introduction. This way you will already have a skeleton that you can use for writing. The introduction should have the ‘shape’ of an inverted cone in the end, meaning that you should go from the broader topic to the specific question.

Material and Methods

Here you want to describe the material and methods you have used and why you have used them. Don’t only write down the steps of the protocol you applied, but also write down how the method works and why you used the substances (for example: To remove DNA, an additional DNAse treatment was performed applying DNAsI solved in RDD buffer directly on the column and incubating it for 15 minutes at room temperature).

Don’t forget to explain your analysis

Your results depend on the analysis/statistics you applied, therefore it is crucial to describe the program and the statistical tests you used and WHY they fit your data. What kind of data do you have? What results to you consider as significant (p-value below 0.05?)?

Tip: Write the methods as you apply them in the lab. Since you are basically writing down a protocol, it is a fast way to fill your pages and feel like you already made progress. Also your memory is still fresh. Make sure to write down from which company your substances and programs are.

Describe your results, but don’t interpret them yet. Put the description of a table ABOVE the table and the description of a figure BELOW the figure. The description should be written in a way that one can understand the table/figure without reading the main text. You don’t need to arrange the results in a chronological order, you can also put them in an order that helps you tell your story. This order should be consistent over sections (use the same order in the discussion!). Besides, don’t put too many figures. Put the most important ones that help you tell your story. Any additional figures can be put into the appendix.

This section can naturally feel like it is the most important part of your thesis. A lot of people were stressing out about not having good results or not having the results they wanted. I can assure you: IT DOESN’T MATTER. Experiments do not always work how we wanted it and in such a limited time frame it is totally normal that you might not get ‘good’ results. No one will give you a bad grade for that. The point of your thesis is to show that you understood how scientific research is conducted and how to wrap it up. YOU DON’T NEED TO WIN THE NOBEL PRIZE (if you do tho, congrats!). If you don’t have good results, put more effort into a great discussion and the introduction and you will be fine.

Tip: It can help to arrange your results figures in a PowerPoint first to create your story. Put the numbers to the figures last. Make sure you refer to the correct figures.

Discuss your results based on previous literature/similar studies and your aims. Did you answer your question? Are your data analysed correctly? Were there any problems while running the experiments? Did the problems influence the results? How could one eliminate the problems? How can you apply your results on further research? Write a good conclusion of your findings after the discussion.

Usually the first thing after the table of contents, but often written last. THIS IS PROBABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF YOUR THESIS. It is the part, that everyone will read first. It is there to quickly give an overview of your work and should include a few words about the background, the question, the methods, and the main findings. Try to not exceed one page.

Acknowledgements

You can put these in the beginning (before the table of contents) or the end (before or after literature) of your thesis. They are not only a way of showing your gratitude towards your supervisors, but also a way to state the resources you used for your thesis, such as intellectual input! So maybe also consider including the technical assistant or fellow student that helped you or teached you a new technique.

Make Your Supervisor Your Best Friend

Maybe not literally, but definitely stay in contact, send them the chapters of your thesis for feedback, and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Your supervisor might be the one grading your thesis or writing a recommendation letter for you.

I had weekly meetings with the direct supervisor of my master’s thesis. These were extremely helpful to stay on track, give updates, and receive valuable input. If you are stuck somewhere (e.g. data analysis), your supervisor can help you. Asking for help it is not a sign of weakness. In fact, your supervisor might even get suspicious if you don’t ask for help at all.

But please, also keep in your mind that your supervisors are busy people (they are first of all people!). Don’t expect them to tell you each and every step and plan all the meetings. Do your work and initiate meetings. They will happy to meet with you. Don’t send them your thesis one week before handing in and give them enough time to get back to you.

General Tips for Motivation

Find the right workplace for you. Some people work best in the library, some at home in pajamas (but keep the work out of your bedroom!). Try to incorporate rituals to condition yourself into a working mood. I was for example always lighting a scented candle when working and drinking coffee. I liked to have music or even Netflix in the background. Others prefer it quiet. Try what works for you.

Also, finding yourself a group of other students working on their theses, too, can be very helpful for motivation, but also for helping each other proof reading. Try to update each other regularly.

Accept That You Will Find Typos After Submission

Despite having it proof-read by supervisor and friends, I still had an extra word in the abstract of both my bachelor’s and my master’s thesis. After submission, I noticed several typos. THIS IS NORMAL. After having worked on your thesis for so long, it is hard to notice mistakes. As long as you don’t get stuck in every paragraph, no one will care.

Last but not Least: Make it Pretty!

You shouldn’t underestimate the importance of good formatting. If your thesis looks good to begin with, your examiners will be more pleased to read it (even if it might be subconscious) and vice versa . Try to deep dive a bit into the formatting functions of Word/your writing program (but of course stay also within the guidelines of your university).

Here are some of my suggestions:

  • Use ‘styles’ for your headers and sub-headers. This way they will be already assembled in a hierarchy in the table of contents you are going to add in the end. Additionally, when converting your document into a PDF, you can just click the chapter titles and it will automatically jump to the corresponding section. Keep in mind that your examiner might read your thesis as a PDF 🙂
  • Justify your text .
  • Put conceptual paragraphs within chapters for easier reading.
  • Turn on the non-printable signs to check for double-spaces and returns .
  • Make sure you wrote out each term before you make it an abbreviation. If you created an abbreviation, use it throughout the whole text. If you have a lot of abbreviations, create a table of them.
  • Use margins big enough for binding your printed thesis. The margins in my bachelor’s and master’s thesis were 3cm on both sides.
  • Add a page number and automatically add the name of the chapter in header or footer. This helps orientation when reading the printed version of your thesis. For adding the name of the chapter, create a header. Go to the design tab and choose quick parts > field… A dialog box should pop up. Select Link and references from the drop down list, in field names you choose ‘StyleRef’. Then choose ‘Heading 1’ so you always get the heading of the first level displayed. Click ok. The name of the chapter can only be added automatically if a header style is applied.
  • Use page breaks to arrange your text and figures so they don’t break off in weird places. I for example prefer to have the beginning/heading of the introduction/material and methods/results/discussion always at the top of the page. Also I don’t like it when the figure description is cut off.
  • Use the same color scheme for figures throughout the whole thesis . Be consistent, for example the control group is always blue and the treatment group orange. You can find inspiration for well-fitting colors googling color palettes.
  • Create your own figures. If you have that extra time, definitely invest it in creating ‘your own’ scientific illustration. A great website that makes it very easy in a consistent style is biorender.com .

Take Home Message

Remember, the first version will never be the final one. The beautiful sentences get born in the editing process. You will be stressed, but you will be able to handle it. You are not alone! Ask for help when you need it. I wish you all the best in your process, and hope that your labs find a way to still operate during these difficult times. If you have any further questions, leave a comment.

Remember: YOU CAN DO IT. YOU HAVE COME THIS FAR.

Stay safe. Stina. ❤

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Published by Stina Börchers

Stina Börchers is a German neuroscience PhD student at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She completed her undergrad studies in biology in 2017 and her master's in neurosciences in 2020. Next to studying, Stina blogs about scientific topics, her daily life and experiences as a student here and on instagram. View all posts by Stina Börchers

6 thoughts on “ How to Tackle Your Bachelor’s or Master’s Thesis in Science* Without Losing Your Mind ”

I am currently writing my Master’s thesis. This is incredibly helpful, thank you 🥰

Oh great to hear that! I wish you the best of luck, you are going to nail this! ♥️

Thank you so much ! deffo really helpful and motivating to finally complete my thesis 🙂

Yay! Happy to hear that! Good luck with your thesis! Take care!

Ausgezeichnet, sogar glänzend! 🤠🎷🎼🎶🎶🎶

Thannks for this

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Undergraduate Thesis

The School of Biological Sciences offers a senior thesis option that is available for all students. As part of this experience, students will learn about the proper way to conduct research in a classroom setting, conduct an independent research project, and communicate their results. The thesis, a written description of your work, includes the normal parts of a research paper (introduction, methods, results, figures, discussion and literature references). If you are going on to graduate school, a Senior Thesis is strongly recommended. For students applying to professional schools or even applying for a job, completing a Senior Thesis shows hard work and dedication as it's not required for graduation, but an extra effort you put into your education.

Students would generally complete BSC 196 and 197 during their freshman year, and BSC 204 in their sophomore year prior to registering for BSC 290 or 299 (Research in Biological Sciences, at least 3 hours) in their sophomore or junior years. BSC 303 (Senior Thesis) is taken in the senior year.

Completion of the thesis option is indicated on your transcripts.

A checklist of requirements is available.

Need more information? Contact Dr. Andres Vidal-Gadea

Want to see what a Senior Thesis looks like?  Copies available for viewing in the School of Biological Sciences Office in 210 Julian Hall.

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Major subjects

Biochemistry.

Do histone modifications control gene expression?

Does endotoxin cause or contribute to neurodegenerative diseases?

Molecular interactions of drugs with the allosteric sites of vertebrate Cys-loop receptors

Why do bacteria carry toxin-antitoxin systems?

Aneuploidy in cancer: lessons so far

Big data in genomics and healthcare and how it has defined cancer diagnosis and treatment

Modelling in Biology: accurate descriptions of our pathetic thinking or pathetic descriptions of the real world?

Trace the economic and biological causes of the current antibiotic resistance crisis. Is there a solution and, if so, does it lie in the hands of patients, clinicians, regulators or researchers?

Transposable elements – a powerful force driving evolution

Can the gut microbiota influence host appetite? Implications for the aetiology of obesity

Can vaccine innovation solve the last mile problem for vaccines in low-resource settings

Eradication of Polio: Past Challenges and Future Prospects

Is the age of antibiotics over?

Microbiome regulation of the gut-brain axis: implications for anxiety and depression

On the origin of the bacterial flagellum: an example of irreducible complexity?

Recent advances in the blockade of immune checkpoints in cancer immunotherapy

What are the major causes of delay in response to emerging disease outbreaks: the case of the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa

Pharmacology

Cystic-fibrosis related diabetes

How do SNAREs mediate membrane fusion?

Is CRISPR ready for the clinic?

Phantom pain: a ghost in the machine or a biological basis?

Plant-derived polysaccharides - sweet medicine of tomorrow?

Why are opioids problematic analgesics?

Plant Sciences

"Scrambled Genomes": examining the methodology and goals of the Sc2.0 synthetic genome project

Engineering C4 Rice: Molecular Targets and Progress so far

Is Trehalose-6-phosphate a central regulator of plant carbon partitioning?

Sucrose signalling and its role in plant development

Who needs cells anyway?

Is visual adaptation diminished in autism spectrum disorders?

Memory reconsolidation blockade: a novel treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Parental influence on child language development: does gender matter?

Sleep disorders as model for Consciousness Research: a cognitive framework for parasomnias

The role of genetics in the transgenerational transmission of memories

The role of insulin in cognitive decline in the elderly

Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Adaptations of cancer cells for metastasis to the brain

How and why is the infant gut microbiota affected by caesarean section? The crying need for well-designed research

How do astrocytes support and modulate neuronal function? Exploring neurovascular coupling, neurometabolic coupling, and gliotransmission

The missing nuances of science and society: How popular science is shaping policy and understanding

The role of operant conditioning in spinal cord plasticity and its potential therapeutic implications for spinal cord injury

The significance of proinflammatory mediators in disrupting HRV: a link to cardiovascular morbidity in schizophrenia?

Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour

Prenatal stress: relevance to major depressive disorder

Promises and limitations of a combinatorial approach to spinal cord injury

Social neurons? A critical examination of how individual neurons might implement primate social cognition

The bidirectional relationship between the hippocampus and metabolic syndrome

The Cognitive and Neurobiological Benefits of an Imperfect Memory

Why are drug seeking habits maladaptive?

How have homosexual mating preferences evolved in males and females?

How relevant is the Drosophila segmentation paradigm to the study of segmentation in other arthropods and other animals?

Mechanisms of mass extinction

Migration of Homo erectus out of Africa

The meaning of alarm calls: honesty and deception

Wolves verses Eurasian Lynx as candidates for large predator reintroduction in mainland Britain - which may be the most suitable and why?

Minor subjects

Conservation science.

Causes and remedies for the decline in red squirrel numbers in Britain

How do deer impact forest organisms in UK lowland woodland?

Reintroduction and translocation as conservation tools for rhinos

Translocation as a tool for tiger ( Panthera tigris ) conservation: problems and potential solutions

With respect to myxomatosis and RHD virus how have rabbit populations co-evolved with the viruses and how may rabbit populations be affected in the future?

Development and Psychopathology

To what extent have biasing in screening and diagnosis contributed to the sex ratios observed in autism?

Health, Medicine and Society

Medicalisation and violence against women: implications for the medical encounter

Human Ecology and Behaviour

The use of wood in prehistory

Neural Degeneration and Regeneration

Progress towards establishing lead times of biomarkers for early diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease

The Pharmacological Targeting of the Amyloid-beta pathway in Alzheimer's: issues and prospects

Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine

Dementia: how changing perspectives affect clinical decision making

Should the MMR vaccine be mandatory? The problem of herd immunity threshold

Psychology and Social Issues

Reducing Extremist Violence by increasing Integrative Complexity - why understanding the role of emotion is central to success

Information contacts

For information regarding Major Subjects such as content and timetables, please see the contact details on the Major Subjects webpage .

For information regarding Minor Subjects such as content and timetables, please see the contact details on the Minor Subjects webpage .

For general administration of BBS and general questions which cannot be answered in departments, please contact the Faculty of Biology Office ( [email protected] )

If you wish to move to or from BBS or wish to change Major and/or Minor subject(s), please contact the departments involved AND the Faculty of Biology Office.

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BS Thesis Guidelines and Timeline

Bachelor of science in biological sciences.

