AtoZsummary.com

The Homework Machine- Summary & Analysis

Table of Contents

About the Poem “The Homework Machine” 

Themes of the homework machine .

The themes of the poem “The Homework Machine” by Shel Silverstein are:

  • The dangers of relying on technology ➤ The poem suggests that if we rely too much on technology to do our work for us, we may lose the ability to think for ourselves and learn.
  • The importance of hard work ➤ The poem also suggests that there is no substitute for hard work. Even if we had a machine to do our homework for us, we would not really be learning anything.
  • The importance of creativity and imagination ➤ The poem ends with the speaker imagining a world where everyone is the same and no one is creative. This suggests that creativity and imagination are essential for a fulfilling life.

“ The Homework Machine ” Poem by Shel Silverstein

The Homework Machine, Oh, the Homework Machine, Most perfect contraption that’s ever been seen. Just put in your homework, then drop in a dime, Snap on the switch, and in ten seconds’ time, Your homework comes out, quick and clean as can be. Here it is- ‘nine plus four?’ and the answer is ‘three.’ Three? Oh me . . . I guess it’s not as perfect As I thought it would be.

The Homework Machine Summary & Analysis

The Homework Machine by Shel Silverstein is a humorous and cautionary poem about the dangers of relying on machines to do your work for you.

The poem begins with the speaker describing the “Homework Machine” as the “most perfect contraption that’s ever been seen.” The speaker is excited about the machine because it can do your homework for you. All you have to do is put in your homework, drop in a dime, and snap on the switch. In ten seconds, your homework will be done, “quick and clean as can be.”

The speaker is eager to try out the machine, so they put in their math homework and drop in a dime. They snap on the switch, and in ten seconds, their homework is done. The speaker is thrilled. They can now spend their time doing other things, like playing or watching TV.

However, the speaker’s excitement is short-lived. When they look at their homework, they realize that the machine has given them the wrong answer to a math problem. The answer to “nine plus four” is three, which is obviously incorrect.

The speaker is disappointed and frustrated. They realize that the Homework Machine is not as perfect as they thought it was. They also realize that they need to learn to do their own homework, even if it is difficult.

The poem ends with the speaker realizing that they “guess it’s not as perfect / As I thought it would be.” This line is a reminder that we should not rely on machines to do everything for us. We need to learn how to think for ourselves and do things on our own.

FAQs from The Homework Machine

What is the story of the homework machine.

A kid finds a homework machine, but it gives them the wrong answer to a math problem, so they learn that it’s important to do their own work.

What is the central idea of the poem homework?

The central idea of the poem “The Homework Machine” is that it is important to learn to do your own work, even if it is difficult.

Other Free Summaries:

The Bells Summary & Analysis

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

a to z

poetryverse

PoetryVerse

Shel Silverstein

The homework machine.

The Homework Machine, Oh, the Homework Machine, Most perfect contraption that's ever been seen. Just put in your homework, then drop in a dime, Snap on the switch, and in ten seconds' time, Your homework comes out, quick and clean as can be. Here it is— 'nine plus four?' and the answer is 'three.' Three? Oh me . . . I guess it's not as perfect As I thought it would be.

homework machine point of view

Feel free to be first to leave comment.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.

institution icon

  • Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Access options

The Homework Machine (review)

  • Loretta Gaffney
  • Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Volume 59, Number 7, March 2006
  • pp. 312-313
  • 10.1353/bcc.2006.0172
  • View Citation

Related Content

Additional Information

pdf

Project MUSE Mission

Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves.

MUSE logo

2715 North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland, USA 21218

+1 (410) 516-6989 [email protected]

©2024 Project MUSE. Produced by Johns Hopkins University Press in collaboration with The Sheridan Libraries.

Now and Always, The Trusted Content Your Research Requires

Project MUSE logo

Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus

Profile Picture

  • ADMIN AREA MY BOOKSHELF MY DASHBOARD MY PROFILE SIGN OUT SIGN IN

avatar

THE HOMEWORK MACHINE

by Dan Gutman ‧ RELEASE DATE: March 1, 2006

When fifth-graders Judy, Sam and Kelsey discover their classmate Brenton Damagatchi’s homework machine, they think they are on to a good thing and begin to visit him regularly after school. Alphabetically seated at the same table, the brilliant Asian-American computer geek, hardworking, high-achieving African-American girl, troubled army brat and ditzy girl with pink hair would seem to have nothing in common. (They would also seem to be stereotypes, but young readers won’t mind.) But they share an aversion to the time-consuming grind of after-school work. Their use of the machine doesn’t lead to learning—as a surprise spring quiz demonstrates—but it does lead to new friendships and new interests. The events of their year are told chronologically in individual depositions to the police. In spite of the numerous voices, the story is easy to follow, and the change in Sam, especially, is clear, as he discovers talents beyond coolness thanks to a new interest in chess. Middle-grade readers may find one part of this story upsettingly realistic and the clearly stated moral not what they had hoped to hear, but the generally humorous approach will make the lesson go down easily. (Fiction. 8-11)

Pub Date: March 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-689-87678-5

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2006

CHILDREN'S SOCIAL THEMES

Share your opinion of this book

More by Dan Gutman

RUTH BADER GINSBURG COULDN'T DRIVE?

BOOK REVIEW

by Dan Gutman ; illustrated by Allison Steinfeld

AMELIA EARHART IS ON THE MOON?

by Dan Gutman

TUCK EVERLASTING

TUCK EVERLASTING

by Natalie Babbitt ‧ RELEASE DATE: Nov. 1, 1975

However the compelling fitness of theme and event and the apt but unexpected imagery (the opening sentences compare the...

