Anna Kiesenhofer: Mathematician, amateur cyclist, Olympic champion

Charting the unusual career path of the Tokyo gold medallist

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games - Olimpiadi Tokyo 2020 - Women's Road Race - Musashinonomori Park - Fuji Internetional Speedway 137 km - 25/07/2021 - Anna Kiesenhofer (Austria) - photo Luca Bettini/BettiniPhoto©2021

As an amateur rider, Anna Kiesenhofer ’s Olympics victory might have been a surprise, but she was not a rider to be underestimated.

In an extraordinary comeback story, the winner of the road race at the Tokyo Olympics left the sport at the end of 2017 when she found herself out of contract. She came into Tokyo without a pro team and left as Olympic Champion. 

The 30-year-old began her cycling career in 2014 after sustaining running injuries that prevented her from continuing her pursuits of triathlon and duathlon. She later joined a Catalan amateur team based near Girona and went on to win the Spanish National Cup overall in 2016.

That same year, Kiesenhofer entered the 2.2 Tour Cycliste Féminin International de l'Ardèche, which she had failed to finish the previous season due to a crash on the third stage. On the third stage of the 2016 edition, which featured a summit finish on Mont Ventoux, Kiesenhofer bridged to a breakaway group which, amongst others, contained the Polish rider Anna Plichta, who would later become her breakaway companion in Tokyo. 

Olympics: Shock gold for Anna Kiesenhofer in women's road race Olympics: Van Vleuten celebrates but mistakes silver for gold Deignan frustrated with 'weird agendas' in Olympic road race

After bridging, Keisenhofer then went on to attack the group at the bottom of Ventoux and won the 94.9km stage by 3:53. Kiesenhofer eventually took second overall in the race. 

The then-26-year-old signed her first professional contract with Lotto Soudal Ladies for the following season. However, after a series of DNFs, she ended her 2017 campaign in April and did not sign a contract for 2018, eventually taking a year off the bike.

In 2019, Kiesenhofer came back to the sport as an amateur rider, winning the Austrian national road race and time trial championships and placing 20th in the World Championship time trial. She has gone on to replicate her time trial win every year since, including 2021. Despite her results, Kiesenhofer was still without a professional contract going into the Olympics.

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Off the bike, the new Olympic Champion has a PhD in mathematics after studying at the Technical University of Vienna as well as at Cambridge University before completing her doctorate in Catalonia in 2016 alongside her racing career. She currently works at the University of Lausanne, combining research with teaching. 

Kiesenhofer’s specialism in time trialling coupled with her mathematics expertise make it all the more fitting that the Austrian won by solo breakaway and after a calculation error from the rest of the peloton. 

Before the race, Kiesenhofer had also been using her studies to prepare for the Games: earlier this month, she Tweeted a graph demonstrating her meticulous heat acclimation process in preparation for the temperatures in Tokyo. 

Kiesenhofer was the very first rider to attack in the Olympic road race, eventually forming a breakaway alongsize Carl Oberholzer (South Africa), Omer Shapira (Israel), Vera Looser (Namibia), and Anna Plichta (Poland) which went on to reach a gap of 11 minutes. After Looser and Oberholzer were dropped, Kiesenhofer attacked her two remaining breakaway companions and time-trialled her way to the finish for over 40km. 

After Shapira and Plichta were caught by the remainder of the peloton the rest of the riders seemed to believe that they were racing amongst themselves for Gold, unaware that Kiesenhofer was still in front. 

However, while it might have been a miscalculation from the rest of the peloton that allowed Kiesenhofer to maintain her lead of more than two minutes, her rivals' mistakes should not detract from the Austrian’s efforts and eventual win.

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Tokyo Olympics: Austrian Math PhD Anna Kiesenhofer Shocks Favourites In Olympics Women's Cycling Road Race

Tokyo olympics: austrian mathematician anna kiesenhofer won the gold medal in women's road race cycling on sunday. kiesenhofer holds a doctorate in applied maths..

