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PERSONAL STATEMENT EXAMPLE Physical Education Personal Statement

Submitted by Ellie

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Physical Education Personal Statement

An active lifestyle has fuelled my passion for Physical Education (PE). Physical activity has played a large part in my life from dancing to competitive swimming I have always enjoyed taking part in sport and the feeling of well-being it brings.

Since starting high school it's been my ambition to become a PE Teacher. I enjoy working with people, encouraging them to participate in physical activity helping to promote a sense of confidence, well-being and achievement. To help achieve my ambition I have sought to learn as much as I can about sports coaching both academically and practically; taking a Higher in PE and taking part in activities to help to build leadership, life and technical skills. I volunteered at my local YMCA from age 13 to 16. As a Youth Worker I ran the gym for young people (aged 12 to 18) providing inductions, demonstrations and developing personal fitness plans. I've run drop-in sessions providing counselling and support helping young people with some of the issues they faced in their day-to-day lives. For my work I was awarded the Saltire Award from John Swinney MSP for 500 hours volunteering. I coach Netball for 1st to 5th Year after school as well a running the Basketball club during lunchtime, whilst this is done in my own time it is very rewarding. I am also an Active Schools Young Sport Ambassador for my school, specialising in Basketball. The Young Ambassadors programme has led to me attaining qualifications in First Aid, Disability Inclusion Training, Young Sports Leaders and Child Protection. I have been trained to handle the day to day situations I may find myself in when I am working in schools as a coach. I have experience in promoting sports and awareness as part of community charity work. I organised a netball match between pupils and teachers for the benefit of St. Andrews Hospice (one of our school charities I am an ambassador for). This was a great event promoting awareness of netball, our school team; whilst raising funds for a very worthwhile cause.

This year I have had the opportunity to take 1st and 2nd Year PE classes each week. This has allowed me to put into action the skills and experiences I have in the environment I want to work in - a high school sports department, planning and delivering lessons. I have also worked with local primary schools as an Active Schools Co-ordinator to organise sports coaching sessions for the pupils. These experiences were quite different and have provided great insight and learning experiences. They have reinforced the passion I have to work with young people. I am a school Prefect taking a lead in school activities, acting as a role model for the other pupils in the school. This role brings a lot of responsibility and allows me to provide and demonstrate leadership in a variety of situations.

Outside of school my hobbies are physical fitness and music - playing both the guitar and bagpipes. I have had the privilege of being part of the North Lanarkshire Schools Pipe Band and playing at the Royal Concert Hall in Glasgow and taking part in the World Pipe Band Championship (achieving a first place for our grade). I also work part-time for Greggs. Working in a fast paced retail environment over the past year has helped me to develop good organisational skills, work with others to achieve goals and develop my customer service skills (I have won several mystery shopper awards for my work).

In conclusion I am confident and hard-working individual. I have worked hard to amass the academic, technical and life skills to achieve my ambition to attend University and get the opportunity to pursue my ambition to teach PE. I believe I have both the attitude and aptitude to thrive in a vibrant university environment.

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Writing a pgce personal statement.

If you’re applying to train as a teacher you’ll be required to write a personal statement as part of your application.

Take your time writing your personal statement. It’s your first chance to make a good impression so it's well worth investing time to develop a clear structure and style of writing.

It’s a good idea to proofread your statement thoroughly and get others to read through and check for typos, grammatical errors, style, and tone.

What's the personal statement for? 

The personal statement is crucial to your PGCE application; it is used primarily to decide whether to invite you for an interview. A poorly written personal statement could end your teaching career before it has started!

This is your chance to demonstrate what you have to offer as a teacher. You should also explain why you want to teach a particular subject or age range, and how your skills and experience will help you become a great teacher. It’s your chance to show your motivation, commitment and teaching potential and an opportunity to show your enthusiasm for teaching a particular subject or age group.

Remember, you only get one opportunity to write a personal statement for both cycles of applications, so it’s important to keep in mind that you should avoid creating tailored personal statements for each university.