Bachelor of Science (BS): The BS is designed for students who wish to delve more deeply into the field of their major through additional electives, participation in scientific research, and completion of a BS thesis that summarizes their research. Successful BS students will (1) learn how scientists design and conduct scientific experiments; (2) collect data as part of a research effort; (3) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of that data; (4) interpret the data in the context of a specific scientific discipline; and (5) describe their work in a BS Thesis

Students can earn a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Biological Sciences in any of the tracks by:

(1) completing three upper-level elective courses in Biological Sciences beyond those required for the BA degree, including  BIOS 28900  Undergraduate Bachelor of Science Research (or both quarters of  BIOS 00296  Undergraduate Honors Research if also pursuing Biology Research Honors)

(2) writing a BS thesis under the supervision of an adviser who is a member of the Biological Sciences Division research faculty.

Guidelines and Timeline for the BS in Biological Sciences

If you are participating in the BSCD honors program or a specialization that requires a thesis, you do not need to prepare a separate proposal (or thesis) for the BS degree, but you should submit copies of these materials to the BS program. Honors and specialization students are required to submit the BS Faculty Consent form in Spring of the 3rd year as directed below. You should adhere to the honors or specialization guidelines as you prepare your proposal, select faculty readers, and write your thesis. BS students who are writing a specialization thesis but are not in the BSCD Honors program are required to register for the BS research course (BIOS 28900) as directed below.

Spring of 2nd year

Declare your major as BA or BS in Biological Sciences. Remember that, in addition to the thesis, a BS requires three upper-level BIOS courses (numbered BIOS 21xxxx through 28xxx) beyond the five required for the BA degree. One of these courses must be BIOS 28900 unless you are taking BIOS 00296 for Research Honors.

Autumn of 3rd year

Start looking for a member of the BSD research faculty to serve as your thesis adviser and start developing ideas for your thesis research.

Description of the BS thesis

BS students will write a thesis based on original research. The topic must be a current issue in Biology, including basic science, medicine, and other applied fields, be described in a compelling thesis proposal, and be supported by a willing and appropriate Mentor. In most cases the thesis will present and analyze primary data collected by the student during their time in a mentor's lab. Students may also conduct critical and novel analysis of existing primary data (e.g., a critique of a healthcare policy such as methadone maintenance, a meta-analysis of recent clinical trials of antidepressants, or an argument against punctuated equilibria based on a fossil collection or genomic data). In either case, the work must be hypothesis driven and present evidence that tests the hypothesis. Topics related to global and public health will be accepted only for majors in the global and public health track. Please contact Chris Andrews if you have questions about the appropriateness of your topic. The thesis should follow the format of a published paper in a target journal appropriate for your topic but should include more extensive literature review and context in the introduction and conclusion.  A typical BS thesis is approximately 30 pages of double-spaced text (not including figures, tables and references).

Spring of 3rd year

To declare your interest in pursuing the BS in Biological Sciences, please submit the BS Faculty Consent Form  by 11:59 PM on Friday of finals week. If you have not already done so, please make sure you have officially declared your major as a BS in Biological Sciences so your college adviser can correctly slot courses into your degree program.

All BS students who will not be registered for BIOS 00296 (Undergraduate Honors Research) must register to take the BS research course (BIOS 28900 Undergraduate BS Research) in Autumn of their 4th year. We will add BIOS 00296 students to the BIOS 28900 Canvas site as unregistered students so they will receive announcements and can submit their materials for the BS degree. BS students who are writing a specialization thesis but are not in the BSCD Honors program are required to register for BIOS 28900.

Summer between 3rd and 4th year

BS students will typically conduct the bulk of their thesis research during this summer.

Autumn of 4th year

Unless you are in the BSCD Honors program and registered for BIOS 00296, make sure you are registered for the BS research course (BIOS 28900, Undergraduate BS Research) and have access to the associated Canvas site. BS students who are writing a specialization thesis but are not in the BSCD Honors program are required to register for the BS research course.

Submit a 1-2 page (single-spaced) thesis proposal (approved by your thesis adviser) as an assignment on the BIOS 28900 Canvas site by the end of Week 1.

Minimally, this proposal should include:

  • the name, e-mail address, and department of your thesis adviser.
  • a working title for your thesis.
  • one introductory paragraph giving the background and rationale for your project.
  • three to five paragraphs outlining your research question, hypotheses, predictions, and proposed methods.
  • a few sentences regarding your proposed research timeline.
  • a list of references cited in the proposal.

Winter of 4th year (by end of quarter)

During finals week , submit the names and e-mail addresses of two faculty readers from BSD research departments (other than your thesis adviser) to review your thesis in the spring. You will submit these names as an assignment on the BIOS 28900 Canvas site.

Spring of 4th year

By 11:59 PM on Friday of Week 4

Submit your thesis to your thesis adviser, who must approve it before you send it to readers for review. You do not need to submit this version of the thesis to the BSCD. This checkpoint allows your adviser to confirm that your thesis is in acceptable shape to send to readers.

By 11:59 PM on Friday of Week 5

Submit your thesis, approved by your thesis adviser, to your two faculty readers, along with the faculty review form (make a copy of the review form to share with readers here ). You should request that these readers return their reviews to you by Wednesday of Week 7 so you have time to respond to their feedback by the final deadline at the end of Week 8.

Between Weeks 7 and 8

In collaboration with your thesis adviser, revise your thesis in accordance with the feedback from your faculty reviewers. Both your thesis adviser and your two readers must sign off on the revisions before your final submission.  

By 11:59 PM on Friday of Week 8 

Submit the final version of the approved thesis, with confirmation of approval by your thesis adviser and two additional readers. You may collect signatures on a cover page ( here's the TEMPLATE)  or ask your adviser and readers to provide confirmation of approval by email to: [email protected]

Skip to Content

  • Undergraduate
  • Honors Thesis Examples

EBIO student's Honors Thesis submissions from past years are archived here with abstracts from the student's respective papers. Peruse several of the submissions to get a sense of the area's of study our students delve into for their Honors Thesis projects.

Landscape Patterns of Litter Decomposition in Alpine Tundra - H. A. O'Lear and T. R. Seastedt - 1994

Effects of Mobile Tree Islands on Soil Carbon Storage in Tundra Ecosystems - Sheridan J. Pauker and T. R. Seastedt - 1996

Effects of Sequestered Iridoid Glycosides on Prey Choice of the Prairie Wolf Spider,  Lycosa carolinensis  - Demetri Hilario Theodoratus and M. Deane Bowers - 1998

Effects of Soil Nitrogen Reduction on Nonnative Plants in Restored Grasslands - K.J. Reever Morghan & T. R. Seastedt - 1999

Phylogeny of hammerhead sharks (Family Sphyrnidae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear genes -  Douglas D. Lim, Philip Motta, Kyle Mara, Andrew P. Martin - 2010

Beyond immunity: quantifying the efects of host anti-parasite behavior on parasite transmission -  Elizabeth W. Daly & Pieter T. J. Johnson - 2011

Land Use and Wetland Spatial Position Jointly Determine Amphibian Parasite Communities - Richard B. Hartson,  Sarah A. Orlofske,  Vanessa E. Melin,  Robert T. Dillon Jr., and Pieter T. J. Johnson - 2011

Effects of fuels reductions on plant communities and soils in a Piñon-juniper woodland - M.R. Ross, S.C. Castle, N.N. Barger - 2012

Investigating the dispersal routes used by an invasive amphibian, Lithobates catesbeianus , in human-dominated landscapes - Anna C. Peterson & Katherine L. D. Richgels & Pieter T. J. Johnson & Valerie J. McKenzie - 2012

Incorporation of an Introduced Weed into the Diet of a Native Butterfly: Consequences for Preference, Performance and Chemical Defense - Angela Knerl & M. Deane Bowers 

Quantifying the biomass of parasites to understand their role in aquatic communities - Jason Lambden & Pieter T. J. Johnson - 2013

Conceptual Revision and Synthesis of Proximate Factors Associated with Age-Related Improvement in Reproduction - Rachel J Bradley & Rebecca J. Safran - 2014

Patterns and ecological predictors of age-related performance in female North American barn swallows,  Hirundo rustica erythrogaster    -  R. J. Bradley & J. K. Hubbard & B. R. Jenkins & R. J. Safran - 2014

Wustenberg - Honors Thesis

Assessing The Harmful Impacts Of Increased Commercial Shipping On Arctic Marine Mammals: A Systematic Literature Review - Hayley Wuestenberg - 2021

June 27, 2021

Read more about Assessing The Harmful Impacts Of Increased Commercial Shipping On Arctic Marine Mammals: A Systematic Literature Review - Hayley Wuestenberg - 2021

Mulligan - Honors Thesis

Harmful Algal Blooms As A Possible Cause Of Late Cretaceous Vertebrate Mortality Events In Northwestern Madagascar - Christopher Mulligan - 2021

Read more about Harmful Algal Blooms As A Possible Cause Of Late Cretaceous Vertebrate Mortality Events In Northwestern Madagascar - Christopher Mulligan - 2021

Horan - Honors Thesis

Population Structure Of The Endangered Mud Shrimp Upogebia Pugettensis - Madeleine Horan - 2021

Read more about Population Structure Of The Endangered Mud Shrimp Upogebia Pugettensis - Madeleine Horan - 2021

Heffernan - Honors Thesis

Exploring The Biogeographic Relationship Between Variation In Parasites And Pathogens And Host Plant Dispersal Traits - Patrick Heffernan - 2021

Read more about Exploring The Biogeographic Relationship Between Variation In Parasites And Pathogens And Host Plant Dispersal Traits - Patrick Heffernan - 2021

Girard - Honors Thesis

Flowering Time And Related Genes In Cannabis - Zachary Girard - 2021

Read more about Flowering Time And Related Genes In Cannabis - Zachary Girard - 2021

Enichen - Honors Thesis

May Physical Activity Ameliorate Symptoms And Comorbidities Associated With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Hiv) Infection? - Elizabeth Enichen - 2021

Read more about May Physical Activity Ameliorate Symptoms And Comorbidities Associated With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Hiv) Infection? - Elizabeth Enichen - 2021

Ding - Honors Thesis

Nest Insulative Capacity Varies Between Chickadee Species But Not Along An Elevation Gradient - Shay Ding - 2021

Read more about Nest Insulative Capacity Varies Between Chickadee Species But Not Along An Elevation Gradient - Shay Ding - 2021

Campbell - Honors Thesis

The Impact Of Early Snowmelt, Warming, And Microtopography On In Situ Geum Rossii Germination Rates In The Alpine - Nyika Campbell - 2021

Read more about The Impact Of Early Snowmelt, Warming, And Microtopography On In Situ Geum Rossii Germination Rates In The Alpine - Nyika Campbell - 2021

Woolner - Honors Thesis

Entomology Education Since 2000: Methods, Outcomes, Challenges, and Suggestions for Practice - Elizabeth Woolner - 2020

Dec. 3, 2020

Read more about Entomology Education Since 2000: Methods, Outcomes, Challenges, and Suggestions for Practice - Elizabeth Woolner - 2020

Ross Thumbnail_Honors Thesis

Loss of Microbial Biodiversity: Implications for Human Health and Food Security - Shannon Ross - 2020

Dec. 2, 2020

Read more about Loss of Microbial Biodiversity: Implications for Human Health and Food Security - Shannon Ross - 2020

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Home > USC Columbia > Medicine, School of > Biomedical Science > Biomedical Science Theses and Dissertations

Biomedical Science Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Gluten Free Diet Ameliorates SI Enteropathy in IGA Deficient Mice , Ryan Albert William Ball

Progressive Neurochemical, Neuroinflammatory and Cognitive Deficits in an Experimental Model of Gulf War Illness , Hannah Elizabeth Burzynski

Effects Of Chronic Stress On Working Memory Are Sex-specific And Age-dependent , Tyler Jamison Cox

Aortopathies: Mechanism of Pathogenesis and Therapy , Mengistu G. Gebere

Leptin, Serotonin, and the Control of Food Intake , Nicholas David Maxwell

Targeting Macrophages in Cancer Models Using Natural Compounds , Sierra Jordan McDonald

Neurodevelopmental and Transient Impacts of Brain Kynurenic Acid Elevation and Sleep-Wake Behavior , Katherine Rentschler

Exploration Into the Relationship Between Colitis and Depression: A Potential Role for the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor , Kasie Lynn Roark

B-Cell-Specific MHCII Promotes Host-Microbiome Symbiosis , Mary Melissa Roland

Cardiac Imaging in Mice With Micro-Computed Tomography: An Assessment , Kyle Porter Stegmann

Impact Of Steroid Receptor And Hormone Manipulation In Skeletal Muscle: Implications For Glucose Metabolism And Insulin Sensitivity In Male Mice , Christian Aaron Unger

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Role of Epigenome in Regulation of Inflammation By AHR Ligands 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin and 6-Formylindolo[3,2-B] Carbazole , Alkeiver Cannon

Neurochemical, Molecular, and Behavioral Effects of Intranasal Insulin , Jennifer Marie Erichsen

Sex Differences and Potential Non-invasive Treatments for Calcific Aortic Valve Disease , Henry Pascal Helms

Decellularization Strategies of Naturally Derived Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering Applications , Julia Elizabeth Hohn

Role of AhR in the Epigenetic Regulation of Immune Cells in Lungs During Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Bryan Latrell Holloman

The Submission of a Section 513(g) Request For Information , Morgan Ashley Lano

Engineering and Optimization of an AAV Based Viral Vector to Limit the In-Vitro Expression of SARS-CoV-2 Spike-Protein , Ronald Anderson Smithwick

In Vitro and in Vivo Studies of Mediator Kinase , Lili Wang

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Role of AhR Ligands in Immune Modulation to Suppress Inflammation Through the Regulation of Microrna and Gut Microbiome , Osama Azeldeen Abdulla

Role of Estrogen in Regulating Diet-Induced Obesity in Females , Ahmed Aladhami

Impact of Acetylcholine on Internal Pathways To Basal Amygdala Pyramidal Neurons , Tyler Daniel Anderson-Sieg

Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Derived Cancers: A Novel Study on Growth and Growth Suppression Utilizing Common Colorectal Cancer Agents , Raymond Kennith Bogdon

Impact of Acetylcholine on Amygdala Network Oscillations , Joshua Xavier Bratsch-Prince

Real Time Neurochemical Analysis of the Brain For Pharmacological Treatments in Mood Disorders And Neurodegeneration , Anna Marie Buchanan

Regulation of Inflammatory Processes by Tryptamine, Cannabidiol and 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin , Nicholas Dopkins

Study of the Effect of B-Cell-Intrinsic Mhcii Antigen Presentation on Germinal Center B Cell Evolution Using The Brainbow Mouse Model , Nia Hall

Mechanism of Therapeutic Efficacy of New Drugs in Glioblastoma , Firas Hameed Khathayer

The Effect of Low Dose Penicillin on Tumor Development in Apc Min/+ Mice , Kinsey Ann Sierra Meggett

Defining the Pathophysiology of Gut Humoral Immunodeficiency , Ahmed Dawood Mohammed

The Role PDE11A4 Signaling and Compartmentalization in Social Behavior , Kaitlyn Pilarzyk

Anatomical Correlates of Age-Related Basal Forebrain Dysfunction , Brandy Lynn Somera

A Novel Model to Study Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Differentiation , Austin N. Worden

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Molecular Mechanisms of Loss of E7 Expression in HPV16 – Transformed Human Keratinocytes , Fadi Farooq Abboodi

17 β-Estradiol and Phytoestrogens Attenuate Apoptotic Cell Death in HIV-1 Tat Exposed Primary Cortical Cultures , Sheila Marie Adams

Helicobacter’s Effects on Colitis/Colon Cancer and the Response to Indole 3-Carbinol , Rasha Raheem Abdulhamza Alkarkoushi

A Comparative Study of Cannabinoids & CB1 Receptor GI Signaling , Haley Kristen Andersen

Expansion Microscopy: A New Approach to Microscopic Evaluation , Ashley Ferri

The Role of Acute and Chronic Neuroinflammation in Depression: Uncovering the Relationship Between Histamine and Serotonin Transmission , Melinda Hersey

The Use of Natural Anthraquinone Emodin as a Primary and Complementary Therapeutic in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer , Alexander-Jacques Theodore Sougiannis

The Effects of Super-Resolution Microscopy on Colocalization Conclusions Previously Made With Diffraction-Limited Systems in the Biomedical Sciences , Madison Emily Yemc

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Role of Epigenome and Microbiome in Cannabinoid and Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases , Zinah Zamil Al-Ghezi

Tissue-Specific Roles of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Ligands in Cardiac Outflow Tract Malformations and Calcific Aortic Valve Disease , Nadia Al-Sammarraie

Role of Epigenetic, Molecular and Cellular Pathways in the Regulation of Inflammation , William James Becker

Neurochemical and Behavioral Outcomes of Intranasal Orexin Administration in Young and Aged Animals , Coleman Blaine Calva

Interdependent Mechanisms of Stress Susceptibility , Julie Elaine Finnell

Astrocyte Sensitivity to Dopamine in Culture and Ex Vivo , Ashley L. Galloway

Three-Dimensional Plasma Cell Survival Microniche in Multiple Myeloma , Katrina A. Harmon

Role of Epigenome and Microbiome in Endocannabinoid-Mediated Regulation of Inflammation During Diet-Induced Obesity , Kathryn Miranda

Epigenetic and Purinergic Regulation of Mast Cells Mediator Release , Zahraa Abdulmohsin Mohammed

Effect of TCDD, an Environmental Contaminant, on Activation of AHR Leading to Induction of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCS) and the Ability of Resveratrol, a Botanical, to Neutralize this Effect , Wurood Hantoosh Neamah

An Anatomical Basis of the Differential Cholinergic Modulation of Valence-Specific Pyramidal Neurons in the Basolateral Amygdala , Nguyen Vu

Analysis of Cellular Interactions Within a Collagen Hydrogel , Austin N. Worden

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Role of Mammary Microenvironment in Promoting Left-Right Differences in Tumor Progression, Metastasis, and Therapeutic Response , Huda Issa Atiya

Enhancements in Alginate Microencapsulation Technology & Impacts on Cell Therapy Development , Marwa Belhaj

Effect Of Resveratrol On The Development Of Eczema , Christopher Carlucci

The Nervous System And Cancers Of The Head And Neck , Christian A. Graves

Turning Up Antitumor Immunity Against Breast Cancer , Johnie Hodge

Exploring Alternative Therapeutic Interventions For The Treatment Of Leigh Syndrome , Stephanie Martin

Regulation Of Prostaglandin D2 And Angiogenesis-Related Factors From Human Skin Mast Cells By Interleukin-6 And Resveratrol , Cody Cody McHale

Advanced Clearing Methods and Imaging Techniques for Optimized Three- Dimensional Reconstruction of Dense Tissues , Caleb A. Padgett

Role Of MIR-489 In HER2 Positive Breast Cancer , Yogin Patel

Operation Of The Leica SP8 Multiphoton Confocal System Using Single Or Multiple Fluorochromes , Amy E. Rowley

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Garlic Inhibits Inflammation during Dengue Infection , Alex R. Hall

Functional Role of the Homeobox Transcription Factor Six1 in Neoplastic Transformation of Human Keratinocytes , Maria Hosseinipour

Individual Differences in Markers of Cholinergic Signaling Correlating to Fear and Extinction Learning , Grace C. Jones

The Role Of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8 In Vascular Disease , Desiree Leach

Succination Impairs Protein Folding and Promotes Chop Stability in the Adipocyte during Diabetes , Allison Manuel

Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor M1’s Impact on Fear Extinction Learning , Joshua R. McElroy

Hemodynamic Regulation Of Cardiac Valve Development , Vinal Menon

The Role Of Inflammation In Atherosclerosis , Fatma Saaoud

Synergism of Quercetin and Sodium Butyrate for Controlling Growth of Glioblastoma , Matthew Alan Taylor

Mast Cells and Lipid Cross-Talk in Skin Inflammation , Piper Alexandra Wedman

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Tumor Suppressor p53 Response To UV Light In Normal Human Keratinocyte Strains From Different Individuals , Fadi Farooq Abboodi

Vitamin D and Stress Fractures in Collegiate and Professional Athletes , Christian Michael Askew

Linking Obesity & Breast Cancer: Role Of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 And High Fat Diet-Induced Inflammation On Mammary Tumorigenesis , Taryn L. Cranford

The Identification Of The Direct And Indirect Pathways Through Which Leptin Facilitates Synaptic Plasticity In The Hippocampus , Catherine Van Doorn

Morphogenic Effects Of Dopamine In Cultured Rat Hippocampal Astrocytes , Ashley L. Galloway

Emodin Regulates Macrophage Polarization: Application In Breast Cancer Treatment , Stephen Iwanowycz

Differences In Resting-State Functional Connectivity Of Chronic Migraine, With And Without Medication Overuse Headache, And The Effectiveness Of Sphenopalatine Ganglion Block As A Treatment For Repairing Dysfunctional Connectivity. , Kaitlin Krebs

Prospective Assessment Of Health Disparities And Injury Risk Factors At Basic Combat Training At Ft. Jackson , Kristin Lescalleet

Transcriptional And Post-Transcriptional Regulation Of NRF2 In The Heart By The Deubiquitinase CYLD , Bryan J. Mathis

Regulation of Chronic and Acute Inflammatory Disease by microRNA and Microbiota , Pegah Mehrpouya-Bahrami

The Effect of Arsenic on Type 2 Diabetes and Inflammation , Kayla Penta

Factors Influencing The Collagen Fiber Angle Distribution in The Mouse Aorta , Shana Roach Watson

The Role of Epidermal Stem/Progenitor-Like Cells In HPV-Mediated Pre-Neoplastic Transformation , Yvon L. Woappi

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Extensive Genome Rearrangements of Caulobacter K31 and Genomic Diversity of type B3 Bacteriophages of Caulobacter Crescentus , Kurt Taylor Ash

Evaluating Muscle Fiber Architecture , Morgan Ashley Flahive

Characterization of STARD4 and STARD6 Proteins in Human Ovarian Tissue and Human Granulosa Cells and Cloning of Human STARD4 Transcripts , Aisha Shaaban

Cannabinoid-mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Immune Functions , Jessica Margaret Sido

The Effect of 3D Collagen Scaffolds on Regulating Cellular Responses , Chad Simmons

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Metformin Arrests Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma Cells , Nadia Al-Sammarraie

Cellular and Biochemical Effects of Sparstolonin B on Endothelial Cells to Inhibit Angiogenesis , Marwa Belhaj

An Evolutionary Perspective on Infectious and Chronic Disease , John Eberth

Status Epilepticus Induced Alterations in Hippocampal Anatomy and Neurotransmission , Denise K. Grosenbaugh

The Cardio-Protective Effects of Substance P in Both Ischemia/Reperfusion and and Short-Term Hypoxia Rat Models , Shaiban Jubair

MUSCARINIC MODULATION OF BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA , Lei Liu

MCP-1 In Colorectal Cancer: Benefits of Exercise , Jamie Lee McClellan

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) mediates immune suppression via modulation of microRNA expression in mice , Martine Menard

Effects of cPLA-2 on the Migration and Proliferation of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and the 2-D Migratory Patterns of Tropomyosin in Femoral and Abdominal Aorta Tissue , Jaimeson Thomas Powell

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Home > ETD > Biology > ETDB_BIO

Biology Bachelor's Theses

Theses/dissertations from 2024 2024.

Screening of enterobacteriaceae among selected cold beverages sold in Quiapo, Manila , Angela Kryztel D. Abrigo, Adrian Benedict E. Ang, Daniel B. Imbuido, Trishanne Louise T. Mendoza, and Charlene Annika B. Pandi

An in silico analysis of the binding affinity of alliin from Allium sativum L. targeting HMGB-1 and IL-6 inflammatory cascade , Rejie May M. Cuabo, Katherine F. Gabia, Alyssa Bianca F. Palaypay, and Glen Andrei R. Roque

Prevalence of foodborne parasites in common street food in Manila , Mary Corinne Dolar Escutin, Matthew Williamson Yao Mendoza, Czarinah Isabelle Ilagan Persia, Angel Nicole Benavides Villanueva, and Krystlelyn Mae Lao Tan

Parasitic contamination in Ipomoea aquatica (water spinach) in Laguna de Bay, Angono, Rizal, Philippines , Godspeed Garcia Feliciano, Uriel Anne Torralba Bumanlag, Andrea Noya Galvez, Anne Ricyl Tagala Kaw, and Mikaela Marie Venturanza Garcia

Relative prevalence of microplastics on mangrove crabs and soil in targeted crab harvesting sites in Luzon , Antonio Miguel C. Imperial, Michaella M. Martinez, and Jehan Ginette O. Tan

Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) contamination in De La Salle University grounds , Marc Carlos Aying Pimentel, Mia Lourdes Angelica P. Carandang, Ma. Gracles S. Dela Rosa, Justine Winna Go, and Aliyah Gynelle A. Viyar

Molecular docking studies on the interaction of the Cryptosporidium parvum proteins, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CpCDPK1), with selected plant compounds , Ivan Gregg O. Samson and Rupert C. Quijano Jr.

Theses/Dissertations from 2023 2023

Developing a dengue risk index using the index for risk management (INFORM) framework at a regional scale in the Philippines , Patricia Denise S. Ang, Nagyeong Heo, and Jan Christine D. Latonio

In silico analysis of isocoumarin compounds targeting lanosterol C-14 α-demethylase and its potential inhibition of ergosterol synthesis in Candida albicans , Gabrielle Vaughn Alyssa Avante, Cayne Ashley D. Dela Cruz, and Miles C. Fernandez

An evaluation between the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory bioactivites of ethnobotanical plants from the lamiaceae family found in the Philippines , Maria Czarina V. Beltran, Ana Maria Noelle O. Domingo, and Ellen Stephanie C. Sy

Methods used by small-scale mangrove crab (Scylla spp.) producers to maintain production during the southwest monsoon season in the Philippines , Jannella L. Bolaños

A meta-analysis on the geographical distribution and prevalence of parasitic nematodes infecting cattle in four top cattle-producing countries of Asia , Elizabeth Paige R. Cagurangan and Miguel Antonio P. Capistrano

A systematic review and correlation of risk factors associated with the occurrence of histoplasmosis in Asian individuals with AIDS , Michaela Bucasas Casingal, Christian Jeofferson Layag Galang, and Marie Yvette Bustamante Villareal

Synthetic biological approaches in PET biodegradation and bioplastic conversion: Current advances and future perspectives , Pearl P. Castillo and Robbie Engelo A. Tinio

Assessing machine learning methods in predicting dengue incidence using climatic factors in Region IV-A (CALABARZON), Philippines , Ian Kevin G. Castro, Nikki Elisha M. Elquiero, and Jericho D. Fradejas

An epidemiological study of COVID-19 in selected barangays in the city of Manila from March 2021 to March 2023 , Pamela P. David and Alea B. Villanueva

Examining the etiologic association between toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia: A comprehensive meta-analysis approach , Bea Ysabelle K. Deblois

A narrative review on wastewater-based epidemiology as a strategy for disease surveillance in the Philippines , Melissa Ellaine V. De Luna, Miriel A. Lacson, Kyle Gabriel R. Santos, Arabella Jannie A. Umali, and John Oliver M. Bagasbas

Cannabis sativa as a possible treatment for alleviating both motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease: A meta-analysis , Lucy R. DeVera and Arcadia Marie Q. Pacaña

A study on the human lymphatic filariasis in selected countries in Southeast Asia: Transmission through migration , Nicolas Marcelle D. Dimaculangan, Therese Marie F. Dinopol, and Media Zofia S. Canlas