Tokyo Olympics: Austrian Math PhD Anna Kiesenhofer Shocks Favourites In Olympics Womens Cycling Road Race

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Maths + Sport: exploring the hidden maths behind the Olympics

Usain Bolt

University's mathematical contribution to the London 2012 education programme

I am proud that partners such as the University of Cambridge's Millennium Mathematics Project are delivering on our vision to use the power of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games to boost participation in education. Lord Coe

By what length would Usain Bolt beat you if you raced him in the 200m? Are the long jump or shot put world records more likely to be broken in some Olympic host cities than others? Does the host nation for the Games have an advantage when it comes to winning medals? How does the geometry of the Velodrome contribute to speed?

Children around the country are exploring the answers to these questions by taking part in an inspiring programme highlighting the hidden maths behind the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The Maths and Sport: Countdown to the Games programme, which has been awarded the Inspire Mark, the badge of the London 2012 Inspire programme, forms part of the education legacy of the London Games.

It has been devised by the University of Cambridge's award-winning Millennium Mathematics Project and features in the Practical Learning strand of Get Set +, the London 2012 education programme.

The free Maths and Sport website hosts a wide range of activities designed to give students in primary and secondary schools the chance to engage with maths in exciting real contexts.

The resources explore how maths plays a part in every aspect of the Games, from the sports themselves to the architecture of the Olympic venues.

For primary school children, activities range from using multiplication and fractions to work out how much performance in the long jump and high jump improves after training, to practical activities using schools’ sports equipment – basketballs, hockey balls, tennis balls - to help learn about the properties of circles and develop mathematical reasoning skills.

Sample activities for secondary students include helping to design a heptathlete’s training schedule, exploring the best ways for coaches and competitors to present sports data through diagrams and graphs, and investigating the mechanics involved in the pole vault.

Older students can work out what the probability is that an athlete who fails a drug test is actually innocent.

Challenges exploring how maths underlies Olympic architecture include designing the tiered seating for a sports stadium and working out the staggered starting positions for the 400m running track, where students put the geometry they learn in the classroom to practical use.

In addition to the classroom activities, the site includes feature articles of general interest about the role of maths in sport. For instance, Professor John Barrow, director of the Millennium Mathematicss Project and himself a former athlete, discusses how the wind can affect timings in races and what athletes can do to counter it.

Other articles look at engineering in Olympic and Paralympic sports equipment, and whether, after Usain Bolt’s amazing 100m performance in Beijing, mathematical models can help predict if there’s an ultimate lowest limit for the 100 metre world record which no human could run fast enough to break.

The resources for Key Stages 1 to 5 include detailed teachers’ notes giving ideas and suggestions for introducing the activities in the classroom.

The online resources are complemented by a Maths and Sport Roadshow, suitable for Key Stages 2, 3 and 4, which is visiting schools all over the UK to run special Maths and Sport events.

The Maths and Sport Roadshow has also recently worked with schools in Ireland and Gibraltar and will run several events in France during March and April in partnership with the British Council.

Professor John Barrow, director of the Millennium Maths Project, said: “The London 2012 Games offer a unique opportunity to harness the excitement about the Olympics to promote a deeper understanding of how maths is at work in the real world.

“The Millennium Mathematics Project is dedicated to inspiring students and teachers: we believe that the role played by maths in sport offers an exciting opportunity to enrich the teaching of mathematics in all schools and shed new light on sporting activity.”

Lord Coe, Chair of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games, commented: “Maths + Sport: Countdown to the Games will encourage young people to fulfil their potential.

“I am proud that partners such as the University of Cambridge's Millennium Mathematics Project are delivering on our vision to use the power of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games to boost participation in education.”

* Maths and Sport: Countdown to the Games is supported by grants from the Nuffield Foundation and the Royal Commission of 1851 and by the award of the Gresham Prize from Gresham College.