How to write and structure your personal statement

The personal statement is split into two sections totalling a maximum of 1,000 words. It’s important to make sure you do not repeat yourself and to take time to ensure that each section is organised coherently. Divide your writing into paragraphs, each dealing with a particular aspect of the question.

Section 1: Why do you want to teach?

(Up to 600 words).

This is the place to talk about why you think you would make a great teacher. You can include:  

  • what has led you to choose teacher training
  • your understanding of the demands and rewards of the PGCE course and of the teaching profession
  • the personal qualities that will make you a valuable asset to a school
  • details of any paid or unpaid experience you have of working with young people and what you learnt
  • details of any other experiences which you can bring to the teaching profession. Think about any ‘transferable skills’ or qualities which you have developed which may be relevant to teaching.
  • If you are a career-changer, what have you been doing and what are your reasons for the switch to teaching?
  • your thoughts on children’s wellbeing and the education system

Your personal statement should tell us why you want to teach, your skills and about any experience you might have of working with young people or in the education sector. If you are taking any exams or additional study before starting the course, particularly if this relates to your eligibility to join the course, we want to hear about it.

It should also show that you understand the education system, what challenges teachers face and that you’re engaged with issues around education.

If you’ve not taught before, think about any other things you’ve done that might demonstrate the skills you’ll need to be a teacher (your transferable skills).

Although it’s a good place to expand on your skills and experience, this shouldn’t be the main focus of your personal statement as the rest of the application will showcase this.

Section 2: Why are you suited to teach your subjects or age group?

Up to 400 words.

Remember to not repeat anything you have already said in section 1!

If you’re writing a personal statement for secondary teacher training, use this section to describe your knowledge and experience of the subjects you’ve chosen. Any work experience in the field will be of interest.

What universities are looking for

Universities want to see your passion for teaching and understand why you think teaching this subject or age group is the right career for you.

Your personal statement should be original and honest. Try and avoid clichés or writing what you think we want to hear. All we really want to hear are the real reasons you’re applying to study a PGCE and become a teacher.

If you’re writing a personal statement for primary teacher training, say why you’d like to teach this age group. If you are particularly interested in certain primary subjects or have relevant experience in them, you can talk about that here too.  

You could talk about:

  • any relevant work or unpaid experience
  • your degree and degree modules
  • your other relevant qualifications, such as A levels
  • any relevant skills, interests or achievements
  • your understanding of the national curriculum

Questions your personal statement should answer

  • Why do you want to be a teacher? 
  • Why do you want to teach a particular subject, Key Stage or age group? 
  • What are your strengths? 
  • What experience do you have and how has this influenced your desire to teach? 
  • What skills do you have that would be useful for teaching

The finer details

Your personal statement should be:

  • no more than 1000 words
  • written in the first-person 
  • grammatically correct - we suggest writing in a document before adding to your application
  • your own work, don’t copy from anywhere online 
  • structured correctly with a clear introduction, evidenced paragraphs and a conclusion 
  • proof-read before being submitted

And finally, be prepared to answer questions about what you’ve written in your personal statement at the interview stage!

Find out more about how to get into teaching .  

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Physical education personal statement example.

Whether watching or participating, Sport can be fun, exciting and at times rewarding. This is a personal view, but it is likely to be a view which is shared by other people of all ages. My enthusiasm for Sport first came to light when I was picked to try out for the County Trials, in Netball. Even though I was unsuccessful, it still didn't prevent me from furthering my performance in Sport.

From an early age, my passion for Sport has continued to grow, and it is these qualities that I wish to channel towards a successful teaching career within Physical Education.

My passion is and has always been to become a fully qualified Secondary School Physical Education teacher and in doing so will channel my energy throughout the course.

Having studied Physical Education as a GCSE option and then studying a Public Service course at College, I have been able to gain a vast amount of knowledge and feel that studying a degree course at University will help provide me with the necessary skills and qualities.