Anti-reflective coatings for photovoltaic module efficiency: A bibliometric review , Alistair V. Enhaynes, John Brian F. Anderson, and Jerik Adrian V. Bayon

The relationship between clostridium spp. and the incidence of colorectal cancer: A descriptive review , Louise Nicole C. Escueta

Preliminary assessment of microplastic contamination of fish from a Metro Manila wet market , Dennis Paolo M. Garcia

Virulence-associated genome plasticity of selected clinical candida albicans from a Philippine tertiary hospital , Maria Angelica R. Gerodias

Sequence analysis of antimicrobial resistance genes in staphylococcus aureus in selected Southeast Asian countries , Genevieve D. Giron, Marie Angeli N. Peña, and Therese Amber E. Oconer

Image-assisted assessment of the efficiency of comperiella calauanica as parasitoid of aspidiotus rigidus in Zamboanga Sibugay , Jona Marie Miranda Ilustre and Shannen Faye Marcayda Maiquez

Evaluation of pre-processing tools and provenance in RNA-Seq studies of breast cancer , Gillian Nicole A. Jamias

The association of the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of toxoplasmosis in Cebu, Philippines , Erika Ashley Meg G. Jayma and Catherine Bartolome Lee

A comprehensive study on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) on intestinal parasitic infections among schoolchildren in developing countries , Jezzica D'Andre Raquel Laoque, Joelle Alessandra Cuesta Enrile, and Reggie Ballestar Saringan

An analysis on the behavioral, economic, and social patterning of Schistosoma japonicum infections in endemic areas in the Philippines and other endemic Southeast Asian countries , Ava Sabine L. Ledesma and Cyd Justin T. Solera

COVID-19 associated aspergillosis, candidiasis, cryptococcosis, and mucormycosis infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: A systematic review , Denise Vina Tan Li and Jasmine Gail F. Lizano

The effects of cannabidiol on skin: A bibliometric review , Shannen Meeka L. Lim and Brina Sabelle C. Secosana

An analysis on the variability of the tilapia lake virus (TiLV) whole genome to aid in detection and treatment target , Rain Allisha M. Lontok

Efficacy of antimalarial drug treatments for uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in selected Southeast Asian countries: A meta-analysis , Jed Arvin S. Lurzano, Charles Paolo P. Platon, and Johan Christian T. Tansiongkun

Narrative synthesis on the antibacterial properties of plants from the apocynaceae family that can be found in the Philippines , Melice Mei Del Moro Mago and Jasmine Rose Colico Martinez

In silico screening of the SH3 resistance locus in coffea canephora and coffea arabica for candidate genes involved in coffee leaf rust resistance , Marc Lenard T. Merlin

A comparative study of the secondary metabolites contributing to the antimicrobial properties of plants belonging to Fabaceae and Lamiaceae families that are found in the Philippines , Jenny Anne Clanor Paloma, Raniel Angelo Guinto Ramos, and Bryll Jay Cerdan Carilla

Designing loop-mediated isothermal amplification primers for molecular-based nitrogen monitoring in Oryza sativa L. (rice) , Vivia Anne Lourdes O. Pepingco

Vitamin D deficiency as an indicator of asthma in children in developing countries: A meta-analysis , Benz Arielle T. Sabellon, Maria Patricia Micaela Y. Souza, and Camille Maxine Anne B. Viceral

A comprehensive study of maternal and congenital toxoplasmosis , Christiana J. Santiago, Jmelyn Nicole H. Sy, and Eunice Maryan S. Vargas

Caffeine as a preventive supplement for Parkinson’s disease: A meta-analysis , Swizza Rivera Siega, Lorraine Lim Simeon Cua, and Luis Reyes Oronce

Association of C-reactive protein and D-dimer with diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide as a pulmonary post-COVID-19 sequelae: A systematic review , Heidi Kristine C. Tan and Kimichiro B. Yagi

Prevalence and associated risk factors of waterborne parasitic infections in the Philippines, Malaysia, and Thailand: A systematic review and meta-analysis , Francesca Frigillana Villanueva, Franco Almino B. Libre, and Ryan T. Paras

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

A comprehensive evaluation of medicinal plants from Mindanao, Philippines using secondary data reported between 1970 and 2020 , Derrick Myles Y. Acosta, Rolland Mae Z. Jose, and Josh Matthew R. Oronce

Exploring the effects of portulaca oleracea (olasiman) on maternal-neonatal wellness: ICR murine model , Christopher Sebastiano P. Almazar

Preliminary analysis of the biological response of sub-adult scylla serrata (mangrove crabs) on phosphate & on phosphate-containing shampoo , Kobee D. Bacolod

Clinical and nutritional outcomes of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis on maternal and child health , Francees Raphaiel Fortu Cabaltera, Arienne Therese Pangilinan Evangelista, and Ramon Joaquin Amparo Isaguirre

A meta-analysis on the therapeutic effects of silver nanoparticles on colitis-induced mouse models , Yuen Kun Chelsea Cheuk

Narrative synthesis of the medicinal plants in Luzon, Philippines based on online publications from 1996 to 2020 , Koleen Faye Umali Constantino and Mark Joseph Condeno Salazar

An assessment of the potential of long-term storage of pemphis acidula J.R. Forst. & G. Forst. “Bantigue” (Family Lythraceae) seeds pre-treated under different relative humidity conditions , Miguel Lorenzo Z. De Leon

Efficiency assessment of regionally derived 16S rDNA and COI sequences for widescale detection of mangrove crab (Scylla serrata) (Forskål) population structure , Alexis Gwyneth P. Desuasido

A systematic review on the association between the climatic factors and the prevalence of disease in the Philippines with respect to the trends in other Southeast Asian countries , Kyle Justine R. Gregorio and Ysabelle Marian M. Guzman

Evaluating variability in interferon gamma and toll like receptor 4 in the chicken (gallus gallus, linnaeus, 1758) for comparison of known breeds with the native Philippine chicken , Jed Allyn T. Hernandez and Zaki L. Suficiencia

Using alignment-based methods in the phylogenetic inferencing of genus Andrographis Wall. ex Nees , Ma. Loren Elena C. Juaban

A narrative synthesis of studies on medicinal plants from Visayas, Philippines reported between the period 1970 to 2020 , Daeun Lee, Kyle Jigger D. Bartolome, and Francis Christian L. Luakian

A systematic review of biosensors suitable for environmental biomonitoring of heavy metal water pollution in the Philippines , Winona Abidin Peñafiel and Dominique Ma. Francesca A. Ybañez

Criteria for comparisons and recommendations for a next generation of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells as HIV-1 treatment , Anne Kimberly Bueno Sabado

Analysis of the variation of age-specific life expectancies between sexes due to Covid-19 in the National Capital Region (NCR), the Philippines , Aubrey Christine C. Tatoy

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

A comprehensive study on the prevalence of capillariasis associated with beliefs, practices, and dietary habits , Monica Louisse A. Briones and John Martin A. Borja

Zinc supplementation as an adjunct treatment for acute diarrhea among pediatric patients in developed countries: A meta-analysis , Claire Angelica A. Escueta

Meta-analysis of hypertension as a comorbid condition of COVID-19 patients , Margerie Zia Sayo Majarais and Princess Janna Bandrang Mala

Bioclimate-based species distribution modelling of the two key insect pests of Theobroma cacao in the Philippines , Tisha Marie F. Navarrosa, Camille Anne C. Angeles, and Gabriel John C. Tolentino

The influence of helminthiasis on the cognitive performance of school children: A meta-analysis , Katherina J. Soberano and Tiffany D. Blanquera

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bachelor thesis biology example

Thesis: Bachelor & Master

The final thesis is one of the last sections of the degree program. For information on registration deadlines, please refer to your corresponding examination regulations, linked on the page Exams

The thesis must always be registered in the Student Administration Office (exception: Master IBT ). Please use the corresponding forms for this purpose:

Request for admission to the Bachelor thesis

Request for admission to the Master thesis

With the registration of a thesis, the student bindingly determines the title, start and submission of his/her thesis. The period of practical and written work until submission comprises six months. Each registered thesis is counted as an attempt. Without submission, final papers may be repeated once.

Further necessary information and forms from the examination boards of the biological sciences can be found on this page. If you are still missing something, please feel free to contact the appropriate contact person listed opposite.

External Bachelor thesis

External work can be done e.g. in researching companies, at institutes of other departments or faculties of the University of Ulm, at non-university research institutions or at institutes of other universities.

Bachelor theses in Biology B. Sc. programs are "external" if they are not officially supervised by a person who is appointed as an examiner in the aforementioned programs and is allowed to prepare the expert opinion. Appointed examiners are, in addition to the professors and post-doctoral lecturers of the Department of Biology, all post-doctoral lecturers (also from other subjects) who are regularly involved in teaching in the degree programs with an effort of at least 1 SWS in compulsory or elective courses.

If you want to do an external Bachelor thesis, you have to get it approved by the examination board Biology in time (at least two weeks) before starting the thesis. For this purpose, please submit an (informal) application to the Biology Examination Committee, including your complete sender (address), and addressed to the chairperson(s) of the Examination Committee.

The application must contain a brief description of the planned bachelor thesis. This must indicate where the work is to be carried out and who is responsible for supervision there. As a rule, this person must have a habilitation. Furthermore, it must be clear from the application which methods will be used.

The brief description of the project can also be prepared as a separate letter by the potential supervisor and attached to the application. External work must always be reviewed by an examiner from biology in the sense mentioned above. You should already indicate in the application whom you could win as a reviewer.

Please send the application by email to Mrs Theilacker.

Your application will then be reviewed by the Examination Committee (PA) and you will be informed of the decision made as soon as possible.

The following criteria are important for the PA's decision:

  • adequate supervision must be ensured,
  • the subject must be biologically oriented,
  • the range of methods must also be biological and appropriate to a scientific thesis;
  • Topics that could also be carried out at institutes of the University of Ulm in a very similar way should not be prepared externally; if necessary, cooperations or the like can be sought here.

Application for external theses for students in the subject Biology

The following professors are involved in teaching biology (list not complete):

All professors in the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Biophysics, Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, and additional:

  • Central Facility Electron Microscopy: Prof. Dr. Walther
  • Institute for Experimental Physics: Prof. Dr. Marti
  • Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Prof. Dr. Kühl
  • Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Toxicology and Naturopathy: Prof. Dr. Barth, Prof. Dr. Syrovets, Prof. Dr. Möpps, Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou
  • Institute of Physiological Chemistry: Prof. Dr. Wirth
  • Institute of Human Genetics: Prof. Dr. Siebert, Prof. Dr. Ammerpohl, Prof. Kehrer-Sawatzki
  • Institute of Molecular Virology: Prof Dr Kirchhoff, Prof Dr Münch, Jun.-Prof. Sauter
  • Institute of Virology: apl Prof. Dr. von Einem, Prof. Dr. Sinzger, Prof. Dr. Stamminger
  • Clinic for Internal Medicine 1: apl. Prof. Dr. Oswald, apl. Prof. Dr. Schirmbeck
  • Clinic for Neurology: Prof. Dr. Steinacker

Handout for students for writing an external thesis

Model contract

Bachelor theses in the Biochemistry B. Sc. program are "external" if they are not done in institutes of the Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biophysics and not with certain associated lecturers (professors and private lecturers) who are substantially involved in the teaching of biochemistry (for a list of these institutes, as well as further notes on this, see below).

If you want to do an external bachelor thesis, you have to get it approved by the examination board Biochemistry in time before starting the thesis, at least six weeks before.

! Important for planning !

Applications for master theses to start in the period August to January have to be submitted for the May meeting of the examination board (submission until 30.4.). Applications for master theses to start in the period February to July have to be submitted for the November meeting of the examination board (submission until 31.10.).

To do this, please submit an application to the Biochemistry Examination Committee, including your full sender (address with email address) and addressed to the chair of the Examination Committee. The application must contain a short description of the planned Bachelor thesis. It must indicate where the work is to be carried out and who is responsible for supervision there. As a rule, this person must be a habilitated professor. The brief description of the project can also be prepared as a separate letter by the potential supervisor and attached to the application.

Furthermore, the application must indicate which methods will be used.

External work must always be reviewed either by a reviewer from the institutes of the Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biophysics or by associated faculty (professors and private lecturers) who are substantially involved in teaching biochemistry. A list of possible supervisors/reviewers can be found below.

You should already indicate in the application whom you could win as an "internal" or associated supervisor or reviewer.

Please send the application by email to Mrs Theilacker (Office of the Examination Committee).

Your application will then be reviewed by the Examination Committee and you will be informed of the decision taken as soon as possible.

The following criteria are important for the decision of the examination board:

  • Topics that could also be carried out at institutes of the University of Ulm in a very similar way should not be done externally, but if necessary, cooperations or the like can be sought,
  • the subject must be a "biochemical" one,
  • the range of methods must also be biochemical and sufficient,
  • adequate supervision must be ensured.

Important information for external final projects at companies (with non-disclosure agreement) can be found here, with an example of an agreement.

List of internal and associated supervisors/reviewers

1. internal supervisors/ reviewers

  • All professors and private lecturers of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, the Institute of Biophysics, and Prof. Dr. Gottschalk.

2. associated supervisors/reviewers

  • Institute for Quantum Physics: Prof. Dr. Freyberger
  • Institute of Naturopathy and Clinical Pharmacology: Prof. Dr. Syrovets
  • Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology: Prof. Dr. Barth, Prof. Dr. Möpps
  • Institute of Virology: Jun.Prof. Dr. von Einem
  • Internal Medicine I: Prof. Dr. Oswald

External Master's thesis

External Master's theses can be written, for example, in research-based companies, at institutes of other departments or faculties of the University of Ulm, at non-university research institutions or at institutes of other universities.