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  • ARTS REVIEW
  • 08 June 2020

Stirring biopic of the first woman to win top maths prize

  • Davide Castelvecchi

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Maryam Mirzakhani writing on paper while on the floor

Maryam Mirzakhani made breakthroughs in fields such as dynamics. Credit: The Simons Foundation

Secrets of the Surface Director: George Csicsery Zala Films (2020) http://www.zalafilms.com/secrets

Maryam Mirzakhani broke into the exclusive club of top mathematics prizewinners in 2014. It was a momentous occasion: whether because of committee biases or the gauntlet of systemic obstacles and social pressures, no woman had previously won the discipline’s most coveted award, the Fields Medal, established in 1936. Now, it seemed that the pipeline of female talent was finally beginning to deliver.

George Csicsery’s Secrets of the Surface is the first feature-length film on Mirzakhani. It celebrates how she broke multiple glass ceilings — she was also the first Iranian to win the prize. And it strikes a satisfying balance between her magnificent mathematics and her human story, including her untimely death from cancer in 2017, at the age of 40.

The film traces Mirzakhani’s roots and legacy, interviewing current students and teachers at the school for intellectually gifted girls she attended in Tehran. She did not show a particular interest in maths early on. Instead, she devoured books, dreaming of becoming a writer. But her aptitude for numbers showed: classmates joked that when presented with a problem in a maths lesson, she took pleasure in solving it four different ways.

Inspirational performance

In 1994, Mirzakhani and her best friend, Roya Beheshti — now a mathematician at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri — became the first women in the Iranian delegation to the International Mathematical Olympiad. Mirzakhani returned the next year, and gained a perfect score. Her exceptional performance made her a national celebrity, and inspired other Iranian girls to study mathematics.

Schoolgirls in Tehran at a blackboard working on maths

Iranian girls were inspired to take up mathematics as a result of Maryam Mirzakhani’s success. Credit: George Csicsery

Graduating from Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, she went on to study for a PhD at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (A move that would these days be extremely difficult, given US President Donald Trump’s restrictions on travel to the United States from Iran and other countries.) In her thesis, Mirzakhani solved a central problem about curves on Riemann surfaces, a subject with a 150-year pedigree. To describe this and other achievements, the documentary switches from biographical to educational mode, with elegant animations.

Billiard-ball breakthrough

Soon after her earning her PhD, Mirzakhani became a faculty member at Stanford University in California, where she made several other breakthroughs with various collaborators. In one major result, she and Alex Eskin of the University of Chicago in Illinois studied the chaotic dynamics of billiard balls.

In the film, many collaborators and peers describe a problem solver with the indomitable spirit of a marathon runner. Some fight back tears as they recall working alongside her. Their accounts are greatly enriched by interviews and other footage of Mirzakhani shot for a series of videos on the four winners of the 2014 Fields Medals.

Csicsery has carved a niche as a maker of compelling films about mathematicians, starting with the brilliant 1993 N is a Number , on Paul Erdős, the most productive mathematician of the modern era and a perennial couchsurfer. Csicsery’s latest work celebrates the importance of female role models by showing the impact of Mirzakhani’s short but extraordinary life on today’s young women. But it never directly addresses the big question: why has no other woman ever won a Fields Medal (and only one, Karen Uhlenbeck in 2019, has received the Abel Prize), and what can be done to change this?

Nature 582 , 176-177 (2020)

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-01681-2

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PhD Program

More information and a full list of requirements for the PhD program in Mathematics can be found in the University Bulletin .

During their first year in the program, students typically engage in coursework and seminars which prepare them for the  Qualifying Examinations .  Currently, these two exams test the student’s breadth of knowledge in algebra and real analysis. 

Starting in Autumn 2023, students will choose 2 out of 4 qualifying exam topics: 

  • real analysis
  • geometry and topology
  • applied mathematics

Course Requirements for students starting prior to Autumn 2023

To qualify for candidacy, the student must have successfully completed 27 units of Math graduate courses numbered between 200 and 297.

Within the 27 units, students must satisfactorily complete a course sequence. This can be fulfilled in one of the following ways:

  • Math 215A, B, & C: Algebraic Topology, Differential Topology, and Differential Geometry
  • Math 216A, B, & C: Introduction to Algebraic Geometry
  • Math 230A, B, & C: Theory of Probability
  • 3 quarter course sequence in a single subject approved in advance by the Director of Graduate Studies.