At a time when death has become an acceptable, even voguish subject in children's fiction, Natalie Babbitt comes through with a stylistic gem about living forever. 

Protected Winnie, the ten-year-old heroine, is not immortal, but when she comes upon young Jesse Tuck drinking from a secret spring in her parents' woods, she finds herself involved with a family who, having innocently drunk the same water some 87 years earlier, haven't aged a moment since. Though the mood is delicate, there is no lack of action, with the Tucks (previously suspected of witchcraft) now pursued for kidnapping Winnie; Mae Tuck, the middle aged mother, striking and killing a stranger who is onto their secret and would sell the water; and Winnie taking Mae's place in prison so that the Tucks can get away before she is hanged from the neck until....? Though Babbitt makes the family a sad one, most of their reasons for discontent are circumstantial and there isn't a great deal of wisdom to be gleaned from their fate or Winnie's decision not to share it. 

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1975

ISBN: 0312369816

Page Count: 164

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: April 13, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1975

CHILDREN'S SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY | CHILDREN'S SOCIAL THEMES

More by Natalie Babbitt

THE MOON OVER HIGH STREET

by Natalie Babbitt

JACK PLANK TELLS TALES

by Valerie Worth & illustrated by Natalie Babbitt

MUSTACHES FOR MADDIE

MUSTACHES FOR MADDIE

by Chad Morris & Shelly Brown ‧ RELEASE DATE: Oct. 3, 2017

Medically, both squicky and hopeful; emotionally, unbelievably squeaky-clean.

A 12-year-old copes with a brain tumor.

Maddie likes potatoes and fake mustaches. Kids at school are nice (except one whom readers will see instantly is a bully); soon they’ll get to perform Shakespeare scenes in a unit they’ve all been looking forward to. But recent dysfunctions in Maddie’s arm and leg mean, stunningly, that she has a brain tumor. She has two surgeries, the first successful, the second taking place after the book’s end, leaving readers hanging. The tumor’s not malignant, but it—or the surgeries—could cause sight loss, personality change, or death. The descriptions of surgery aren’t for the faint of heart. The authors—parents of a real-life Maddie who really had a brain tumor—imbue fictional Maddie’s first-person narration with quirky turns of phrase (“For the love of potatoes!”) and whimsy (she imagines her medical battles as epic fantasy fights and pretends MRI stands for Mustard Rat from Indiana or Mustaches Rock Importantly), but they also portray her as a model sick kid. She’s frightened but never acts out, snaps, or resists. Her most frequent commentary about the tumor, having her skull opened, and the possibility of death is “Boo” or “Super boo.” She even shoulders the bully’s redemption. Maddie and most characters are white; one cringe-inducing hallucinatory surgery dream involves “chanting island natives” and a “witch doctor lady.”

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62972-330-3

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Shadow Mountain

Review Posted Online: Aug. 1, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2017

CHILDREN'S SOCIAL THEMES | CHILDREN'S HEALTH & DAILY LIVING

More by Chad Morris

THE WILD JOURNEY OF JUNIPER BERRY

by Chad Morris & Shelly Brown

VIRTUALLY ME

by Chad Morris & Shelly Brown ; illustrated by Garth Bruner

WILLA AND THE WHALE

  • Discover Books Fiction Thriller & Suspense Mystery & Detective Romance Science Fiction & Fantasy Nonfiction Biography & Memoir Teens & Young Adult Children's
  • News & Features Bestsellers Book Lists Profiles Perspectives Awards Seen & Heard Book to Screen Kirkus TV videos In the News
  • Kirkus Prize Winners & Finalists About the Kirkus Prize Kirkus Prize Judges
  • Magazine Current Issue All Issues Manage My Subscription Subscribe
  • Writers’ Center Hire a Professional Book Editor Get Your Book Reviewed Advertise Your Book Launch a Pro Connect Author Page Learn About The Book Industry
  • More Kirkus Diversity Collections Kirkus Pro Connect My Account/Login
  • About Kirkus History Our Team Contest FAQ Press Center Info For Publishers
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Reprints, Permission & Excerpting Policy

© Copyright 2024 Kirkus Media LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Go To Top

Popular in this Genre

Close Quickview

Hey there, book lover.

We’re glad you found a book that interests you!

Please select an existing bookshelf

Create a new bookshelf.

We can’t wait for you to join Kirkus!

Please sign up to continue.

It’s free and takes less than 10 seconds!

Already have an account? Log in.

Sign in with Google

Trouble signing in? Retrieve credentials.

Almost there!

  • Industry Professional

Welcome Back!

Sign in using your Kirkus account

Contact us: 1-800-316-9361 or email [email protected].

Don’t fret. We’ll find you.

Magazine Subscribers ( How to Find Your Reader Number )

If You’ve Purchased Author Services

Don’t have an account yet? Sign Up.

homework machine point of view

Join our mailing list!

The Homework Machine

The Homework Machine

Table of contents, about the book, about the author.

Dan Gutman

Dan Gutman hated to read when he was a kid. Then he grew up. Now he writes cool books like The Kid Who Ran for President ; Honus & Me ; The Million Dollar Shot ; Race for the Sky ; and The Edison Mystery: Qwerty Stevens, Back in Time . If you want to learn more about Dan or his books, stop by his website at DanGutman.com.