Whilst studying at College, I was awarded the Community Sports Leadership Award (CSLA). Leading up to this award, I completed numerous hours of voluntary work, which involved me taking part in after school clubs within a Secondary School. This provided me with experience and more of an insight into teaching at Secondary level. After completing my College course I was awarded the 'Best Sports Performance' award.

I am very fortunate at the moment, as I am currently assisting Physical Education teachers at a Secondary School during lesson time. This opportunity provides me with a chance to work alongside qualified Physical Education teachers, planning lessons and gaining valuable hands on experience with children at Secondary School level. This has been extremely rewarding for me, as the feedback given from not only the Physical Education teachers but the pupils has been beneficial for my confidence and my encouragement, especially when I can see the pupils enjoying Physical Education.

The majority of my interest is towards Sport, whether it's watching or playing. My favorite Sport is Hockey and I currently train and play for my local Hockey Club. Being a part of this club has been enjoyable, as there are people who are of all ages and abilities which I train alongside. In participating in this Sport, it will hopefully help enable me to widen my skills within this Sport and in time perform to a higher level of those I train with. I have not only participated in Hockey, but I also play: Netball, Football, Athletics, Basketball and Tennis.

I not only play Sports, but I Swim, Walk, and Cycle along with socializing with friends and people of all age groups.

To be given the chance to study for a degree in Physical Education, would allow me to combine skills which I already posses, with the necessary skills and qualities which I will hopefully learn throughout the duration of the course.

I am a determined person who looks forward to getting to know the surroundings and challenges of University life and that of the course which I so strongly desire to be part of. I fully acknowledge the effort and commitment needed for a career such as this, but I strongly believe that I posses the desire and motivation which will help me to excel within this area.

I will be able to share my excitement with the pupils to make Physical Education lessons as enjoyable for them as it was for me.

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PGCE Personal Statement

What to Include in Your PGCE Personal Statement

How your pgce personal statement should be structured, example personal statement, final thoughts, pgce personal statement.

Updated November 24, 2021

Edward Melett

A PGCE personal statement is written as part of the application process for teacher training and gives candidates an opportunity to showcase their skills and attributes.

PGCE candidates will only write one personal statement, which is used to apply for all of their preferred choices. Students upload their personal statement to the UCAS Teacher Training system, and it is submitted for all choices in both phases of the application process (‘Apply 1’ and ‘Apply 2’). No changes can be made once it is submitted.

The personal statement is often used as the deciding factor for choosing whom to invite to interview . This piece of writing should explain the experience you have and how this translates into your abilities in the classroom.

It should also present what you might be like as a teacher – how will your personality and interests help engage students and get them enthused about the subject?

A lot is riding on your personal statement and writing it can be a daunting task. This guide will outline what your PGCE personal statement should contain and how to structure it for the best chance of success.

The admissions team will want to know about the skills, experience and personal qualities you have that would make you perfect for a teaching career. They need to see you have the dedication and passion to complete your PGCE and have a successful future.

Simply saying, “I would be good at this role and am well suited to it” isn’t enough. The PGCE provider needs to read real examples that demonstrate your skills and abilities and meet their requirements.

PGCE Personal Statement

Here are some details you may want to include in your personal statement:

1. About You

A teacher’s personality and personal experience will be highly influential, therefore your own experiences are relevant to your application.

Before you start writing, it’s a good idea to spend a few minutes jotting down some key facts that are relevant to teaching. These might include:

  • Your interests
  • Qualifications/achievements
  • What motivates you
  • Your upbringing
  • Relevant skills

Remember to include examples in your list. Coaching a sports team in your spare time suggests you are experienced in motivating young people and getting the best out of them. Maybe you play an instrument and use music in class. Including qualities like these will make your application stand out.

2. Why You Want to Teach

A key element of your application is explaining why you have chosen teaching as your future career. Show an awareness of how teachers can inspire individuals and also the benefits you might see in yourself.