Course Requirements for students starting in Autumn 2023 and later

To qualify for candidacy, the student must have successfully completed 27 units of Math graduate courses numbered between 200 and 297. The course sequence requirement is discontinued for students starting in Autumn 2023 and later.

By the end of Spring Quarter of their second year in the program, students must have a dissertation advisor and apply for Candidacy.

During their third year, students will take their Area Examination , which must be completed by the end of Winter Quarter. This exam assesses the student’s breadth of knowledge in their particular area of research. The Area Examination is also used as an opportunity for the student to present their committee with a summary of research conducted to date as well as a detailed plan for the remaining research.

Years 4&5

Typically during the latter part of the fourth or early part of the fifth year of study, students are expected to finish their dissertation research. At this time, students defend their dissertation as they sit for their University Oral Examination. Following the dissertation defense, students take a short time to make final revisions to their actual papers and submit the dissertation to their reading committee for final approval.

Throughout the PhD Program

All students continue through each year of the program serving some form of Assistantship: Course, Teaching or Research, unless they have funding from outside the department.

Our graduate students are very active as both leaders and participants in seminars and colloquia in their chosen areas of interest.

Ph.D. Program

Degree requirements.

In outline, to earn the PhD in either Mathematics or Applied Mathematics, the candidate must meet the following requirements.

  • Take at least 4 courses, 2 or more of which are graduate courses offered by the Department of Mathematics
  • Pass the six-hour written Preliminary Examination covering calculus, real analysis, complex analysis, linear algebra, and abstract algebra; students must pass the prelim before the start of their second year in the program (within three semesters of starting the program)
  • Pass a three-hour, oral Qualifying Examination emphasizing, but not exclusively restricted to, the area of specialization. The Qualifying Examination must be attempted within two years of entering the program
  • Complete a seminar, giving a talk of at least one-hour duration
  • Write a dissertation embodying the results of original research and acceptable to a properly constituted dissertation committee
  • Meet the University residence requirement of two years or four semesters

Detailed Regulations

The detailed regulations of the Ph.D. program are the following:

Course Requirements

During the first year of the Ph.D. program, the student must enroll in at least 4 courses. At least 2 of these must be graduate courses offered by the Department of Mathematics. Exceptions can be granted by the Vice-Chair for Graduate Studies.

Preliminary Examination

The Preliminary Examination consists of 6 hours (total) of written work given over a two-day period (3 hours/day). Exam questions are given in calculus, real analysis, complex analysis, linear algebra, and abstract algebra. The Preliminary Examination is offered twice a year during the first week of the fall and spring semesters.

Qualifying Examination

To arrange the Qualifying Examination, a student must first settle on an area of concentration, and a prospective Dissertation Advisor (Dissertation Chair), someone who agrees to supervise the dissertation if the examination is passed. With the aid of the prospective advisor, the student forms an examination committee of 4 members.  All committee members can be faculty in the Mathematics Department and the chair must be in the Mathematics Department. The QE chair and Dissertation Chair cannot be the same person; therefore, t he Math member least likely to serve as the dissertation advisor should be selected as chair of the qualifying exam committee . The syllabus of the examination is to be worked out jointly by the committee and the student, but before final approval, it is to be circulated to all faculty members of the appropriate research sections. The Qualifying Examination must cover material falling in at least 3 subject areas and these must be listed on the application to take the examination. Moreover, the material covered must fall within more than one section of the department. Sample syllabi can be reviewed online or in 910 Evans Hall. The student must attempt the Qualifying Examination within twenty-five months of entering the PhD program. If a student does not pass on the first attempt, then, on the recommendation of the student's examining committee, and subject to the approval of the Graduate Division, the student may repeat the examination once. The examining committee must be the same, and the re-examination must be held within thirty months of the student's entrance into the PhD program. For a student to pass the Qualifying Examination, at least one identified member of the subject area group must be willing to accept the candidate as a dissertation student.