Product Details

  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (June 26, 2007)
  • Length: 176 pages
  • ISBN13: 9780689876790
  • Grades: 3 - 7
  • Ages: 8 - 12
  • Fountas & Pinnell™ R These books have been officially leveled by using the F&P Text Level Gradient™ Leveling System

Browse Related Books

  • Age 12 and Up
  • Children's Fiction > Social Themes > Adolescence & Coming of Age
  • Children's Fiction > Social Situations > Adolescence
  • Children's Fiction > School & Education
  • Children's Fiction > Humorous Stories

Awards and Honors

  • ILA/CBC Children's Choices
  • Maud Hart Lovelace Award Nominee (MN)
  • Booklist Editors' Choice
  • South Carolina Picture Book Award Nominee
  • Iowa Children's Choice Award Nominee
  • Young Hoosier Book Award Nominee (IN)
  • Indian Paintbrush Book Award Nominee (WY)
  • Chicago Public Library's Best of the Best
  • Nutmeg Book Award Nominee (CT)
  • Colorado Children's Book Award Master List
  • Child Magazine's Guide to Top Books, Videos and Software of the Year
  • Pacific Northwest Young Reader's Choice Award Master List
  • Volunteer State Book Award Nominee (TN)
  • Virginia Readers' Choice Award List
  • Prairie Pasque Award Nominee (SD)
  • Land of Enchantment RoadRunner Award Nominee (NM)
  • Nene Award Nominee (HI)
  • Sunshine State Young Readers' Award List (FL)
  • Massachusetts Children's Book Award Nominee
  • Golden Sower Award (NE)
  • Sasquatch Book Award Nominee (WA)

Resources and Downloads

High resolution images.

  • Book Cover Image (jpg): The Homework Machine Trade Paperback 9780689876790 (2.4 MB)

Get our latest staff recommendations, award news and digital catalog links right to your inbox.

More books from this author: Dan Gutman

Dan Gutman Collection (Boxed Set)

More to Explore

Limited Time eBook Deals

Limited Time eBook Deals

Check out this month's discounted reads.

Our Summer Reading Recommendations

Our Summer Reading Recommendations

Red-hot romances, poolside fiction, and blockbuster picks, oh my! Start reading the hottest books of the summer.

This Month's New Releases

This Month's New Releases

From heart-pounding thrillers to poignant memoirs and everything in between, check out what's new this month.

Tell us what you’d like to receive below. Or visit our preference center to select the newsletter(s) you prefer.

Academic Newsletter

Please specify your subject area(s):

homework machine point of view

  • Children's Books
  • Growing Up & Facts of Life

Amazon prime logo

Enjoy fast, free delivery, exclusive deals, and award-winning movies & TV shows with Prime Try Prime and start saving today with fast, free delivery

Amazon Prime includes:

Fast, FREE Delivery is available to Prime members. To join, select "Try Amazon Prime and start saving today with Fast, FREE Delivery" below the Add to Cart button.

  • Cardmembers earn 5% Back at Amazon.com with a Prime Credit Card.
  • Unlimited Free Two-Day Delivery
  • Streaming of thousands of movies and TV shows with limited ads on Prime Video.
  • A Kindle book to borrow for free each month - with no due dates
  • Listen to over 2 million songs and hundreds of playlists
  • Unlimited photo storage with anywhere access

Important:  Your credit card will NOT be charged when you start your free trial or if you cancel during the trial period. If you're happy with Amazon Prime, do nothing. At the end of the free trial, your membership will automatically upgrade to a monthly membership.

Audible Logo

Buy new: .savingPriceOverride { color:#CC0C39!important; font-weight: 300!important; } .reinventMobileHeaderPrice { font-weight: 400; } #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div .reinventPriceSavingsPercentageMargin, #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div .reinventPricePriceToPayMargin { margin-right: 4px; } $7.99 $ 7 . 99 FREE delivery Sunday, June 2 on orders shipped by Amazon over $35 Ships from: Amazon.com Sold by: Amazon.com

Return this item for free.

Free returns are available for the shipping address you chose. You can return the item for any reason in new and unused condition: no shipping charges

  • Go to your orders and start the return
  • Select the return method

Save with Used - Good .savingPriceOverride { color:#CC0C39!important; font-weight: 300!important; } .reinventMobileHeaderPrice { font-weight: 400; } #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div .reinventPriceSavingsPercentageMargin, #apex_offerDisplay_mobile_feature_div .reinventPricePriceToPayMargin { margin-right: 4px; } $5.98 $ 5 . 98 FREE delivery Monday, June 3 on orders shipped by Amazon over $35 Ships from: Amazon Sold by: Jenson Books Inc

Kindle app logo image

Download the free Kindle app and start reading Kindle books instantly on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required .

Read instantly on your browser with Kindle for Web.

Using your mobile phone camera - scan the code below and download the Kindle app.

QR code to download the Kindle App

Image Unavailable

The Homework Machine

  • To view this video download Flash Player

homework machine point of view

Follow the author

Dan Gutman

The Homework Machine Paperback – June 26, 2007

Purchase options and add-ons.

  • Book 1 of 2 The Homework Machine
  • Print length 176 pages
  • Language English
  • Grade level 3 - 7
  • Lexile measure 680L
  • Dimensions 5.13 x 0.5 x 7.63 inches
  • Publisher Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date June 26, 2007
  • ISBN-10 9780689876790
  • ISBN-13 978-0689876790
  • See all details

The Amazon Book Review

Frequently bought together

The Homework Machine

More items to explore

The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread

Editorial Reviews

About the author, excerpt. © reprinted by permission. all rights reserved., the homework machine, aladdin paperbacks.