Try to broaden your answer further than simply saying you are passionate about teaching or children. Every applicant will say they are passionate.

Give details of experiences that moved you towards this career or, perhaps, even the moment you realised this was what you were born to do. By using genuine examples, your passion and excitement will shine through.

3. Why You Are the Best Candidate

Try not to pull out a cliché like “I am passionate, dedicated and reliable” – make your application stand out by using a paragraph that the provider won’t see in any other application that day.

Think about what makes you different from any other candidate. Other applicants may say they can take charge of a class and have experience dealing with challenging children, but will they sing an entire lesson just to get the pupils to engage with them, like you did in your work experience? Or will they bring in a structure made out of Lego to demonstrate osmosis, like you did on your degree placement? Think of what makes you, you.

4. Why a PGCE?

Include details of why you have chosen to go down the route of a PGCE rather than doing a full teaching degree. Perhaps you dipped your toe into teaching while travelling after your degree and realised how much you love it, or maybe you are passionate about biology and wanted to decide at a later date whether to go into teaching or industry.

Show that you have done your research and understand the structure of the PGCE and what will be required.

5. Teaching-Related Experience

Include details of any experience you have gained working in schools or with children in another environment. This might include:

  • Work experience
  • Visits to schools
  • Teaching assistant roles
  • Voluntary teaching/supervision roles (like helping out at a scout hut, etc.)
  • Experience via the Get School Experience service
  • Classroom observations

With every experience you discuss, note the skills you gained and how they will benefit you as a teacher and how they have improved your understanding of the education system.

6. Other Professional Experience

Teaching demands a range of different skills – it’s not simply a case of delivering information.

Talk about past positions you have held:

  • Did you manage people?
  • Did you work within a team?
  • Did you negotiate?
  • Have you trained or coached others?
  • When have you communicated information to different audiences?

The skills you have gained throughout your education, work and personal life can be highly relevant to your application. Be sure to include details of why these skills will make you excel as a teacher.

7. What You Learnt During Your Degree

Whether your degree was in the subject you intend to teach or not, it’s important to talk about the skills you developed throughout your learning and how they will benefit you as a teacher.

If you’re struggling to find transferable skills , here are some ideas:

  • Think about how you communicated (presentations, critiquing the work of your peers, etc.)
  • Give examples of how you organised yourself
  • Describe times you helped others with their learning

Remember to talk about the benefits your initial degree will bring when studying for your PGCE and how your interest in it has inspired your desire to teach.

8. Your Knowledge of What Training to Be/Being a Teacher Entails

It’s important to stress your commitment to your training. To do this, you should demonstrate that you have done your research and are fully aware of what is to come.

Although teaching is a highly rewarding career, no one applying for teacher training will do so without being aware of the challenging nature of the profession.

There is no need to ignore these challenges in your application; actually, it will work in your favour if you show that you have thought about these challenges and are sufficiently prepared.

Talk about the positives and negatives that you expect to experience in your training and within your career, and how your core strengths will help you deal with them.

9. Your Future Plans

Discuss your plans beyond the PGCE:

  • Do you have the ambition to be a headteacher?
  • Do you plan to take on pastoral responsibilities?

Show a keenness to immerse yourself in the school system and be open to opportunities that come your way.

10. Extenuating Circumstances 

Your personal statement is the place to openly discuss any extenuating circumstances, such as low grades or large gaps in employment/education. Make sure you show how you have overcome these challenges and what you learnt from them.

PGCE Personal Statement

Write your personal statement in Word (or equivalent) and make sure you are happy with it before copying and pasting it into your application on the UCAS system.

You need to keep your personal statement to no more than 4,000 characters across a maximum of 47 lines of text . The UCAS Teacher Training system may differ slightly to your word processor, so be prepared to amend slightly once you have copied it into the UCAS page.

To keep to the character limit and cover all the suggested material above, you will need to be succinct. Make sure you only talk about topics that are relevant and delete any waffle.