Welcome to the Math PhD program at Harvard University and the Harvard Kenneth C. Griffin Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Learn more about Harvard’s Math community and our statement on diversity and inclusion.

The Harvard Griffin GSAS Office of Equity, Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging offers student affinity groups for graduate students and many other resources.

The Harvard University Office for Gender Equity has dedicated GSAS Title IX resource coordinators who work with and support graduate students.

open. The application deadline is December 15, 2021. -->

The application deadline for fall 2024 admission has passed. Applications for fall 2025 admission will open in September 2024.

For information on admissions and financial support, please visit the Harvard Harvard Kenneth C. Griffin Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Harvard Griffin GSAS is committed to ensuring that our application fee does not create a financial obstacle. Applicants can determine eligibility for a fee waiver by completing a series of questions in the Application Fee section of the application. Once these questions have been answered, the application system will provide an immediate response regarding fee waiver eligibility.

maths phd olympics

Ph.D. Program Overview

Description.

The graduate program in the field of mathematics at Cornell leads to the Ph.D. degree, which takes most students five to six years of graduate study to complete. One feature that makes the program at Cornell particularly attractive is the broad range of  interests of the faculty . The department has outstanding groups in the areas of algebra, algebraic geometry,  analysis, applied mathematics, combinatorics, dynamical systems, geometry, logic, Lie groups, number theory, probability, and topology. The field also maintains close ties with distinguished graduate programs in the fields of  applied mathematics ,  computer science ,  operations research , and  statistics .

Core Courses

A normal course load for a beginning graduate student is three courses per term. 

There are no qualifying exams, but the program requires that all students pass four courses to be selected from the six core courses. First-year students are allowed to place out of some (possibly, all) of the core courses. In order to place out of a course, students should contact the faculty member who is teaching the course during the current academic year, and that faculty member will make a decision. The minimum passing grade for the core courses is B-; no grade is assigned for placing out of a core course.

At least two core courses should be taken (or placed out) by the end of the first year. At least four core courses should be taken (or placed out) by the end of the second year (cumulative). These time requirements can be waived for students with health problems or other significant non-academic problems. They can be also waived for students who take time-consuming courses in another area (for example, CS) and who have strong support from a faculty; requests from such students should be made before the beginning of the spring semester. 

The core courses  are distributed among three main areas: analysis, algebra and topology/geometry. A student must pass at least one course from each group. All entering graduate students are encouraged to eventually take all six core courses with the option of an S/U grade for two of them. 

The six core courses are:

MATH 6110, Real Analysis

MATH 6120, Complex Analysis

MATH 6310, Algebra 1

MATH 6320, Algebra 2

MATH 6510, Introductory Algebraic Topology

MATH 6520, Differentiable Manifolds.

Students who are not ready to take some of the core courses may take MATH 4130-4140, Introduction to Analysis, and/or MATH 4330-4340, Introduction to Algebra, which are the honors versions of our core undergraduate courses.

"What is...?" Seminar

The "What Is...?" Seminar is a series of talks given by faculty in the graduate field of Mathematics. Speakers are selected by an organizing committee of graduate students. The goal of the seminar is to aid students in finding advisors.

Schedule for the "What Is...?" seminar

Special Committee

The Cornell Graduate School requires that every student selects a special committee (in particular, a thesis adviser, who is the chair or the committee) by the end of the third semester.

The emphasis in the Graduate School at Cornell is on individualized instruction and training for independent investigation. There are very few formal requirements and each student develops a program in conjunction with his or her special committee, which consists of three faculty members, some of which may be chosen from outside the field of mathematics. 

Entering students are not assigned special committees. Such students may contact any of the members on the Advising Committee if they have questions or need advice.

Current Advising Committee

Analysis / Probability / Dynamical Systems / Logic: Lionel Levine Geometry / Topology / Combinatorics: Kathryn Mann Probability / Statistics:  Philippe Sosoe Applied Mathematics Liaison: Richard Rand

Admission to Candidacy

To be admitted formally to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass the oral admission to candidacy examination or A exam. This must be completed before the beginning of the student's fourth year. Upon passing the A exam, the student will be awarded (at his/her request) an M.S. degree without thesis.