Continues... Excerpted from The Homework Machine by Dan Gutman Copyright © 2007 by Dan Gutman. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ 0689876793
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (June 26, 2007)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 176 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 9780689876790
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0689876790
  • Reading age ‏ : ‎ 8 - 11 years, from customers
  • Lexile measure ‏ : ‎ 680L
  • Grade level ‏ : ‎ 3 - 7
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 3.84 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.13 x 0.5 x 7.63 inches
  • #164 in Children's Values Books
  • #407 in Children's School Issues
  • #800 in Children's Friendship Books

About the author

I was born in a log cabin in Illinois and used to write by candlelight with a piece of chalk on a shovel. Oh, wait a minute. That was Abraham Lincoln.

Actually, I’m a children's book author. I’ve written more than 170 books for kids from kindergarten up to middle school.

For the little ones, I write picture books like "Rappy the Raptor," about a rapping raptor named Rappy, who raps.

For beginning readers, I write "My Weird School," about some kids who go to a school in which all the grownups are crazy. Thirty-one million copies have been sold. I also write “Wait! WHAT?” a series of biographies that focus on the unusual aspects of people like Albert Einstein, Amelia Earhart, Muhammad Ali, and Teddy Roosevelt.

For middle-graders, I write the baseball card adventure series, about a boy who has the power to travel through time using a baseball card like a time machine. He goes on adventures with players like Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays, and others.

For advanced readers, I write "The Genius Files," "Flashback Four,” “Houdini and Me” and others.

If you’d like to find out more, visit my web site (www.dangutman.com), my Facebook fan page, and follow me on Twitter and Instagram @dangutmanbooks.

Customer reviews

Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness.

  • Sort reviews by Top reviews Most recent Top reviews

Top reviews from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. please try again later..

homework machine point of view

Top reviews from other countries

homework machine point of view

  • Amazon Newsletter
  • About Amazon
  • Accessibility
  • Sustainability
  • Press Center
  • Investor Relations
  • Amazon Devices
  • Amazon Science
  • Sell on Amazon
  • Sell apps on Amazon
  • Supply to Amazon
  • Protect & Build Your Brand
  • Become an Affiliate
  • Become a Delivery Driver
  • Start a Package Delivery Business
  • Advertise Your Products
  • Self-Publish with Us
  • Become an Amazon Hub Partner
  • › See More Ways to Make Money
  • Amazon Visa
  • Amazon Store Card
  • Amazon Secured Card
  • Amazon Business Card
  • Shop with Points
  • Credit Card Marketplace
  • Reload Your Balance
  • Amazon Currency Converter
  • Your Account
  • Your Orders
  • Shipping Rates & Policies
  • Amazon Prime
  • Returns & Replacements
  • Manage Your Content and Devices
  • Recalls and Product Safety Alerts
  • Conditions of Use
  • Privacy Notice
  • Consumer Health Data Privacy Disclosure
  • Your Ads Privacy Choices

The Homework Machine

The Homework Machine

Buy from other retailers, what's this book about.

DOING HOMEWORK BECOMES A THING OF THE PAST The unlikely foursome made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher’s pet, and a slacker – Brenton, Sam Snick, Judy and Kelsey, respectively, – are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together, attracting a lot of attention. And attention is exactly what you don’t want when you are keeping a secret. Before long, members of the D Squad, as they are called at school are getting strange Instant Messages from a shady guy named Milner; their teacher, Miss Rasmussen, is calling private meetings with each of them and giving them pop tests that they are failing; and someone has leaked the possibility of a homework machine to the school newspaper. Just when the D Squad thinks things can’t get any more out of control, Belch becomes much more powerful than they ever imagined. Soon the kids are in a race against their own creation, and the loser could end up in jail…or worse!

What Kind of Book is .css-1msjh1x{font-style:italic;} The Homework Machine

Book lists that include this book.

Spy School British Invasion

The Creative Behind the Book

Dan Gutman is the New York Times bestselling author of the Genius Files series; the Baseball Card Adventure series, which has sold more than 1.5 million copies around the world; and the My Weird School series, which has sold more than 12 million copies. Thanks to his many fans who voted in their classrooms, Dan has received nineteen state book awards and ninety-two state book award nominations. He lives in New York City with his wife, Nina. You can visit him online at www.dangutman.com.

What Has Dan Gutman Said About This Book

Nothing yet! Let Dan Gutman know that you want to hear from them about their book.

More Books by Dan Gutman

Casey Back at Bat

Discover All the Books in the The Homework Machine Series

Return of the Homework Machine

Other Books You Might Enjoy If You Liked This Book

Katie and the Cupcake Cure

Book Details

Contribute to this page.

More than halfway there—keep going!

Just the barebones.

  • Help Center
  • Gift a Book Club
  • Beautiful Collections
  • Schedule Demo

Book Platform

  • Find a Book
  • Reading App
  • Community Editors

Authors & Illustrators

  • Get Your Book Reviewed
  • Submit Original Work

Follow Bookroo

Instagram

Lesson Planet

  • Share on Facebook
  • Tweet This Resource
  • Pin This Resource

The Homework Machine: Novel Study Study Guide

The Homework Machine: Novel Study

This the homework machine: novel study study guide also includes:.

  • Join to access all included materials

Do opposites really attract? The D Squad in The Homework Machine  includes of a quad of opposites. The group, made up of a teacher's pet, a geek, a class clown, and a slacker, make use of a machine to do their homework. In response to the story, scholars complete sentences with vocabulary words, answer comprehension questions, and analyze a quote to show what they know.