Master's theses in the M. Sc. Biology program are "external" if they are not officially supervised by a person who is appointed as an examiner in the above-mentioned degree programs and who is allowed to prepare the expert opinion. Appointed examiners are, in addition to the professors and post-doctoral lecturers of the Department of Biology, all post-doctoral lecturers (also from other subjects) who are regularly involved in teaching in the degree programs with an effort of at least 1 SWS in compulsory or elective courses.

If you want to do an external Master's thesis, you have to get it approved by the Biology Examination Committee in due time (at least two weeks) before starting the thesis. To do so, please submit an (informal) application to the Biology Examination Committee, including your full sender (address), and addressed to the chairperson(s) of the Examination Committee.

The application must contain a short description of the planned master thesis. It must indicate where the work is to be carried out and who is responsible for supervision there. As a rule, this person must be a habilitated professor. Furthermore, it must be clear from the application which methods will be used.

Please send the application by email to the Examination Committee Biology .

  • Institute of Molecular Virology: Prof. Dr. Kirchhoff, Prof. Dr. Münch, Jun.-Prof. Sauter
  • Department of Neurology: Prof. Dr. Steinacker

Information for students on the preparation of external theses

Master's theses in the Biochemistry MSc program are "external" if they are not done in institutes of the Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biophysics and not with certain associated lecturers (professors and private lecturers) who are substantially involved in the teaching of biochemistry (for a list of these institutes, as well as further notes on this, see below).

If you want to do an external master thesis, you have to get the approval of the examination board Biochemistry in time before starting the thesis . The examination board decides on available applications in two meetings per year , usually one meeting takes place in May , the other in November . For the May meeting, applications must be submitted to the Examination Committee Biochemistry by 04/30, for the November meeting by 10/31. Please take this into account in your planning. Please also plan for the fact that your application may be rejected.

Application

To apply, please submit the following three documents:

  • The filled out Application form for external Master thesis
  • Project description prepared by the external supervisor (informal, 0.5 - 1 page)
  • The filled out Declaration of the supervisor that he provides an assessment of the student

For external papers you need two reviewers , both reviewers must be appointed examiners, one reviewer must be from institutes of the Department of Chemistry, Biology or Biophysics. Please also include the names of both reviewers in the application (you must obtain their consent before doing so). Please send the application by email to Mrs Theilacker .

Your application will then be reviewed by the Examination Board in a meeting and you will be informed of the decision made as soon as possible. The review board meetings for external work requests are held twice a year, usually in May and November. Please keep this in mind when making your plans, please also be prepared for the possibility that your application may be rejected.

The following criteria are important for the decision of the review committee:

  • Topics that could also be carried out at institutes of the University of Ulm in a very similar way should not be done externally, if necessary, one can then also strive for cooperation here. Please also note the offers of the internal working groups of the University of Ulm, which are linked here,
  • it must be a biochemical issue,
  • different methods should be used in the work and mainly biochemical methods should be used.

Important information for external final theses at companies (with non-disclosure agreement) you will find here . With an example of an agreement.

Wann müssen Sie einen Antrag stellen:

  • Institutes of the Department of Chemistry,
  • Biology and
  • Biophysics and
  • at Prof. Dr. Gottschalk.  
  • Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology: Prof. Dr. Barth, Prof. Dr. Möpps
  • Institute of Virology: Jun. Prof. Dr. von Einem
  • Internal Medicine I: Prof. Dr. Oswald  

or all other institutes of the university (which are not listed under 1 and 2) ... is to be carried out!

Master theses in the M.Sc. Industrial Biotechnology program are " external " if they are not officially supervised by a person who is appointed as an examiner in the M.Sc. Industrial Biotechnology program.

A list of possible internal examiners can be found at the bottom of this page.

If you want to do an external master thesis, you have to get it approved by the Examination Board Industrial Biotechnology in time before starting the thesis. Please take into account in your planning that the examination board usually only decides once per semester on available applications. Please also plan for the fact that your application may be rejected.

For approval, please submit an application to the Industrial Biotechnology Examination Committee. The application must contain a short description of the planned master thesis. It must state where the work is to be carried out and who is responsible for supervision there*. Furthermore, the description must indicate which methods will be used. External work must always be examined by an examiner in the sense mentioned above. You should already indicate in the application whom you could win as an examiner. Furthermore, please submit the signed form " Information for students on the preparation of external theses " together with the application.

Please submit the application to Dr. Eigenstetter, the program coordinator at Biberach University (House PBT, Room P3.04) or to Mrs Dr. John , the study program coordinator at Ulm University (M24 / 574).

  • the topic must be oriented towards the subject of the curriculum,
  • the range of methods must also be oriented to the subject orientation of the curriculum and be appropriate for a scientific thesis;
  • Topics that could also be carried out in a very similar way at institutes of the University of Ulm or the Biberach University of Applied Sciences should not be prepared externally; if necessary, cooperations or similar can be sought here.

*: In addition to a Master's degree, the external supervisor should have at least 3 years of professional experience before the supervision of the Master's thesis begins.

The following persons are possible as internal examiners of the master thesis (this list may not be complete, please ask Dr. Eigenstetter or Dr. John if necessary):

Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Institute for Applied Biotechnology :

  • Prof. Dr. Carsten Schips
  • Prof. Dr. Sybille Ebert
  • Prof. Dr. Heike Frühwirth
  • Prof. Dr. Hartmut Grammel
  • Prof. Dr. Friedemann Hesse
  • Prof. Dr. Hans Kiefer
  • Prof. Dr. Jürgen Hannemann
  • Prof. Dr. Katharina Zimmermann
  • Prof. Dr. Chrystelle Mavoungou
  • Prof. Dr. Oliver Hädicke
  • Prof. Dr. Kerstin Otte
  • Prof. Dr. Annette Schafmeister
  • Prof. Dr. Sabine Gaisser
  • Prof. Dr. Bernd Burghardt
  • Prof. Dr. Ute Traub
  • Dr. René Handrick
  • Dr. Gerhard Eigenstetter
  • Dr. Sabine Arnold
  • Dr. Barbara Bottenbruch
  • Dr. Francoise Chamouleau
  • Dr. Jens Geier
  • Dr. Anna Gilles
  • Dr. Kinga Gerber

Ulm University, Institute of Microbiology and Biotechnology:

  • Prof. Dr. Bernhard Eikmanns
  • Prof. Dr. Peter Dürre
  • Dr. Frank Bengelsdorf
  • PD Dr. Christian Riedel

Ulm University, Institute for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology:

  • Prof. Dr. Dierk Niessing
  • Dr. Frank Rosenau
  • Dr. Thomas Monecke

Ulm University, Institute of Animal Molecular Endocrinology:

  • Prof. Dr. Jan Tuckermann

Ulm University, Institute for Experimental Physics:

  • Prof. Dr. Kay Gottschalk

Master theses and / or advanced internships in the M.Sc. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology program are " external " if they are not officially supervised by a person appointed as an examiner in the M.Sc. Pharmaceutical Biotechnology program.

If you want to do an external master thesis and / or an external advanced internship, you have to get it / them approved by the Examination Board Pharmaceutical Biotechnology in time before starting the thesis. Please submit your application at least 2 months before the start of the external master thesis and / or external advanced internship. Please also plan for the fact that your application may be rejected.

For approval, please submit an application ( FSPO 2016 / FSPO 2020 ) (preferably in digital form) to the Examination Committee Pharmaceutical Biotechnology. The application must include a brief description of the planned master's thesis and / or advanced internship. This must indicate where the thesis and / or the internship is to be carried out and who is responsible for supervision there*. Furthermore, the description must indicate which methods will be used. External work and advanced internships must always be reviewed by an internal examiner. You should already indicate in the application whom you could win as an internal examiner. Furthermore, please submit the signed form " Information for students on the preparation of external theses " together with the application.

Please hand in the application to Ms. Annetraut Scheiffele (secretary's office of the Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology; room N27 2.076).

  • adequate supervision must be ensured
  • the topic must be oriented towards the subject of the curriculum
  • the range of methods must also be oriented to the subject orientation of the curriculum and must be appropriate for a scientific final thesis
  • Topics that could also be carried out at institutes of the University of Ulm or the Biberach University of Applied Sciences in a very similar way should not be prepared externally, if necessary, cooperations or the like can be striven for here

 *: In addition to a Master's degree, the external supervisor should have at least 3 years of professional experience before the supervision of the Master's thesis begins.

The following persons are possible as internal/examiners for the master thesis and / or the advanced internship (this list may not be complete, please check with Dr. John if necessary):

Ulm University,  Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology (Ulm University Hospital):

  • Prof. Dr. Barbara Möpps
  • Prof. Dr. Holger Barth

Ulm University, General and Visceral Surgery (Ulm University Hospital):

  • Prof. Dr. Uwe Knippschild
  • PD Dr. rer. nat. Joachim Bischof
  • Dr. med. Pengfei Xu

Ulm University, Institute of Virology (Ulm University Hospital):

  • Jun.Prof. Dr. Jens von Einem

Ulm University, Department of Internal Medicine I (Ulm University Hospital):

  • Prof. Dr. Franz Oswald

Extension of the thesis

Upon justified request, the Bachelor's or Master's thesis can be extended (see § 16c (7) of the framework regulations of UUlm).

A Bachelor's thesis can be extended by max. 2 weeks, a Master's thesis by max. 4 weeks (exception Master IBT: here an extension of the Master's thesis is limited to max. 2 months).

Please refer to the tab of your study program for the respective information on how to apply.

bachelor thesis biology example

Requests for extension of the bachelor thesis must be submitted to the Biology Examination Committee 2 weeks before the first deadline. Bachelor's theses can be extended by 2 weeks depending on the circumstances.

For all extensions please fill in the following form:  Application form

Requests for extension of the master thesis must be submitted to the Biology Examination Committee 2 weeks before the first deadline. Master's theses can be extended by 4 weeks depending on the circumstances.

Please send the application by email tothe Examination Committee Biology .

Please send the application by email to the Examination Committee Biochemistry .

Please submit an informal application. This must contain the following information:

         1. the address of the sender,          2. the address of the person to whom the letter is addressed (chairperson(s) of the PBT Audit Committee),          3. the date the letter was written,          4. the date of the original deadline,          5. one - two sentences for a brief justification of why the extension is requested,          6. signature of the supervisor that he/she agrees with the extension.

Requests for an extension of the master's thesis must be submitted in original to the examination board at least 2 weeks before the first deadline. Master's theses can be extended by 4 weeks depending on the circumstances.

Please send the request to Ms. Annetraut Scheiffele (secretariat of the Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology; room N27 2.076).

Requests for extension of the bachelor or master thesis must be submitted to the Examination Committee 2 weeks before the first deadline. Bachelor's theses can be extended by 2 weeks, master´s thesis by 4 weeks, depending on the circumstances.

"Methods course"

In the bachelor's and master's degree courses in biology and biochemistry, there is a so-called "methods course" before the thesis. This is carried out by the supervisor with whom the thesis is being carried out and, among other things, topic-specific working methods that are required for the respective thesis are learned.

After successful completion, the supervisor enters the relevant proof of achievement in the university portal. Independent registration is not possible. Please note that in the case of internships carried out externally, the internal supervisor must record the performance record.

The "methods course" must be completed so that the thesis can be registered.

For students in the PO 2017, after passing the "methods course", a period begins to register the thesis in the study secretariat (in the bachelor: 2 weeks, in the master: 2 months).

Finally, you will find an overview of how the "methods course" is called in the individual courses and how many CP it includes:

Office of the Study Commission Biology

  • Rainer Pfaff
  • Location: M24/573
  • Phone: +49-(0)731-50 23 93 1
  • Fax: +49-(0)731-50 23 93 2
  • Office hours:
  • Mon. 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wed. 9 - 11 a.m. & 1 - 3 p.m. Fri. 9 - 11 a.m.
  • Please send enquiries by email to sekretariat.biologie(at)uni-ulm.de

Biology & Biochemistry

Please contact sekretariat.biologie(at)uni-ulm.de

Pharmaceutical and Industrial Biotechnology

  • Dr. Lena John
  • Location: M24/574
  • Phone: +49-(0)731-50 22 38 4
  • Office hours by arrangement*

*: Please arrange an appointment via sekretariat.biologie(at)uni-ulm.de

Teaching profession / International

Teaching profession biology.

  • Prof. Dr. Christian Riedel
  • Location: M23/2412
  • Phone: +49-(0)731-50 24 85 3
  • Fax: +49-(0)731-50 22 71 9
  • Office hours by arrangement

FAQs concerning Master theses

Info Master thesis Biochemistry and Biology

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Home > CNS > BIOCHEM > MCB > MCB_THESES

Molecular and Cellular Biology Masters Theses Collection

Theses from 2024 2024.