Your opening statement should be strong and memorable – a good idea is to state why you have decided to get into teaching. Back up all details with examples and be sure to say what you learned from the experience or how you can bring the skills you developed into the classroom.

Split your statement into three sections:

  • Introduction – Introduce yourself and talk about why you want to do a PGCE
  • Middle – Use the notes above to cover the key details
  • Conclusion – Tell the reader why you are the best person for the place they are offering

Avoid using bold, underlining or italics, and write in English (or Welsh if applying for Welsh PGCEs). The UCAS system will strip all special formatting out of the personal statement (except paragraph breaks) so ensure you keep it simple.

When you are happy with the content, make sure you ask someone to check your work . Spelling and grammar in personal statements should be accurate. Make sure you have not copied anyone else’s work at all – UCAS screens all applications for plagiarism.

Below is an example personal statement which covers all of the key points you should include in this piece of writing:

A teacher at my secondary school single-handedly transformed my passion and ability for maths; I was predicted an ‘F’ at GCSE and in a matter of months, she helped me achieve a ‘B’ and start to enjoy the subject. I can’t think of a more satisfying job than one in which you can inspire young people in the way my teacher inspired me. After achieving a ‘B’ in maths at A-Level, I went on to study the subject at University College London and graduated in 2018 with a 2.1. It was in the final year of my degree that I had my first taste of teaching the subject, as several of the modules involved presenting topics to large groups of first-year students. I was thrilled when students asked to see me afterwards to share their observations of what I had been discussing – it was clear my enthusiasm had rubbed off on them and they were excited by maths, which is exactly why I want to teach. I currently work as a teaching assistant at St Andrew’s School, where I have been for six months. This position has given me a great insight into the skills needed to be a fantastic teacher; the school has several SEN pupils and I have been exposed to the more challenging side of the profession. Being trusted to run activities with the entire class has helped me build confidence and learn how important it is to adapt lesson plans to engage students who have different abilities. I have gained valuable skills in implementing strategies such as gentle competitiveness between pupils, and tactical seating plans to get the best out of each student. Before working at St Andrew’s, I completed a work experience placement at Bell Lane Academy where I shadowed teachers working across the five different year groups. This experience helped hone my skills in addressing different age groups in different ways. My ability to get the best out of students is further strengthened by the experience I am currently gaining in the position of assistant coach at my local netball team. Having worked with the girls for the last 18 months, I have developed different ways of motivating individuals, helping push them outside of their comfort zones and encouraging them to take on new challenges. In my spare time, I enjoy playing netball and rugby and would be keen to take on extra responsibilities at a school in the form of after school clubs or teams. I also have a keen interest in management styles and personality types. The knowledge I gain from books on these topics helps me understand pupils and their differing learning styles – what works for them and what doesn’t. It also helps me look inwardly, analysing my own leadership style and methods of teaching. I have chosen to do a PGCE because I am passionate about maths, and I wanted to spend three years of a degree course exploring the subject further, rather than embarking on teacher training straight from school. My degree course has helped me with my confidence and my ability to speak in front of large groups of people. Teaching first-year students during my degree course helped me think about how to deliver the subject in an exciting and creative way. The experience I have had so far has clearly shown that teaching is an extremely challenging profession, but one which I believe is undeniably my calling in life. I adore maths and I want to bring the subject alive, helping children learn in an exciting, rewarding environment. A few weeks ago, I took it upon myself to ask the headteacher for permission to get the whole year group involved in a human percentages exercise – the children loved it. I believe I should be offered a place on your PGCE programme because I can commit to dedicating myself to a role in which I will strive to inspire and excite every pupil I teach.

The personal statement is your one opportunity to capture the attention of the PGCE provider and set yourself apart from other candidates. Teaching is about bringing your personality into the classroom and inspiring students, so avoid a formulaic application and speak from the heart, giving a full picture of who you are.