Additional Tags

Instructional ideas.

  • Assign learners to invent and write about a machine to make life easier
  • Integrate other subjects with the study of the Colorado River and forest fires

Classroom Considerations

  • Includes only a preview of a full novel study
  • Requires knowledge of adjectives
  • Incorporates literary elements such as personification, alliteration, and simile
  • Contains study of a quote from Abraham Lincoln
  • Does not provide sample work or answers

Common Core

Start your free trial.

Save time and discover engaging curriculum for your classroom. Reviewed and rated by trusted, credentialed teachers.

  • Collection Types
  • Activities & Projects
  • Assessments
  • Graphics & Images
  • Handouts & References
  • Interactives
  • Lab Resources
  • Learning Games
  • Lesson Plans
  • Presentations
  • Primary Sources
  • Printables & Templates
  • Professional Documents
  • Study Guides
  • Instructional Videos
  • Performance Tasks
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Writing Prompts
  • Constructed Response Items
  • AP Test Preps
  • Lesson Planet Articles
  • Online Courses
  • Interactive Whiteboards
  • Home Letters
  • Unknown Types
  • Stock Footages
  • All Resource Types

See similar resources:

"the most dangerous game" study guide, the outsiders study guide, study skills, pride and prejudice: question answer relationship strategy, where the red fern grows: question answer response strategy, roll of thunder, hear my cry: question answer response strategy, interpreting figurative language and answering selected response questions (chapter 4), study guide for missing may, study guide for tuck everlasting, study guide for bridge to terabithia.

  • Facebook Icon Round FB icon with f initial
  • Twitter Icon Twitter Logo
  • Instagram Icon Instagram Icon
  • Tumbler Icon Tumbler Icon

Get recommended reads, deals, and more from Hachette

By clicking ‘Sign Up,’ I acknowledge that I have read and agree to Hachette Book Group’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use

We have updated our Privacy Policy Please take a moment to review it. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the terms of our updated Privacy Policy.

The Homework Machine

The Homework Machine

Starting with a stern statement from the Grand Canyon, Arizona Police Chief Rebecca Fish, meet four fifth graders in big trouble. There's long-haired, rebellious, cool guy Sam Dawkins; fun-loving, unacademic, pink-haired Kelsey Donnelly, African American grind Judy Douglas, and friendless genius Brenton Damagatchi. The whole thing starts because Sam is anti-homework, especially the daily fill in-the-blank worksheets his first-year teacher Miss Rasmussen hands out. Sam is skeptical when Brenton claims he has programmed his computer to search the web and do all his homework each day, but it’s true. Soon the four seatmates are spending every afternoon in Brenton’s bedroom, printing out their daily assignments on the computer they nickname Belch. It can’t do any harm, right? The chronology and confession of their ill-fated escapade is related entirely through a series of transcripts, narrated by the four contrite kids, their parents, classmates, and Miss Rasmussen.

There are many interesting threads explored in this nimble story: keeping secrets, making friends, being popular, the morality of taking the easy way out, first crushes, the meaning of war, and even the loss of a parent. The setting of the Grand Canyon and sub-themes about playing chess, starting fads, and using a catapult will get kids looking up supporting information in books and on the Internet. Questions readers can think about as they read include: Which of the four main characters is most like or unlike you and why? Which one would or would not be your friend and why?

Reviewed by : JF.

Themes : DEATH. FRIENDSHIP. GRIEF. HUMOR.

Also Available From:

CRITICS HAVE SAID

  • “A dramatic and thought-provoking story with a strong message about honesty and friendship.” – Elaine E. Knight, School Library Journal
  • “Booktalkers will find this a natural, particularly for those hard-to-tempt readers whose preferred method of computer disposal involves a catapult and the Grand Canyon.” – Carolyn Phelan, Booklist
  • “Tucked in between the laughs are excellent messages about tolerance, honesty, and the importance of what the students’ teacher calls the “homework machine [that] already exists. It’s called your brain.” – Child Magazine
  • “Short chapters of alternating voices tell the story, which is funny in some places, but is not without intense and sometimes sad moments.” – Susie Wilde, Children

The Homework Machine

Guide cover image

50 pages • 1 hour read

A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality Study Guides with detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, and more.

Chapter Summaries & Analyses

Introduction-Chapter 2

Chapters 3-4

Chapters 5-6

Chapters 7-8

Chapters 9-10

Character Analysis

Symbols & Motifs

Important Quotes

Essay Topics

Discussion Questions

Chapters 5-6 Chapter Summaries & Analyses

Chapter 5 summary: january.

Snik’s family finds out on New Year’s Day that his father is being sent overseas. Snik is sad but stoic, “he was a soldier, right? You do what you’re ordered to do” (77). Before he leaves, Snik’s father gives him his chessboard and some books on chess.

Snik gets an email from his father, who is stationed in the Middle East, asking Snik, “how about a game of chess?” (81), with details of a website they can use. The codes look complicated, but, after some hesitation, Snik takes up the challenge and starts a remote chess game with his father.

Get access to this full Study Guide and much more!

  • 7,750+ In-Depth Study Guides
  • 4,800+ Quick-Read Plot Summaries
  • Downloadable PDFs

At school, Snik gets annoyed with “this jerk” (83) Ronnie Teotwawki , who asks Snik why he is hanging around with Brenton. Snik tells Ronnie to mind his own business and threatens to “bust his head open” (83) if he doesn’t stop snooping.