The Impact of a Non-ionic Adjuvant to the Persistence of Pesticides on Produce Surfaces , Daniel Barnes, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Investigating the Role of Got2 in Murine Organogenesis and Placenta Development , Olivia Macrorie, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Chromatin Accessibility Impacts Knockout of Mt-Bell4 Transcription Factor , Thomas Redden, Molecular & Cellular Biology

UNDERSTANDING THE FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF DISEASE-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHORYLATION SITES ON THE NEURODEGENERATIVE PROTEIN TAU , Navya T. Sebastian, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2023 2023

Elucidating the Priming Mechanism of ClpXP Protease by Single-Domain Response Regulator CpdR in Caulobacter crescentus , Kimberly E. Barker, Molecular & Cellular Biology

The Discovery of a Novel Bacteria from a Large Co-assembly of Metagenomes , Matthew Finkelberg, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Investigating Diterpene Biosynthesis in Medicago Truncatula , Sungwoo Hwang, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Combining Simulation and the MspA Nanopore to Study p53 Dynamics and Interactions , Samantha A. Schultz, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Caulobacter ClpXP Adaptor PopA’s Domain Interactions in the Adaptor Hierarchy of CtrA Degradation , Thomas P. Scudder, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Climate Change, Giant Viruses and Their Putative Hosts , Sarah K. Tucker, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2022 2022

Changes in Gene Expression From Long-Term Warming Revealed Using Metatranscriptome Mapping to FAC-Sorted Bacteria , Christopher A. Colvin, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Determining CaMKII Variant Activities and Their Roles in Human Disease , Matthew J. Dunn, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Developmental Exposures to PFAS Mixtures Impair Elongation of the Exocrine Pancreas in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) , Emily M. Formato, Molecular & Cellular Biology

A Metatranscriptomic Analysis of the Long-Term Effects of Warming on the Harvard Forest Soil Microbiome , Brooke A. Linnehan, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Characterization of the Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Family in the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex , Daniel Norment, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2021 2021

Exploring Knockdown Phenotypes and Interactions between ATAD3 Proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana , Eli S. Gordon, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Development of a Site-Specific Labeling Assay to Study the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion Translocon in Native Membranes , Kyle A. Mahan, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Liposomal Nanoparticles Target TLR7/8-SHP2 to Repolarize Macrophages to Aid in Cancer Immunotherapy , Vaishali Malik, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Hsp70 Phosphorylation: A Case Study of Serine Residues 385 and 400 , Sashrika Saini, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Activation of Nrf2 at Critical Windows of Development Alters Protein S-Glutathionylation in the Zebrafish Embryo (Danio rerio) , Emily G. Severance, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Utilizing Fluorescence Microscopy to Characterize the Subcellular Distribution of the Novel Protein Acheron , Varun Sheel, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2020 2020

The Association Between Sperm DNA Methylation and Sperm Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number , Emily Houle, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Gene Expression Regulation in the Mouse Liver by Mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin Complexes I and II , Anthony Poluyanoff, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Sperm Mitochondrial DNA Biomarkers as a Measure of Male Fecundity and Overall Sperm Quality , Allyson Rosati, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Exploration of the Association between Muscle Volume and Bone Geometry Reveals Surprising Relationship at the Genetic Level , Prakrit Subba, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2019 2019

Studies on the Interaction and Organization of Bacterial Proteins on Membranes , Mariana Brena, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Investigating The Role Of LBH During Early Embryonic Development In Xenopus Laevis , Emma Weir, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2018 2018

Exploring the Influence of PKC-theta Phosphorylation on Notch1 Activation and T Helper Cell Differentiation , Grace Trombley, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2017 2017

Partial Craniofacial Cartilage Rescue in ace/fgf8 Mutants from Compensatory Signaling From the Ventricle of Danio Rerio , Douglas A. Calenda II, Molecular & Cellular Biology

THE FAR C-TERMINUS OF TPX2 CONTRIBUTES TO SPINDLE MORPHOGENESIS , Brett Estes, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Characterization of Calcium Homeostasis Parameters in TRPV3 and CaV3.2 Double Null Mice , Aujan Mehregan, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Microtransplantation of Rat Brain Neurolemma into Xenopus Laevis Oocytes to Study the Effect of Environmental Toxicants on Endogenous Voltage-Sensitive Ion Channels , Edwin Murenzi, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Regulation of Katanin Activity on Microtubules , Madison A. Tyler, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2016 2016

The Role of MicroRNAs in Regulating the Translatability and Stability of Target Messenger RNAs During the Atrophy and Programmed Cell Death of the Intersegmental Muscles of the Tobacco Hawkmoth Manduca sexta. , Elizabeth Chan, Molecular & Cellular Biology

An in Vivo Study of Cortical Dynein Dynamics and its Contribution to Microtubule Sliding in the Midzone , Heather M. Jordan, Molecular & Cellular Biology

A Genetic Analysis of Cichlid Scale Morphology , Kenta C. Kawasaki, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Modulation of Notch in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis , Manit Nikhil Munshi, Molecular & Cellular Biology

One-Carbon Metabolism Related B-Vitamins Alter The Expression Of MicroRNAS And Target Genes Within The Wnt Signaling Pathway In Mouse Colonic Epithelium , Riccardo Racicot, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Characterizing the Inhibition of Katanin Using Tubulin Carboxy-Terminal Tail Constructs , Corey E. Reed, Molecular & Cellular Biology

The Identification of Notch1 Functional Domains Responsible for its Physical Interaction with PKCθ , Wesley D. Rossiter, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Dynamics of Microtubule Networks with Antiparallel Crosslinkers , Kasimira T. Stanhope, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Modifications of Myofilament Structure and Function During Global Myocardial Ischemia , Mike K. Woodward, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2015 2015

Regulation of Jak1 and Jak2 Synthesis through Non-Classical Progestin Receptors , Hillary Adams, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Antineoplastic Effects of Rhodiola Crenulata on B16-F10 Melanoma , Maxine Dudek, Molecular & Cellular Biology

RNAi Validation of Resistance Genes and Their Interactions in the Highly DDT-Resistant 91-R Strain of Drosophila Melanogaster , Kyle Gellatly, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions for Therapeutic Drug Design Utilizing Mass Spectrometry , Alex J. Johnson, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Promoting Extracellular Matrix Crosslinking in Synthetic Hydrogels , Marcos M. Manganare, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Characterization of the Reconstituted and Native Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion System Translocon , Kathryn R. Monopoli, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Thermocycle-regulated WALL REGULATOR INTERACTING bHLH Encodes a Protein That Interacts with Secondary-Cell-Wall-Associated Transcription Factors , Ian P. Whitney, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2014 2014

Engineering Camelina sativa for Biofuel Production via increasing oil yield and tolerance to abiotic stresses , Kenny Ablordeppey, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Designing a Pore-Forming Toxin Cytolysin A (ClyA) Specific to Target Cancer Cells , Alzira Rocheteau Avelino, Molecular & Cellular Biology

The Role of the Novel Lupus Antigen, Acheron, in Moderating Life and Death Decisions , Ankur Sheel, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Expression and Purification of Human Lysosomal β-galactosidase from Pichia Pastoris , Sarah E. Tarullo, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Properties of Potential Substrates of a Cyanobacterial Small Heat Shock Protein , Yichen Zhang, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2013 2013

Characterizing the Heavy Metal Chelator, Tpen, as a Ca2+ Tool in the Mammalian Oocyte , Robert A. Agreda Mccaughin, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Sustainable Biofuels Production Through Understanding Fundamental Bacterial Pathways Involved in Biomass Degradation and Sugar Utilization , James CM Hayes, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Stiffness and Modulus and Independent Controllers of Breast Cancer Metastasis , Dannielle Ryman, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2012 2012

The Pyrethroid Deltamethrin, Which Causes Choreoathetosis with Salivation (CS-Syndrome), Enhances Calcium Ion Influx via Phosphorylated CaV2.2 expresssed in Xenopus laevis oocytes , Anna-maria Alves, Molecular & Cellular Biology

A Test of the Hypothesis That Environmental Chemicals Interfere With Thyroid Hormone Action in Human Placenta , Katherine Geromini, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Analyzing the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Male-Female Interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. , Eric A. Johnson, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Rhythmic Growth And Vascular Development In Brachypodium Distachyon , Dominick A. Matos, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Polymer Prodrug Conjugation to Tumor Homing Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Nick Panzarino, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Investigation of Differential Vector Competence of Bartonella quintana in Human Head and Body Lice , Domenic j. Previte, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Downregulation of Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase or Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase Leads to Improved Biological Conversion Efficiency in Brachypodium distachyon , Gina M. Trabucco, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2011 2011

Evolutionary Relationship of the ampC Resistance Gene In E. cloacae , Shanika S. Collins, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Sex Difference in Calbindin Cell Number in the Mouse Preoptic Area: Effects of Neonatal Estradiol and Bax Gene Deletion , Richard F. Gilmore III, Molecular & Cellular Biology

In Vivo Investigations of Polymer Conjugates as Therapeutics , Elizabeth M. Henchey, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Examination of Sexually Dimorphic Cell Death in the Pubertal Mouse Brain , Amanda Holley, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Human Niemann-Pick Type C2 Disease Protein Expression, Purification and Crystallization , Yurie T. Kim, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Revealing the Localization of the Class I Formin Family in the Moss Physcomitrella patens Using Gene Targeting Strategies , Kelli Pattavina, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Connecting Motors and Membranes: A Quantitative Investigation of Dynein Pathway Components and in vitro Characterization of the Num1 Coiled Coil Domain , Bryan J. St. Germain, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2010 2010

The Protective Effects A Full-term Pregnancy Plays Against Mammary Carcinoma , Matthew p. Carter, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Analysis Of An Actin Binding Guanine Exchange Factor, Gef8, And Actin Depolymerizing Factor In Arabidopsis Thaliana. , Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Molecular & Cellular Biology

The Role of Ykl-40, a Secreted Heparin-Binding Glycoprotein, in Tumor Angiogenesis, Metastasis, and Progression: a Potential Therapeutic Target , Michael Faibish, Molecular & Cellular Biology

In Vivo Visualization of Hedgehog Signaling in Zebrafish , Christopher J. Ferreira, Molecular & Cellular Biology

An In Vivo Study of the Mammalian Mitotic Kinesin Eg5 , Alyssa D. Gable, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Identification of Dynein Binding Sites in Budding Yeast Pac1/LIS1 , Christopher W. Meaden, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Formin Homologues Afh1, Afh5, Afh6, Afh7 and Afh8 , Shahriar Niroomand, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Regulation of Crbp1 In Mammary Epithelial Cells , Stacy L. Pease, Molecular & Cellular Biology

In Vivo Labeling Of A Model β-Clam Protein With A Fluorescent Amino Acid , Mangayarkarasi Periasamy, Molecular & Cellular Biology

In Vivo Characterization of Interactions Among Dynein Complex Components at Microtubule Plus Ends , Karen M. Plevock, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Anti-Diabetic Potentials of Phenolic Enriched Chilean Potato and Select Herbs of Apiaceae and Lamiaceae Families , Fahad Saleem, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes , Ivan B. Tomasic, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Deletions of Fstl3 and/or Fst Isoforms 303 and 315 Results in Hepatic Steatosis , Nathan A. Ungerleider, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2009 2009

A New Laser Pointer Driven Optical Microheater for Precise Local Heat Shock , Mike Placinta, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2008 2008

Cysteine Dioxygenase: The Importance of Key Residues and Insight into the Mechanism of the Metal Center , Jonathan H. Leung, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Invertebrate Phenology and Prey Selection of Three Sympatric Species of Salmonids; Implications for Individual Fish Growth , Jeffrey V. Ojala, Wildlife & Fisheries Conservation

Paralemmin Splice Variants and mRNA and Protein Expression in Breast Cancer , Casey M. Turk, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Stability of the frog motor nerve terminal: roles of perisynaptic Schwann cells and muscle fibers , Ling Xin, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Theses from 2007 2007

Antioxidant Response Mechanism in Apples during Post-Harvest Storage and Implications for Human Health Benefits , Ishan Adyanthaya, Molecular & Cellular Biology

Progress Towards A Model Flavoenzyme System , Kevin M. Bardon, Molecular & Cellular Biology

The effect of Rhodiola crenulata on a highly metastatic murine mammary carcinoma , Jessica L. Doerner, Molecular & Cellular Biology

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This collection of MIT Theses in DSpace contains selected theses and dissertations from all MIT departments. Please note that this is NOT a complete collection of MIT theses. To search all MIT theses, use MIT Libraries' catalog .

MIT's DSpace contains more than 58,000 theses completed at MIT dating as far back as the mid 1800's. Theses in this collection have been scanned by the MIT Libraries or submitted in electronic format by thesis authors. Since 2004 all new Masters and Ph.D. theses are scanned and added to this collection after degrees are awarded.

MIT Theses are openly available to all readers. Please share how this access affects or benefits you. Your story matters.

If you have questions about MIT theses in DSpace, [email protected] . See also Access & Availability Questions or About MIT Theses in DSpace .

If you are a recent MIT graduate, your thesis will be added to DSpace within 3-6 months after your graduation date. Please email [email protected] with any questions.

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Biochemistry is the basic science which has as its goal an explanation of life processes in physical and chemical terms. Founded in 1883, today's Department of Biochemistry emphasizes cellular regulation, molecular genetics, protein structure, hormone action, virology, and developmental biology. The undergraduate biochemistry major fits the needs of both the student who wishes to terminate training at the B.S. level, and the student planning on graduate or professional school study. It serves as an excellent background for medical or veterinary school, and for graduate study in such fields as biochemistry, biology, bacteriology, genetics, molecular biology and oncology.

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Faculty / Biology / Department of Experimental Plant Biology / Studies / Bachelor theses

Bachelor theses

bachelor thesis biology example

Important dates: 

  • For actual dates, please, check our Czech version of this page.

Basic requirements for the bachelor thesis:

  • The thesis has to be written out and processed as a review. Experimental data are not required for the bachelor thesis.
  • The thesis should be written in Czech. Slovak students can apply to write it in Slovak. English is allowed only in the case the student, the supervisor or the consultant cannot fulfil their roles in Czech properly.
  • Typically the main text body should range from 15 to 20 pages and the text should not be shorter than 15 pages. The whole thesis, including figures and all attachments, must NOT exceed 40 pages. The formatting (obligatory) guidelines: 1,5 line spacing; margin width maximum 2,5 cm; at least 70 characters per line.
  • The thesis must include following sections: Abstract (max. 2000 words in Czech/Slovak and English), keywords (5-10, in Czech/Slovak and English), Introduction, Review (the main body of the text), References. The thesis may also include an Attachment (tables, images etc.).
  • The thesis may include a brief overview of the potential scopes of the research (methods, experimental set-up, approach to assess the data, possible problems or limits) or results of own experimental work.
  • The thesis is submitted in printed, bundled form (2 pieces) as well as in electronic form (single pdf file on CD/DVD).

Topics of the bachelor theses:

You may find and sign up for currently offered bachelor theses in SIS .