Your answers should convey enthusiasm for inspiring young people, a passion for teaching, creativity, excellent organisational skills and energy.

Demonstrate an awareness of this challenging profession but conclude with excitement and enthusiasm for your chosen career path.

You might also be interested in these other Wikijob articles:

PGCE Interview Questions

Or explore the Postgraduate / Further Study sections.

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How to write a PGCE personal statement

29 th September 2021

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Advice on how to write a PGCE personal statement that shows you’d make a great addition to a teacher training course.

What is a teacher training personal statement?

What to write, pgce personal statement tips.

When applying for a PGCE or postgraduate teacher training, you’ll probably have to write a personal statement. This is your chance to say why you’d make a great teacher by highlighting your relevant experiences and passion for teaching.

If you’re applying directly to a university or school, you should tailor your statement precisely to the course you’re applying for.

If you’re applying through UCAS Teacher Training, you can send your application to more than one university. Therefore, your statement should be more generic so that it applies to each one you’re applying to.

In both cases, make sure that your personal statement reflects the nature of the course or courses you’re applying for. Think about, for example, is it school- or university-based training? What age of students will you be teaching? Will you be specialising in a particular subject?

Before you start writing, look at any information you can find about the course and what you must do to apply. Has the university provided any guidance or topics of what you need to cover?

If not, can you speak to one of the course tutors to discuss what they might want to see in your statement? Or can you talk to a current PGCE student and ask what they wrote in theirs?

When you have a good idea of what admissions tutors will be looking for, create a mind map or list:

  • Your relevant academic and practical experiences
  • Areas of the course that you’re most interested in
  • Anything else the university wants you to include

When structuring your statement, you can use your mind map or list to plan what information to put where.

Your structure can look something like:

  • Introduction – about yourself and why you want to do the PGCE
  • Middle paragraphs – relevant information of your academic achievements and experiences of working within education
  • Concluding paragraph – tying up the main points of why you’re the best candidate for the course

If you’re applying directly to the university, check what the word limit for your personal statement is.

If you’re submitting to UCAS Teacher Training, your personal statement can be up to 47 lines of text or 4,000 characters.

Expanding on your mind map or list from before, think in more depth about why you want to teach.

  • What qualities do you have that would make you good at teaching?
  • What do you think are the challenges and benefits of being a teacher?
  • Why have you chosen this particular age group and/or subject?
  • What have you learned from your previous experiences in education?
  • Will you be completing any extra exams or relevant experiences before the course starts?

If you studied education at undergraduate level, your course was probably focused on the theoretical side of the subject. Your PGCE course, however, will be about applying those theories to real-life situations in schools. Your personal statement should reflect your understanding of this.

If you haven’t taught before, what other activities or events in your life suggest that you would make a good teacher? Have you worked with children in different environments?

Admissions tutors don’t just want to see why you think your experiences make you a good teacher. Instead, they want to know that you’re aware of the importance of teaching and the demands that come with it.

  • Why is it important to reflect on your abilities as a teaching practitioner?
  • How will you work on your own development to become a great teacher?
  • What interests you about the education system and its challenges?
  • Do you have any thoughts are on child welfare and social justice?

When writing, make sure to use evidence and examples to back up your points. Through your tone of voice, try to show that you are positive and passionate about the work.

To see more information on how to style your personal statement, see our postgraduate statements guide.

  • Ask someone you know to check it through. Even better if you can get feedback from a teacher
  • See if you can speak to other students applying for a PGCE to share thoughts and ideas of what to write
  • Similarly, reach out to PGCE staff at your university – or a teacher you know – they have experience that might be valuable to you!
  • Any time you can spend in a school will be a valuable addition to your application. If you haven’t already, see if you can arrange to volunteer with one locally
  • If you’re invited to an interview, you’ll be asked about what you’ve written on your statement, so be prepared to talk about it in more detail

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Writing a personal statement for a PGCE

personal statement pgce pe

How To Write a PGCE Personal Statement

Your personal statement is crucial to the success of your application and must be well written, concise, well-structured. It must also clearly demonstrate your reasons for choosing teaching and your commitment and suitability for this career in only 47 lines!