Judy is upset that Snik’s dad is being sent to the Middle East, but she is quick to point out that she and Snik are not best friends and says Snik is all “gung-ho GI Joe about it” (78).

The SuperSummary difference

  • 8x more resources than SparkNotes and CliffsNotes combined
  • Study Guides you won ' t find anywhere else
  • 175 + new titles every month

blurred text

Don't Miss Out!

Access Study Guide Now

Related Titles

By Dan Gutman

Guide cover image

The Kid Who Ran for President

Featured Collections

View Collection

Laugh-out-Loud Books

Popular Study Guides

Science & Nature

Truth & Lies

Point of View — First, Second, & Third Person

Malcolm McKinsey

Point of view definition

In English, the point of view is the narrator's position or perspective through which the story is being communicated. An author's point of view tells the reader who the person is experiencing the event or the topic of the writing.

All types of writing — fiction, song lyrics, nonfiction — are written from a point of view.

First, Second, And Third Person

First, second, and third person are the three main types of point of view.

First person is the I / we perspective

Second person is the you perspective

Third person is the she / he / they / it perspective

The author chooses a point of view to relate the story as if you were experiencing it, to force you into the story, or to allow the author to show different points of view.

Point of view examples

First Person POV (You are experiencing it) – " My heart leaped into my throat as I turned and saw a frightening shadow."

Second Person POV (Force you into the story) – " You turn and see a frightening shadow."

Third Person POV (Show different points of view) – " The children turned and saw the frightening shadow. They were unaware a cat had walked close to the low-hung lantern."

How to identify point of view

Identifying  a point of view in a writer's work can sometimes be challenging. The best way to find the point of view is to skip the dialogue, go to the narration, and look at the pronouns used in the narrative:

I, me, my, mine, myself, we, our, ours, ourselves — First person

You, your, yours, yourself — Second person

She, her, hers, herself, he, him, his, himself, they, them, themselves, their, theirs — Third person

You skip the dialogue because a character in any voice can speak and will almost always speak in first person voice.

Identifying a point of view

First person point of view

Usually, we speak in the first person when we talk about ourselves, our opinions, or our experiences.

Anytime a writer wants to share another person's life, you will see the first-person perspective. With a first-person view, every person reading the passage sees into the character's life.

First person pov

The first-person point of view is identified by singular pronouns such as;  me, my, I, mine, and myself  or plural first person pronouns like  we, us, our, and ourselves .

John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote the song, “In My Life” in first person:

There are places I'll remember All my life, though some have changed Some forever, not for better Some have gone and some remain All these places had their moments With lovers and friends, I still can recall Some are dead and some are living In my life, I've loved them all

New Yorker magazine writer and children's book author E.B. White often wrote in the first person, especially in his nonfiction essays. This excerpt is from "Goodbye to Forty-Eighth Street":

One day a couple of weeks ago,  I  sat for a while staring moodily at a plaque that had entered my life largely as a result of some company's zest for promotion.

Choose first person when you want the reader to go along for the ride with you. You direct the action, sure, but the reader  feels  it. Consider these famous first-person plural words:

We the People of the United States in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Preamble of us constitution - first person example

Novels from around 1900 to the present usually show this active, engaged point of view. Tasks ideal for the first person (singular or plural) include:

Autobiographies

Journals or diaries

Reading records

Song lyrics

Letters (formal or friendly)

Places to  avoid  the first person:

Academic work

Instructions

Types of first person

First person narration can take different forms:

Reliable – the writer's character speaks the truth

Unreliable – the writer's character is hiding something; they are an unreliable narrator

First-person central – the narrator is the main character and central to the plot

First-person peripheral – the narrator is a witness, but not the main character

To read a gripping first-person narrative, revisit Suzanne Collins' "Hunger Games" trilogy.

Second person point of view

Second person point of view is known as the “you” perspective. It is the perspective of the person or persons that the narrator is addressing. The second person perspective is identifiable by the author's use of second-person pronouns:  you, yourself, your, yours, or yourselves .

Many second-person pronouns are both singular and plural, depending on the context.

Second person pov

The second person point of view attempts to turn the reader into the character. It is seldom used in novels but does give an immediate jolt.

Second person point of view examples

The use of second-person perspective in novels or stories is rare, but it does exist. Consider this example from fiction, "Earth and Ashes" by Atiq Rahimi and Erdag Goknar:

With your back to the autumn sun, you are squatting against the iron railings of the bridge that links the two banks of the dry riverbed north of Pul-i-Khumri.

Second person helps to deeply immerse new readers in many children's books. The entirety of "How to Babysit a Grandpa" is written as a second-person book of instructions:

As soon as your grandpa says, “I give up,” jump out and shout, “Here I am!”

The second person point of view is perfectly natural for recipes and directions. Here is a way to make lemonade, written in the second person:

You need six lemons, six cups of cold water, and one cup of sugar.

You'll need a large pitcher for mixing everything and a juicer.

Before you juice the lemons, you can make your work easier by rolling the lemons on the counter, hard.

Then you just juice them normally.

You combine the fresh lemon juice, water, and sugar in the pitcher.

Stir; you may want to adjust sweetness or water to taste.

Using second person point of view

With instructions and directions, second person can be an “understood” point of view:

“Turn to page 178 and solve problems 6 through 10.”

The understood but unwritten subject of that sentence is “You”, the pronoun is just left out.

Never use the second person POV in academic writing.