  • The topics for the Bachelor theses as well as the name of the supervisor and possible consultant must be listed in SIS. Here you can also find additional topics which have not been assigned to any student yet. Further theses topics may be discussed individually with a member of the department according to the student´s interest (for research groups and topics as well as members and affiliate members of the department, see the  list of members and Research menu ).   
  • If you are an external or affiliate member of the Department of Experimental Plant Biology and you are interested in offering a topic for Bachelor or Master thesis, please check the validity of your password for SIS. In case your password does not work or if you need to gain new access to SIS, please contact RNDr. Hana Konrádová, PhD ( [email protected] ). 
  • Every supervisor can easily announce new project topics for Master theses by himself/herself in SIS/položka "zadávání prací". 
  • According to the decision made by the Department of Experimental Plant Biology, it is necessary that each affiliate supervisor finds a consultant within the regular members of the Department who ensures that Faculty´s formal requirements are met.

Instructions for supervisors and opponents of the bachelor theses from the Department of Experimental Plant Biology:

  • The supervisor announces the nominated opponent (who agreed preliminarily to act as an opponent) and his contact to RNDr. Hana Konrádová, PhD (Study advisor at the Department of Experimental Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, [email protected]) at least a week before the bachelor theses submission deadline.
  • The Chair of the Department or RNDr. Hana Konrádová, PhD as his/her deputy officially asks (by e-mail) the opponent to write his/her comments by the date of the bachelor theses submission deadline The official invitation of the opponent to write his/her comments is forwarded to the supervisor.
  • It is the supervisor´s responsibility to hand over the printed thesis to the opponent as soon as possible, ideally, on the same day the thesis was submitted.
  • Both the opponent and the supervisor submit their comments at least a week before the thesis defence.
  • Form: Supervisor´s comments for a bachelor thesis -   skolitel_posudekBP.doc
  • Form: Opponent´s comments on a bachelor thesis -  oponent_posudekBP.doc
  • We kindly ask the supervisors and opponents for short and clear comments on each point of the form (please limit your answers according to the instructions). In bold are the mandatory parts of the comments.
  • The comments should be submitted electronically to [email protected] and [email protected] as well as signed original (1 print-out ) at the administration office of the Department of Experimental Plant Biology before the defence (p. Elena Kozlová), Viničná 5, 128 44 Praha 2. The print-out is a necessary part of the defence course report).

The response of Assoc. Prof. RNDr. Petr Folka, CSc., vice dean of the Biological Section of the Faculty of Science, for the question: “ May be the Bachelor thesis used as an Introduction for the Master thesis? ”  "The Bachelor thesis is a unique authorial body of the text as well as is the Master thesis. The Introduction or even parts of the Introduction of the Master thesis may not be identical to Bachelor thesis. In this case, it would be auto-plagiarism. When you are writing two different texts, in this case, to pursue two different academic degrees, you must complete two different author works. The situation may be also illustrated in the following example: the baker may sell one loaf of bread only to one customer, not to two customers. Moreover, the lack of improvement of the immature Bachelor thesis text would be lamentable, even in the case of similar topics of both Bachelor and Master thesis."

The course of the bachelor theses defence:

  • The bachelor theses defence session is lead by the chair of the committee. After introducing by the committee the student gives a 10-12 min talk on his or her work. It is not allowed to exceed the time limit – the chair interrupts and ends up the presentation after 15 minutes.
  • The supervisor´s and opponent´s comments are presented. Subsequently, the opponent asks questions one after another and brings up his/her comments. The student´s responses follow immediately. For this purpose, additional slides with answers are possible.
  • Public discussion follows – the student is asked questions (supervisor responses only if encouraged by the chair). Estimated total time for 1 student defence is approximately 25 min.

The selection of recently defended Bachelor thesis:

Bachelor thesis defended September 3, 2015:

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How to Craft Your Ideal Thesis Research Topic

How to Craft Your Ideal Thesis Research Topic

Table of contents

bachelor thesis biology example

Catherine Miller

Writing your undergraduate thesis is probably one of the most interesting parts of studying, especially because you get to choose your area of study. But as both a student and a teacher who’s helped countless students develop their research topics, I know this freedom can be just as intimidating as it is liberating.

Fortunately, there’a a step-by-step process you can follow that will help make the whole process a lot easier. In this article, I’ll show you how to choose a unique, specific thesis topic that’s true to your passions and interests, while making a contribution to your field.

bachelor thesis biology example

Choose a topic that you’re interested in

First things first: double-check with your teachers or supervisor if there are any constraints on your research topic. Once your parameters are clear, it’s time to identify what lights you up — after all, you’re going to be spending a lot of time thinking about it.

Within your field of study, you probably already have some topics that have grabbed your attention more than others. This can be a great place to start. Additionally, consider using the rest of your academic and extra-curricular interests as a source of ideas. At this stage, you only need a broad topic before you narrow it down to a specific question. 

If you’re feeling stuck, here are some things to try:

  • Look back through old course notes to remind yourself of topics you previously covered. Do any of these inspire you?
  • Talk to potential supervisors about your ideas, as they can point you toward areas you might not have considered.
  • Think about the things you enjoy in everyday life — whether that’s cycling, cinema, cooking, or fashion — then consider if there are any overlaps with your field of study.
  • Imagine you have been asked to give a presentation or record a podcast in the next three days. What topics would you feel confident discussing?
  • Watch a selection of existing lectures or explainer videos, or listen to podcasts by experts in your field. Note which topics you feel curious to explore further.
  • Discuss your field of study with teachers friends and family, some with existing knowledge and some without. Which aspects do you enjoy talking about? 

By doing all this, you might uncover some unusual and exciting avenues for research. For example, when writing my Master’s dissertation, I decided to combine my field of study (English teaching methodology) with one of my passions outside work (creative writing). In my undergraduate course, a friend drew on her lived experience of disability to look into the literary portrayal of disability in the ancient world. 

Do your research

Once you’ve chosen your topic of interest, it’s time to dive into research. This is a really important part of this early process because it allows you to:

  • See what other people have written about the topic — you don’t want to cover the same old ground as everyone else.
  • Gain perspective on the big questions surrounding the topic. 
  • Go deeper into the parts that interest you to help you decide where to focus.
  • Start building your bibliography and a bank of interesting quotations. 

A great way to start is to visit your library for an introductory book. For example, the “A Very Short Introduction” series from the Oxford University Press provides overviews of a range of themes. Similar types of overviews may have the title “ A Companion to [Subject]” or “[Subject] A Student Companion”. Ask your librarian or teacher if you’re not sure where to begin. 

Your introductory volume can spark ideas for further research, and the bibliography can give you some pointers about where to go next. You can also use keywords to research online via academic sites like JStor or Google Scholar. Check which subscriptions are available via your institution.

At this stage, you may not wish to read every single paper you come across in full — this could take a very long time and not everything will be relevant. Summarizing software like Wordtune could be very useful here.

Just upload a PDF or link to an online article using Wordtune, and it will produce a summary of the whole paper with a list of key points. This helps you to quickly sift through papers to grasp their central ideas and identify which ones to read in full. 

Screenshot of Wordtune's summarizing tool

Get Wordtune for free > Get Wordtune for free >

You can also use Wordtune for semantic search. In this case, the tool focuses its summary around your chosen search term, making it even easier to get what you need from the paper.

bachelor thesis biology example

As you go, make sure you keep organized notes of what you’ve read, including the author and publication information and the page number of any citations you want to use. 

Some people are happy to do this process with pen and paper, but if you prefer a digital method, there are several software options, including Zotero , EndNote , and Mendeley . Your institution may have an existing subscription so check before you sign up.

Narrowing down your thesis research topic

Now you’ve read around the topic, it’s time to narrow down your ideas so you can craft your final question. For example, when it came to my undergraduate thesis, I knew I wanted to write about Ancient Greek religion and I was interested in the topic of goddesses. So, I:

  • Did some wide reading around the topic of goddesses
  • Learned that the goddess Hera was not as well researched as others and that there were some fascinating aspects I wanted to explore
  • Decided (with my supervisor’s support) to focus on her temples in the Argive region of Greece

bachelor thesis biology example

As part of this process, it can be helpful to consider the “5 Ws”: why, what, who, when, and where, as you move from the bigger picture to something more precise. 

Why did you choose this research topic?

Come back to the reasons you originally chose your theme. What grabbed you? Why is this topic important to you — or to the wider world? In my example, I knew I wanted to write about goddesses because, as a woman, I was interested in how a society in which female lives were often highly controlled dealt with having powerful female deities. My research highlighted Hera as one of the most powerful goddesses, tying into my key interest.

What are some of the big questions about your topic?

During your research, you’ll probably run into the same themes time and time again. Some of the questions that arise may not have been answered yet or might benefit from a fresh look. 

Equally, there may be questions that haven’t yet been asked, especially if you are approaching the topic from a modern perspective or combining research that hasn’t been considered before. This might include taking a post-colonial, feminist, or queer approach to older texts or bringing in research using new scientific methods.

In my example, I knew there were still controversies about why so many temples to the goddess Hera were built in a certain region, and was keen to explore these further.

Who is the research topic relevant to?

Considering the “who” might help you open up new avenues. Is there a particular audience you want to reach? What might they be interested in? Is this a new audience for this field? Are there people out there who might be affected by the outcome of this research — for example, people with a particular medical condition — who might be able to use your conclusions?

Which period will you focus on?

Depending on the nature of your field, you might be able to choose a timeframe, which can help narrow the topic down. For example, you might focus on historical events that took place over a handful of years, look at the impact of a work of literature at a certain point after its publication, or review scientific progress over the last five years. 

With my thesis, I decided to focus on the time when the temples were built rather than considering the hundreds of years for which they have existed, which would have taken me far too long.

Where does your topic relate to?

Place can be another means of narrowing down the topic. For example, consider the impact of your topic on a particular neighborhood, city, or country, rather than trying to process a global question. 

In my example, I chose to focus my research on one area of Greece, where there were lots of temples to Hera. This meant skipping other important locations, but including these would have made the thesis too wide-ranging.

Create an outline and get feedback

Once you have an idea of what you are going to write about, create an outline or summary and get feedback from your teacher(s). It’s okay if you don’t know exactly how you’re going to answer your thesis question yet, but based on your research you should have a rough plan of the key points you want to cover. So, for me, the outline was as follows:

  • Context: who was the goddess Hera?
  • Overview of her sanctuaries in the Argive region
  • Their initial development 
  • Political and cultural influences
  • The importance of the mythical past

In the final thesis, I took a strong view on why the goddess was so important in this region, but it took more research, writing, and discussion with my supervisor to pin down my argument.

To choose a thesis research topic, find something you’re passionate about, research widely to get the big picture, and then move to a more focused view. Bringing a fresh perspective to a popular theme, finding an underserved audience who could benefit from your research, or answering a controversial question can make your thesis stand out from the crowd.

For tips on how to start writing your thesis, don’t miss our advice on writing a great research abstract and a stellar literature review . And don’t forget that Wordtune can also support you with proofreading, making it even easier to submit a polished thesis.

How do you come up with a research topic for a thesis?

To help you find a thesis topic, speak to your professor, look through your old course notes, think about what you already enjoy in everyday life, talk about your field of study with friends and family, and research podcasts and videos to find a topic that is interesting for you. It’s a good idea to refine your topic so that it’s not too general or broad.  

Do you choose your own thesis topic?

Yes, you usually choose your own thesis topic. You can get help from your professor(s), friends, and family to figure out which research topic is interesting to you. 

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Academic Background: I completed my Bachelor’s in Biological Sciences at UC Berkeley, focusing on genetics, molecular biology, and biochemistry. My senior thesis, “Genetic Modifications to Improve Crop Resistance,” provided me with a strong foundation in genetic engineering and its applications. I graduated with a 3.8 GPA and received the Chancellor’s Award for outstanding academic performance.

Professional Experience: Over the past two years, I have worked as a research assistant at Genomics Lab, where I contributed to projects on gene editing and CRISPR technology. My responsibilities included conducting experiments, analyzing data, and presenting findings. Notably, I led a study on “CRISPR-Cas9 Applications in Disease Resistance,” which demonstrated a novel approach to enhancing plant immunity.

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General information about the department's psychology doctoral programs?

Visit our Graduate Program webpage. More specific information about your clinical science programs?

Visit our Clinical Science webpage.

Information about faculty research interest and ongoing projects? On the Clinical Science page is a list of clinical program faculty and a brief description of their research interests. Click on individual faculty's names for more information about their research interests, and a list of recent publications, or to download their CVs, and link to their personal or lab webpages.

Quantitative information about your program, such as admitted students' GPA, length of the program, internship placement and licensure rates, etc.? Download our Summary of Clinical Science Graduate Applicant and Student Data for statistical data about our applicants, admitted students, and graduates.

Information on how to apply to your program?

Visit our Application Information webpage.

Questions about the Program

What is your program's training model?

We follow the "clinical scientist" model of training. This means that we strongly emphasize empirical research. Our clinical training is intended to support research training, in the sense that good clinical researchers must have first-hand knowledge of the "subject" of their research.

Do you train your students in clinical work as well as research? Yes, clinical training is part of our program requirements, and all those who obtain clinical science Ph.D.s from our program also complete a 1-year internship.

How long does it take to complete the program?

About 78% of our students finish the program in 5-6 years, plus a 1-year internship. Fewer than 10% take longer than 8 years, typically because of a planned interruption in their studies.

What do students do when they graduate?

40% of our 51 graduates over the past 10 years have taken an academic position involving teaching, research, or both. 49% of our graduates are employed in university or VA medical centers where their positions involve a combination of research, training, and direct service provision. Five graduates are in private practice.

Do your students get licensed as clinical psychologists?

Of the 39 students who graduated between 2 and 10 years ago, 34 are licensed (87%). The remaining 5 students are in academic settings that do not require licensure. Of students who graduated less than 2 years ago, all are currently accruing the postdoctoral hours required for licensure in their respective states.