Before applying, do your research. Find out what being a teacher is really like. Get experience in a school, talk to teachers and read careers information.

General Tips:

  • Compose your statement in Word and cut and paste it into your online application. This will allow you to ensure it fits, that you have used spell check and have proofread it to ensure its word perfect. Personal statements with a poor level of written English will be rejected.
  • Use Verdana 12 as this is the size and font used by UCAS.
  • Ensure it has a good structure with an introduction, a middle and a conclusion.
  • Get someone to check your final draft who is knowledgeable in this area and whose judgement you trust.
  • Research the Training Provider you are applying for. Which skills/experience/qualifications do they expect?

Your Personal Statement should:

  • be persuasive
  • be fluent, realistic, relevant and specific
  • mention young people- it is about enabling them to learn rather than why you want to teach
  • overuse of short sentences all beginning with ‘I’
  • general statements and narrative
  • I feel/think/believe – instead, use positive action words e.g. planned/managed/implemented/organised
  • making a statement without having evidence to back it up

Sections in your Personal Statement:

  • Introduction- why teaching and why you?
  • The relevance of your work experience
  • What subject you want to teach and why?
  • Additional factors
  • Concluding paragraph

1.Introduction

Why teaching?

  • What is your motivation? What has influenced your decision to teach? Avoid ‘I have always wanted to teach’ or ‘I believe teaching is worthwhile’ or ‘I like children’.
  • Concentrate on what influenced your decision to teach, how the idea has developed and what can you offer in terms of personal skills and attributes.
  • Have certain people influenced you? Why? How?
  • Show your desire to work with young people and refer to evidence.

Make a list of skills and qualities that you have that can be linked to all the key skills that make an effective teacher and how you can demonstrate this with examples:

  • Organisation
  • Communication
  • Energy & enthusiasm
  • Responsibility
  • Love of subject
  • Team player

2.Relevant Experience

School-based experience:

  • Where? Try to avoid visiting the school you attended as a pupil
  • How long for? One day is probably not enough time to see what it means to be a teacher, you need enough time to gain a good understanding of teaching and schools.
  • What did you do? Did you observe lessons, work as a TA, attend meetings/training/ research curriculum/teaching and learning/had a focus on EAL or SEND pupils?
  • What Key Stages did you experience? Make sure it is relevant to the specific PGCE course you are applying for.
  • What techniques did you observe? Effective and not effective and why?
  • Lesson-planning
  • Classroom organisation
  • Classroom management
  • Inclusion/ diversity issues e.g. English as an additional language (EAL); special educational needs (SEND); disadvantaged pupils and gifted and talented pupils.

Always say what you have done and how it demonstrates the skills required as a teacher. For example, ‘reading with a group of pupils showed me that…’ or ‘working with a low ability group allowed me to…’

Other work with young people (paid/unpaid): 

  • Youth groups
  • After school groups
  • Summer camps

What if you don’t have any relevant experience?

Highlight the other experiences you have engaged in and use these to demonstrate your understanding of teaching and schools.

3. What subject you want to teach and why?

  • For Secondary, you need to show that you are passionate about your subject area and passing on that enthusiasm to young people.
  • Link to relevant work experience, what have you observed and match your skills to this.
  • Refer to any research you have done regarding your subject and also the curriculum/ examinations you would be required to teach at that Key Stage
  • Link your qualifications and wider reading to your subject knowledge, if your qualifications are not relevant you need to show how you are going to develop your subject knowledge in order to teach the subject.
  • State why you have applied to this particular type of PGCE course e.g. school-based/ flexibility/ reputation.

4. Additional Factors

  • Hobbies linked to the profession/ skill set e.g. value-added skills such as sport, music, language etc.
  • Additional courses you have completed/ completing e.g. ICT, subject knowledge enhancement course etc.
  • Further experiences planned for the future prior to commencing a PGCE course.