Third person point of view

The third-person point of view belongs to the people or person the narrator is referring to. Third-person pronouns are  she, he, her, him, hers, his, herself, himself, it, its, itself, they, their, theirs,  them and  themselves .

For the writer who must tell several interwoven stories, provide psychological distance between the subject and the reader, or who needs to stay neutral, nothing beats the third-person viewpoint.

All academic writing, most advertising, many novels, and most quotations or aphorisms are written in the third person.

Third person point of view

Third person limited

The third-person limited point of view is when the narrator only has some access to the experiences and thoughts of the characters. Many times, the third person limited perspective limits the narrators access to the thoughts and experiences of just one character.

Third person omniscient

The third-person omniscient point of view is when the narrator has access to all the experiences and thoughts of all the characters in the story. An omniscient narrator knows the main character's thoughts and those of every other character in the novel or short story.

Third person point of view examples

Here is a passage from J.K. Rowling's  Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone , showing the power of third person:

Harry moved in front of the tank and looked intently at the snake. He wouldn't have been surprised if it had died of boredom itself...

In fiction, third person allows a writer to put the reader into the heads of all the characters, explain important plot points, and present information in a seemingly neutral way.

Speaking In Third Person

Speaking in the third person is not typical, but people do it. It can be an excellent  comedic effect or to grab someone's attention.

Here is an example of Larry speaking in the third person:

Sheila : Hey Jake, let's watch this movie! Larry loves this movie.

Jake : Oh yes, Larry is a huge fan of this one. Let's watch it!

Larry : What!? Larry does not like this movie.

Fourth person point of view

The  fourth person point of view  is a term used for indefinite or generic referents. A common example in the English language is the word one as in “one would think that's how it works.” This example sentence is referring to a generic someone.

You may also see the fourth person point of view called the third person generic.

Choosing a point of view

We all like to write in a natural way. As a writer, you have a duty to your reader to think carefully about your point of view. Many writers rewrite their work if the point of view seems awkward.

That paragraph went from first person to second person to third person, all in just three sentences!

Choosing a point of view

The first-person point of view or a first-person narrator can fool a reader into trusting the narrator when the narrator is not a reliable reporter (great for mysteries, recounted tales, and fictional confessionals).

Many great novels such as "The Great Gatsby" are written from a first-person perspective. Another classic in first person POV is Herman Melville's "Moby Dick." It is clear who is narrating with the line "Call me Ishmael."

The second person is suitable for simple, direct storytelling (for children, recipes, assembly instructions, and the like).

A third person narrator creates the most distance between events and the reader. It is almost always seen as a reliable, neutral viewpoint. With the third person, the author can select the point of view of a single character or be omniscient (all-knowing, all present) and move in and out of the minds of all the characters.

Unreliable narrator

IMAGES

  1. Make DIY Homework Writing Machine at Home

    homework machine point of view

  2. How to Make Homework Writing Machine at home

    homework machine point of view

  3. Make DIY Homework Writing Machine at Home

    homework machine point of view

  4. How to make a Homework machine for Students

    homework machine point of view

  5. How To Make Homework Writing Machine at Home

    homework machine point of view

  6. 2018.how to make homework machine for students at home

    homework machine point of view

VIDEO

  1. Auto homework machine😱😱 #vlog #shorts #jaatff

  2. I GET MAGICAL HOMEWORK MACHINE 😱💥|| #mrrupaiyt #shorts #ytshorts

  3. Cast of The Homework Machine on WERS

  4. The Homework Machine Chapter 2 by Dan Gutman audiobook

  5. Student Homework Machine 🤯📝

  6. The Homework Machine Chapter 7-9 by Dan Gutman audiobook

COMMENTS

  1. "The Homework Machine " Summary and Study Guide

    The Homework Machine, written by acclaimed American author Dan Gutman was first published in 2007 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers and is the first of a two-book series.The second book, The Return of the Homework Machine, was published in 2011.Gutman is primarily a children's fiction writer who has been nominated for and won numerous awards, including 18 for The Homework Machine ...

  2. PDF The Homework Machine

    The Homework Machine By Dan Gutman Chapter 1 Before you read the chapter: The protagonist in most novels features the main character or "good guy". There are four very different protagonists in The Homework Machine, all sharing equal billing: Snik, Kelsey, Judy and Brenton. Think back on some of your favorite characters from past novels you

  3. The Homework Machine- Summary & Analysis

    The Homework Machine: Author: Shel Silverstein: Publication Year: 1981: Setting: The speaker's home: Genre: Children's Poetry: Point of view: First person: Tone: Humorous, cautionary: Literary devices: Personification, hyperbole, irony: Symbolism: The homework machine can be seen as a symbol of the dangers of relying on machines to do our ...

  4. The Homework Machine

    The Homework Machine. The Homework Machine, Oh, the Homework Machine, Most perfect contraption that's ever been seen. Just put in your homework, then drop in a dime, Snap on the switch, and in ten seconds' time, Your homework comes out, quick and clean as can be. Here it is— 'nine plus four?' and the answer is 'three.'.

  5. The Homework Machine

    The introduction to The Homework Machine is written from the perspective of Rebecca Fish, the police chief of Grand Canyon, Arizona. Rebecca is thinking back to the closed case of the "homework machine" and the four fifth-grade students involved, musing that the mile-deep canyon seems to attract strange cases like "flies to dog doo" (1).