The admission to candidacy examination is given to determine if the student is “ready to begin work on a thesis.” The content and methods of examination are agreed on by the student and his/her special committee before the examination. The student must be prepared to answer questions on the proposed area of research, and to pass the exam, he/she must demonstrate expertise beyond just mastery of basic mathematics covered in the core graduate courses. 

To receive an advanced degree a student must fulfill the residence requirements of the Graduate School. One unit of residence is granted for successful completion of one semester of full-time study, as judged by the chair of the special committee. The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of six residence units. This is not a difficult requirement to satisfy since the program generally takes five to six years to complete. A student who has done graduate work at another institution may petition to transfer residence credit but may not receive more than two such credits.

The candidate must write a thesis that represents creative work and contains original results in that area. The research is carried on independently by the candidate under the supervision of the chairperson of the special committee. By the time of the oral admission to candidacy examination, the candidate should have selected as chairperson of the committee the faculty member who will supervise the research. When the thesis is completed, the student presents his/her results at the thesis defense or B Exam. All doctoral students take a Final Examination (the B Exam, which is the oral defense of the dissertation) upon completion of all requirements for the degree, no earlier than one month before completion of the minimum registration requirement.

Masters Degree in the Minor Field

Ph.D. students in the field of mathematics may earn a Special Master's of Science in Computer Science. Interested students must apply to the Graduate School using a form available for this purpose. To be eligible for this degree, the student must have a member representing the minor field on the special committee and pass the A-exam in the major field. The rules and the specific requirements for each master's program are explained on the referenced page.

Cornell will award at most one master's degree to any student. In particular, a student awarded a master's degree in a minor field will not be eligible for a master's degree in the major field.

Graduate Student Funding

Funding commitments made at the time of admission to the Ph.D. program are typically for a period of five years. Support in the sixth year is available by application, as needed. Support in the seventh year is only available by request from an advisor, and dependent on the availability of teaching lines. Following a policy from the Cornell Graduate School, students who require more than seven years to complete their degree shall not be funded as teaching assistants after the 14th semester.

Special Requests

Students who have special requests should first discuss them with their Ph.D. advisor (or with a field member with whom they work, if they don't have an advisor yet). If the advisor (or field faculty) supports the request, then it should be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies.  

Department of Mathematics

students at chalkboard

  • Prospective Graduate Student FAQ
  • Graduate Board Oral Exam
  • Graduate Courses
  • Qualifying Exams
  • Recent PhD Theses
  • Graduate Awards

The goal of our PhD program is to train graduate students to become research mathematicians. Each year, an average of five students complete their theses and go on to exciting careers in mathematics both inside and outside of academia.

Faculty research interests in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Mathematics are concentrated in several areas of pure mathematics, including analysis and geometric analysis, algebraic geometry and number theory, differential geometry, algebraic topology, category theory, and mathematical physics. The department also has an active group in data science, in collaboration with the Applied Math Department .

The Department values diversity among its members, is committed to building a diverse intellectual community, and strongly encourages applications from all interested parties.

A brief overview of our graduate program is below. For more detailed information, please see the links at the right.

Program Overview

All students admitted to the PhD program receive full tuition fellowships and teaching assistantships. Students making satisfactory progress are guaranteed support for five years. A sixth year is generally possible for students who are on track to complete their Ph.D. and would benefit from the additional year.

PhD candidates take two or three courses per semester over the first several years of the program. These are a mix of required and intermediate-level graduate courses, independent studies, and special topics classes offered by our faculty.

By the beginning of their second year, students are asked to demonstrate competency in algebra and in analysis by passing written qualifying exams in these two broad areas. Students are then expected to choose an advisor, who will supervise their dissertation and also administer an oral qualifying exam to be taken in the second or third year. More specifics about all these requirements are described on the requirements page .