Questions about the Application Process

What are the requirements for admission into your program?

The minimum requirements of the Graduate College are a U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or an equivalent degree from another country as determined by the Office of Admissions and a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.00, or foreign equivalent as determined by the Office of Admissions. More detailed information about the qualifications of our applicants and those who are admitted is provided below.

What qualities and qualifications do you look for in a student?

We look for students who: 1. want to pursue a research career

2. generally know the area they wish to research

3. have experience in empirical research (preferably, but not necessarily, psychological research)

4. have research interests that are a good "fit" with one of our faculty members‚ 5. have strong and specific letters of recommendation from their research mentor(s) 6. have a strong science/mathematics background, including in particular biology, chemistry, and statistics 7. have a strong academic record (GPA)

How do you select students for admission to your program?

We have a research mentor-based system of training, so students are admitted primarily to work with a particular faculty member. Therefore, "fit" with a faculty member's research interests is extremely important in selecting new students. We are unable to accept even highly qualified students if their research interests do not match with our current faculty's interests.

How can I strengthen my application to increase my chance of being admitted?

Being directly involved with empirical research is the single most important way to strengthen your application.

What is the typical GPA for the students you admit?

In recent years, our admitted students' average GPA is ~3.7. Note - we no longer require GRE and do not use GRE scores in admissions decisions.

Do I need to take the GRE Psychology subject test?

No, the GRE Psychology subject test is not required. However, if you were NOT a psychology major, then doing well on the Psychology subject test is a good way to document that your lack of a psychology background will not be an impediment to your succeeding in our program.

My junior-senior grades and my grades in Psychology are strong, but my overall GPA isn't great. How much will this hurt my chances of being admitted? It depends. If you have good research experience, and your research mentor writes you a strong letter of recommendation, poor grades in your first 2 years of college probably won't hurt you too much. However, the more aspects of your application that are not "top-tier," the more you're at a disadvantage. Remember, our top applicants are quite strong on all dimensions, and they're your competition.

I got a job after college and haven't done any research since then; is that OK? There's certainly nothing wrong with this as long as you still can get a strong letter of recommendation from your former research advisor. However, current involvement in research is better than past involvement, because that conveys that you have an ongoing research interest that you wish to pursue in graduate school. Most, if not all, of our successful applicants are involved in research at the time of application.

Do you accept applicants who did not major in Psychology?

Yes, we do. Although most of our applicants were psychology majors, many are not.

Can I start the Ph.D. program in the spring or summer?

No, we only accept applications for beginning in the fall semester.

Do you take part-time students?

No, our program is for full-time students only.

Can I complete the program by taking only evening and weekend classes?

No, very few classes are offered evenings and weekends.

Do you admit students into a master's degree program?

No, we only accept students into our Ph.D. program, although most of our students do obtain an MA degree on the way to their doctoral degree.

What does the program cost on a yearly basis?

See Program Costs Table.

Is financial aid available? If so, how do I apply for it?

Yes, all admitted applicants are guaranteed funding for 5 years. You do not need to do anything to apply for financial aid beyond completing the application for admission. All graduate students are supported for at least five years if they remain in good standing. Support includes a stipend of $18,816 plus a tuition scholarship, plus 25% of mandatory fees (~$254). In addition, two months of summer support is normally provided.

Are the following people appropriate to write letters of recommendation? 

For International Students :

Do you accept international students?

Yes; about 10% of our students are international students.

Do international students have to take the GRE?

No. We do not require the GRE for admission to the program.

Are there additional admission requirements for international students?

Yes, international students must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language).

For Students with a Master's Degree

Will my credits transfer?

Most likely some credits will transfer, but there is no guarantee of this. Admitted students must provide the syllabus of any course for which they would like transfer credit. The clinical-area faculty will evaluate the syllabus and qualifications of the instructor for comparability to one of our own courses (including electives), and will recommend transfer credit for those that are substantially the same. Typically, we accept 1 and occasionally up to 2 semesters of coursework for transfer. Please see the following website for the Graduate College's rules regarding: transfer credit (https://www.grad.uiowa.edu/manual-part-1-section-v-credits)

Will I have to write another thesis?

No, we don't require a thesis. We also don't require a Master's degree, although most of our students complete the requirements and get an MA degree. However, we do require that all new students, regardless of their background, complete a research project as described in the Graduate Student Handbook . See pages 2, 6-7.

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  5. FREE 10+ Bachelor Thesis Proposal Samples in PDF

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  6. Bachelor Thesis

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COMMENTS

  1. Senior Thesis Examples

    Senior Thesis Examples. Graduating seniors in Biological Sciences have the option of submitting a senior thesis for consideration for Honors and Research Prizes . Below are some examples of particularly outstanding theses from recent years (pdf): Sledd Thesis. Yu Thesis.

  2. Biological Sciences thesis and dissertation collection

    Biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles for use in anti-corrosion and anti-fouling agents . Ahmed, Dina (The University of Edinburgh, 2024-05-06) The growing interest in nanoparticles as potent anti-microbial agents, particularly in industries like the marine sector, holds significant importance. Bio-fouling and corrosion prevention and ...

  3. Thesis Guidelines

    The format of the final copy should follow these guidelines: Cover Page (sample): Title; student's name; supervisor's name; date of submission; 3 signature lines at bottom right (Research Supervisor, DUS, Reader). Please follow the format and language of the sample. Abstract Page: single-spaced, roughly 250 words. Thesis should be double-spaced.

  4. Molecular Biosciences Theses and Dissertations

    Theses/Dissertations from 2022. PDF. Regulation of the Heat Shock Response via Lysine Acetyltransferase CBP-1 and in Neurodegenerative Disease in Caenorhabditis elegans, Lindsey N. Barrett. PDF. Determining the Role of Dendritic Cells During Response to Treatment with Paclitaxel/Anti-TIM-3, Alycia Gardner. PDF.

  5. Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2022-2023

    Online 1. A Predictive Model of Human Transcriptional Activators and Repressors [2023] Select. Liongson, Ivan (Author) May 4, 2023. Description. Book. Summary. The ability to predict which protein sequences can act as transcriptional activators or repressors is important for understanding the function of human and viral transcription factors ...

  6. Biological Sciences Undergraduate Honors Theses

    Molar Macrowear as a Proxy for Age in a Captive Sample of Papio hamadryas, Lauren Conrad. PDF. Self-Confidence and Hormonal Contraceptive Use, Abigail Doran. PDF. The Effects of Salt and Temperature on Three Methanogen Species: Implications for Mars, Katy Dunlap. PDF. Early Life Stress Predicts Future Conduct Disorder in Adolescents, Savannah ...

  7. PDF Integrative Biology Senior Thesis Guide

    Integrative Biology Senior Thesis Guide IB theses come from across the face of biology - from tropical ecology to medical immunology - so there ... for example, done their research over their Soph-Jnr summer and done something else over their Jnr-Snr summer). Unlike some other concentrations, which require "Thesis ...

  8. How to Tackle Your Bachelor's or Master's Thesis in Science* Without

    This was for example the case in my bachelor's thesis. As the bachelor's thesis at my university needed to be conducted in a time frame of 12 weeks, I was working together with a PhD student collecting data (I was mainly staining brain sections, imaged them, and counted cells!). ... She completed her undergrad studies in biology in 2017 and ...

  9. Undergraduate Thesis

    The School of Biological Sciences offers a senior thesis option that is available for all students. As part of this experience, students will learn about the proper way to conduct research in a classroom setting, conduct an independent research project, and communicate their results. The thesis, a written description of your work, includes the ...

  10. Example Dissertation Titles

    Plant Sciences. "Scrambled Genomes": examining the methodology and goals of the Sc2.0 synthetic genome project. Engineering C4 Rice: Molecular Targets and Progress so far. Is Trehalose-6-phosphate a central regulator of plant carbon partitioning?

  11. BS Thesis Guidelines and Timeline

    Description of the BS thesis. BS students will write a thesis based on original research. The topic must be a current issue in Biology, including basic science, medicine, and other applied fields, be described in a compelling thesis proposal, and be supported by a willing and appropriate Mentor.

  12. Honors Thesis Examples

    Honors Thesis Examples. EBIO student's Honors Thesis submissions from past years are archived here with abstracts from the student's respective papers. Peruse several of the submissions to get a sense of the area's of study our students delve into for their Honors Thesis projects. Published Examples.

  13. PDF Biology Department

    [THESIS TITLE in 24pt.] [Author's full name in 16pt.] An Undergraduate thesis submitted to the Faculty of the department of biology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts/Science in Biology/Biochemistry Boston College Morrissey College of Arts and Sciences [month and year of acceptance of thesis]

  14. PDF Undergraduate Thesis in Biology

    Seed dormancy and germination in the summer annual Galeopsis speciosa. LM KARLSSON, JAL ERICSSON, & P MILBERG IFM Biology, Division of Ecology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. Correspondence: LM Karlsson, IFM Biology, Division of Ecology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. E-mail: [email protected].

  15. Biomedical Science Theses and Dissertations

    Follow. Theses/Dissertations from 2023 PDF. Gluten Free Diet Ameliorates SI Enteropathy in IGA Deficient Mice, Ryan Albert William Ball. PDF. Progressive Neurochemical, Neuroinflammatory and Cognitive Deficits in an Experimental Model of Gulf War Illness, Hannah Elizabeth Burzynski. PDF

  16. Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples

    Prize-Winning Thesis and Dissertation Examples. Published on September 9, 2022 by Tegan George.Revised on July 18, 2023. It can be difficult to know where to start when writing your thesis or dissertation.One way to come up with some ideas or maybe even combat writer's block is to check out previous work done by other students on a similar thesis or dissertation topic to yours.

  17. Bachelor's thesis in Biology

    Teacher education: 45 CP in Biology. (4) Students are allowed 12 weeks to complete their Bachelor's thesis. The thesis is assessed by two referees. As an exception and upon reasoned request, the examining board may grant a one-time prolongation of maximum four weeks. (5) The Bachelor's thesis may be an individual effort or a group effort of ...

  18. Deep Learning-Enabled Integrated Measurements of Immune Signaling in

    However, Polaris' impact extends beyond the scope of this work to the broader spatial biology field as its spot detection and gene decoding capabilities generalize to data sets from a variety of sample types and imaging modalities.

  19. Biology Bachelor's Theses

    Gracles S. Dela Rosa, Justine Winna Go, and Aliyah Gynelle A. Viyar. Molecular docking studies on the interaction of the Cryptosporidium parvum proteins, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CpCDPK1), with selected plant compounds, Ivan Gregg O. Samson and Rupert C. Quijano Jr.

  20. Theses

    In the bachelor's and master's degree courses in biology and biochemistry, there is a so-called "methods course" before the thesis. This is carried out by the supervisor with whom the thesis is being carried out and, among other things, topic-specific working methods that are required for the respective thesis are learned.

  21. Molecular and Cellular Biology Masters Theses Collection

    Theses from 2010 PDF. The Protective Effects A Full-term Pregnancy Plays Against Mammary Carcinoma, Matthew p.Carter, Molecular & Cellular Biology. PDF. Analysis Of An Actin Binding Guanine Exchange Factor, Gef8, And Actin Depolymerizing Factor In Arabidopsis Thaliana., Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Molecular & Cellular Biology PDF

  22. MIT Theses

    MIT's DSpace contains more than 58,000 theses completed at MIT dating as far back as the mid 1800's. Theses in this collection have been scanned by the MIT Libraries or submitted in electronic format by thesis authors. Since 2004 all new Masters and Ph.D. theses are scanned and added to this collection after degrees are awarded.

  23. Biochemistry Honors Theses and Research Papers

    Biochemistry is the basic science which has as its goal an explanation of life processes in physical and chemical terms. Founded in 1883, today's Department of Biochemistry emphasizes cellular regulation, molecular genetics, protein structure, hormone action, virology, and developmental biology. The undergraduate biochemistry major fits the needs of both the student who wishes to terminate ...

  24. Bachelor theses

    "The Bachelor thesis is a unique authorial body of the text as well as is the Master thesis. The Introduction or even parts of the Introduction of the Master thesis may not be identical to Bachelor thesis. In this case, it would be auto-plagiarism. When you are writing two different texts, in this case, to pursue two different academic degrees ...

  25. Your Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing a Thesis Research Topic.

    Narrowing down your thesis research topic. Now you've read around the topic, it's time to narrow down your ideas so you can craft your final question. For example, when it came to my undergraduate thesis, I knew I wanted to write about Ancient Greek religion and I was interested in the topic of goddesses. So, I:

  26. Bachelor of Science

    A Bachelor of Science (BS, BSc, B. sc., SB, or ScB; from the Latin scientiae baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree that is awarded for programs that generally last three to five years.. The first university to admit a student to the degree of Bachelor of Science was the University of London in 1860. In the United States, the Lawrence Scientific School first conferred the degree in 1851 ...

  27. Statement of Purpose for Biology [Edit & Download], Pdf

    Academic Background: I completed my Bachelor's in Biological Sciences at UC Berkeley, focusing on genetics, molecular biology, and biochemistry. My senior thesis, "Genetic Modifications to Improve Crop Resistance," provided me with a strong foundation in genetic engineering and its applications.

  28. Clinical Science F.A.Q.

    The minimum requirements of the Graduate College are a U.S. bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, or an equivalent degree from another country as determined by the Office of Admissions and a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.00, or foreign equivalent as determined by the Office of Admissions.

  29. Melissa Cesaire

    Melissa holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology focusing on Developmental Biology and Genetics from Penn State University. ... she completed her undergraduate thesis exploring researchers' views ...

  30. Thesis

    A bachelor's thesis is often 40-60 pages long, a diploma thesis and a master's thesis usually 60-100. The required submission for a doctorate is called a Dissertation or Doktorarbeit . The submission for a Habilitation , which is an academic qualification, not an academic degree, is called Habilitationsschrift , not Habilitationsarbeit .