  6. Project MUSE

    The Homework Machine (review) Gutman, Dan The Homework Machine. Simon, 2006 [160p] ISBN -689-87678-5$15.95 Reviewed from galleys R Gr. 4-6. Fifth-graders nicknamed "Group D" seem to have only one thing in common—their last names. Sam Dawkins, the new kid, is a troublemaker; Kelsey Donnelly wants nothing to do with school; Judy Douglas is an ...

  7. The Homework Machine (The Homework Machine, #1) by Dan Gutman

    Dan Gutman. The unlikely foursome made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker -- Brenton, Sam "Snick,", Judy and Kelsey, respectively, -- are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together ...

  8. THE HOMEWORK MACHINE

    When fifth-graders Judy, Sam and Kelsey discover their classmate Brenton Damagatchi's homework machine, they think they are on to a good thing and begin to visit him regularly after school. Alphabetically seated at the same table, the brilliant Asian-American computer geek, hardworking, high-achieving African-American girl, troubled army brat and ditzy girl with pink hair would seem to have ...

  9. The Homework Machine

    Doing homework becomes a thing of the past! Meet the D Squad, a foursome of fifth graders at the Grand Canyon School made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker. They are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine.

  10. The Homework Machine

    Doing homework becomes a thing of the past! Meet the D Squad, a foursome of fifth graders at the Grand Canyon School made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker. They are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code-named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together, attracting a lot of attention.

  11. The Homework Machine

    Doing homework becomes a thing of the past!Meet the D Squad, a foursome of fifth graders at the Grand Canyon School made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker. They are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code-named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together, attracting a lot of attention.

  12. The Homework Machine

    DOING HOMEWORK BECOMES A THING OF THE PAST The unlikely foursome made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker -- Brenton, Sam "Snick,", Judy and Kelsey, respectively, -- are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together, attracting a lot of ...

  13. The Homework Machine

    The Homework Machine. Paperback - June 26, 2007. by Dan Gutman (Author) 4.6 783 ratings. Book 1 of 2: The Homework Machine. Teachers' pick. See all formats and editions. Doing homework becomes a thing of the past! Meet the D Squad, a foursome of fifth graders at the Grand Canyon School made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a ...

  14. The Homework Machine by Dan Gutman (The Homework Machine, #1)

    The Homework Machine. Written by Dan Gutman. Book # 1 in the The Homework Machine Series. Paperback. $ 7.99. $ 7.59. Add to cart. 8 - 12. Reading age.

  15. PDF th grade The Homework Machine: Theme, The Hidden Message

    trailer for The Homework Machine. Your boss has asked you to create a story board showing the themes of The Homework Machine that can be used as a presentation tool at your staff meeting next week. Remember, the best movies are appealing to people of all ages, so make sure your themes are relatable to all audiences! Good luck and be creative!

  16. The Homework Machine: Novel Study

    View 54,976 other resources for 4th - 7th Grade English Language Arts. This The Homework Machine: Novel Study Study Guide is suitable for 4th - 7th Grade. Do opposites really attract? The D Squad in The Homework Machine includes of a quad of opposites. The group, made up of a teacher's pet, a geek, a class clown, and a slacker, make use of a ...

  17. The Homework Machine

    There's long-haired, rebellious, cool guy Sam Dawkins; fun-loving, unacademic, pink-haired Kelsey Donnelly, African American grind Judy Douglas, and friendless genius Brenton Damagatchi. The whole thing starts because Sam is anti-homework, especially the daily fill in-the-blank worksheets his first-year teacher Miss Rasmussen hands out.

  18. "The Homework Machine " Chapters 9-10 Summary & Analysis

    Chapter 9 Summary: May. Snik, Kelsey, Brenton, and Judy gather at Snik's house to say goodbye to Belch. Snik notices that Brenton looks worried as he works on shutting Belch down. Snik tells Brenton to stop "kidding around," feeling as though they are entering some "weird science-fiction movie" (127). Snik suggests busting Belch with ...

  19. The Homework Machine

    DOING HOMEWORK BECOMES A THING OF THE PAST The unlikely foursome made up of a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker -- Brenton, Sam "Snick," Judy and Kelsey, respectively, -- are bound together by one very big secret: the homework machine. Because the machine, code named Belch, is doing their homework for them, they start spending a lot of time together, attracting a lot of ...

  20. The Homework Machine Series by Dan Gutman

    Book 2. Return of the Homework Machine. by Dan Gutman. 3.96 · 928 Ratings · 91 Reviews · published 2009 · 5 editions. Snik, Brenton, Judy, and Kelsey haven't stayed in …. Want to Read. Rate it: The Homework Machine (The Homework Machine, #1) and Return of the Homework Machine (The Homework Machine, #2)

  21. The Homework Machine

    Four fifth-grade students--a geek, a class clown, a teacher's pet, and a slacker--as well as their teacher and mothers, each relate events surrounding a computer programmed to complete homework assignments.

  22. "The Homework Machine " Chapters 5-6 Summary & Analysis

    The Homework Machine. ... Judy is upset that Snik's dad is being sent to the Middle East, but she is quick to point out that she and Snik are not best friends and says Snik is all "gung-ho GI Joe about it" (78). ... View Collection. 290. Laugh-out-Loud Books. View Collection. 479. Popular Study Guides. View Collection. 380.

  23. Point of View

    Point of view examples. First Person POV (You are experiencing it) - "My heart leaped into my throat as I turned and saw a frightening shadow." Second Person POV (Force you into the story) - "You turn and see a frightening shadow." Third Person POV (Show different points of view) - "The children turned and saw the frightening shadow.