All graduate students are invited to attend weekly research seminars in a variety of topic areas as well as regular department teas and a weekly wine and cheese gathering attended by many junior and senior members of the department. A graduate student lunch seminar series provides an opportunity for our students to practice their presentation skills to a general audience.

PhD students will gain teaching experience as a teaching assistant for undergraduate courses. Most of our students lead two TA sections per week, under the supervision of both the faculty member teaching the course and the director of undergraduate studies. Students wanting more classroom experience (or extra pay) can teach their own sections of summer courses. First-year students are given a reduced TA workload in the spring semester, in preparation for the qualifying exams.

In addition to their stipend, each student is awarded an annual travel allowance to enable them to attend conferences for which limited funding is available or visit researchers at other institutions.

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Doctoral Recipients

This report presents a statistical profile of doctorates awarded by departments in the mathematical and statistical sciences at universities in the United States. Additional information was provided by the individual new doctoral recipients. Reports here are archival versions of reports published in Notices of the AMS . The archival reports incorporate corrections subsequent to publication, and they include tables on which the reports’ graphics and narrative are based.”

COMMENTS

  1. Anna Kiesenhofer is a math genius who just pulled off one of the

    Anna Kiesenhofer crossed the finish line to win the women's cycling road race of the Tokyo Olympics on Sunday. ... England and a PhD in applied mathematics from the Polytechnic University of ...

  2. The Math Ph.D. Who Just Shocked Olympic Cycling

    Who Just Shocked Olympic Cycling. Austria's Anna Kiesenhofer escapes early to fend off a confused Dutch superteam and capture gold. Anna Kiesenhofer of Austria crosses the line to win the gold ...

  3. Anna Kiesenhofer: Mathematician, amateur cyclist, Olympic champion

    Off the bike, the new Olympic Champion has a PhD in mathematics after studying at the Technical University of Vienna as well as at Cambridge University before completing her doctorate in Catalonia ...

  4. The story of Anna Kiesenhofer: From PhD in mathematics to being

    Kiesenhofer is a PhD holder. — Timothy Phillips (@TSJPhillips) Expand Tweet. The newly crowned cycling champion holds a PhD in mathematics. She was a student at the University of Vienna and also ...

  5. The Math Ph.D. Who Just Shocked Olympic Cycling

    Tokyo Olympics 2021: Latest Updates From the Summer Games Full coverage of the Tokyo Games. Last Updated: Sep. 8, 2021 at 8:29 AM EDT. Live Coverage Feed. July 26, 2021 at 7:19 AM. The Math Ph.D ...

  6. Tokyo Olympics: Austrian Math PhD Anna Kiesenhofer Shocks Favourites In

    Tokyo Olympics: Austrian mathematician Anna Kiesenhofer won the gold medal in women's road race cycling on Sunday. Kiesenhofer holds a doctorate in applied maths.

  7. List of International Mathematical Olympiad participants

    The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is an annual international high school mathematics competition focused primarily on pre-collegiate mathematics, and is the oldest of the international science olympiads. The awards for exceptional performance include medals for roughly the top half participants, and honorable mentions for participants who solve at least one problem perfectly.

  8. Maths + Sport: exploring the hidden maths behind the Olympics

    Children around the country are exploring the answers to these questions by taking part in an inspiring programme highlighting the hidden maths behind the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Maths and Sport: Countdown to the Games programme, which has been awarded the Inspire Mark, the badge of the London 2012 Inspire programme, forms part ...

  9. Stirring biopic of the first woman to win top maths prize

    Inspirational performance. In 1994, Mirzakhani and her best friend, Roya Beheshti — now a mathematician at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri — became the first women in the Iranian ...

  10. Guide To Graduate Study

    Guide to Graduate Studies. The PhD Program. The Ph.D. program of the Harvard Department of Mathematics is designed to help motivated students develop their understanding and enjoyment of mathematics. Enjoyment and understanding of the subject, as well as enthusiasm in teaching it, are greater when one is actively thinking about mathematics in ...

  11. PhD Program

    PhD Program. More information and a full list of requirements for the PhD program in Mathematics can be found in the University Bulletin. During their first year in the program, students typically engage in coursework and seminars which prepare them for the Qualifying Examinations . Currently, these two exams test the student's breadth of ...

  12. Ph.D. Program

    In outline, to earn the PhD in either Mathematics or Applied Mathematics, the candidate must meet the following requirements. During the first year of the Ph.D. program: Take at least 4 courses, 2 or more of which are graduate courses offered by the Department of Mathematics. Pass the six-hour written Preliminary Examination covering calculus ...

  13. Admissions

    Harvard Kenneth C. Griffin Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Harvard Griffin GSAS) Mathematics Graduate Studies. Admissions. Financial Support. Graduate Program Administrator. Marjorie Bell (she/her) 617-496-5211. [email protected]. Science Center Room 331.

  14. PDF Some Patterns of PhDs in Mathematics Awarded Annually by Institutions

    of PhDs in mathematics awarded from 2000 to 2019. Figure 1. SED data reporting the number of PhDs in mathematics awarded annually from 2000 to 2019. Over the last 20 years the number of PhDs awarded in mathematics has nearly doubled, from 1050 in 2000 to over 2000 in 2019. During this period, PhDs in mathematics

  15. Harvard Mathematics Department Graduate Information

    Welcome to the Math PhD program at Harvard University and the Harvard Kenneth C. Griffin Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. ... Department of Mathematics Science Center Room 325 1 Oxford Street Cambridge, MA 02138 USA. Tel: (617) 495-2171 Fax: (617) 495-5132. Department Main ...

  16. Department of Mathematics at Columbia University

    website creator . Program of Study. The Department of Mathematics offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The PhD program is an intensive course of study designed for the full-time student planning a career in research and teaching at the university level or in quantitative research and development in industry or government.

  17. Ph.D. Program Overview

    Description. The graduate program in the field of mathematics at Cornell leads to the Ph.D. degree, which takes most students five to six years of graduate study to complete. One feature that makes the program at Cornell particularly attractive is the broad range of interests of the faculty. The department has outstanding groups in the areas of ...

  18. Graduate

    The goal of our PhD program is to train graduate students to become research mathematicians. Each year, an average of five students complete their theses and go on to exciting careers in mathematics both inside and outside of academia.. Faculty research interests in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Mathematics are concentrated in several areas of pure mathematics, including analysis ...

  19. Sixth Annual Stevens Math Olympiad Connects Mathematics to the 'Real

    Mathematics is a powerful tool that helps us understand the world in which we live and solve complex and real problems. It's all around us and in everything we do-and that's never been more clear than at the sixth annual Stevens Math Olympiad. Over 350 registered students attended the 2022 Stevens Mathematical Olympiad on Saturday, May 21.

  20. Graduate Program

    The Department of Mathematics offers a PhD and several Master's degrees. We have about 90 graduate students, and we typically admit 15-20 each year. It is primarily a PhD program, and almost all of our students are supported through Teaching Assistantships. For more information, follow these links: Graduate Admissions; Graduate Student Guide

  21. AMS :: Annual Survey :: PhDs Awarded

    ASA. IMS. MAA. SIAM. Conducted by the American Mathematical Society. This report presents a statistical profile of doctorates awarded by departments in the mathematical and statistical sciences at universities in the United States. Additional information was provided by the individual new doctoral recipients. Reports here are archival versions ...

  22. International Mathematical Olympiad

    The logo of the International Mathematical Olympiad. The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is a mathematical olympiad for pre-university students, and is the oldest of the International Science Olympiads. It is "the most prestigious" mathematical competition in the world. The first IMO was held in Romania in 1959. It has since been held annually, except in 1980.

  23. Does the International Math Olympiad help research mathematics?

    Disclaimer: I participated in the International Math Olympiad, and have a PhD in operations research, which is essentially a type of applied math. There is some overlap between math olympiads and research math. However, as others have noted, mathematics is a very broad field, which includes subfields such as: algebraic topology, theoretical ...