5. Concluding Paragraph

  • State your commitment to the course, acknowledge that teaching requires dedication, stamina, time management, being pro-active
  • Reinforce your reasons for being committed to teaching
  • Demonstrate awareness of the physical and mental demands of the course and the profession
  • Career plan – what is your goal for your teaching career?

A teacher’s must-have qualities:

  • Interpersonal skills
  • Ability to think of their feet
  • Good time-management

Background Reading

www.ucas.com/ucas/teacher-training 

Times Educational Supplement ( www.tes.com )

www.theguardian.com/education

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Writing a Postgraduate Teacher Education personal statement

Updated on 7 July 2023

Guidance on how to write a PGDE/CE personal statement and an example to help demonstrate your skills, experience and motivation for teaching.

A personal statement is a short piece of writing (47 lines/4000 characters) which you are asked to submit in support of your application to study a PGDE/CE made through UCAS. It is your opportunity to demonstrate your skills, experience and motivation for teaching.

Before you start

Remember that this is a very important part of your application. Take your time to carefully plan out and practise your statement. It is a good idea to draft your statement in a word document and get some feedback on it before committing to the final version..

  • Don't waste space with irrelevant or repetitive information. Be succinct and avoid complicated language and overly long sentences.
  • Be specific about what you have to offer. Detail what you have gained from your experiences in schools/working with children. Give appropriate evidence of the skills you possess for teaching.
  • Indicate the relevance of other types of experience or skills you possess, e.g. supervising people or sports
  • Avoid using negative language. Present any gaps in skills or experience positively.
  • Finish with a summary of what you have to offer     leave the selectors with a clear understanding of your suitability for the course.
  • Let your enthusiasm for teaching and working with children shine through in everything you say.
  • Check grammar and spelling thoroughly! Do not rely on the spelling and grammar check on your word processing package alone. Ask someone to proof read it for you.
  • If you are cutting and pasting from a word document, remember to check the formatting.

Questions to consider when structuring your Personal Statement

  • Why do you want to be a teacher? - What has inspired you; who/what influenced you?
  • Why do you want to work with young people? - What appeals to you about working with this age group; what skills do you possess that will help you?
  • Why do you want to teach your subject? For primary: demonstrate a breadth of knowledge across a range of curriculum areas. For secondary, show how your subject knowledge is relevant to the curriculum.
  • What have you gained from working with young people? - Have you had any experience in schools or working with children in other settings? Reflect upon what you did, what you observed, what you learned.
  • What else can you offer? Skills in sports, music, languages, arts and crafts, ICT etc.

This is an example personal statement. There is considerable room for improvement and the notes make suggestions to help you with writing yours.

I am applying for the PGDE course because I have always wanted to be a teacher. I really like working with children and think that I have the right kinds of skills to become a good teacher .

  • The above statement is far too short: you are allowed 47 lines/4000 characters so use them.
  • Remember to specify whether you are applying f or primary or secondary courses.
  • It is not enough to say that you have developed the "right kinds of skills". Be specific about them.
  • It is important to have a strong opening statement . It is the first thing the selectors will read so you want to make an impact. 
  • Think about why you have always wanted to teach and clearly demonstrate.

New Paragraph

At school, I was involved with the Primary 1 class when I was in final year. I helped the less able children with reading on a one to one basis. I also help out at my local Brownie pack every week, keeping the girls busy with various activities. I have applied to do the Student Tutoring Scheme.

  • When describing experience with children, make sure you are specific about what you learned from the work and the skills you developed.
  • You need to demonstrate (by providing evidence) that you have developed/ have the potential to develop skills such as communication, leadership, teamwork, problem solving, organisation, planning and time management.

At school I studied a wide range of subjects but the one I enjoyed most was History so that is what I have studied at university. I also took Psychology and Politics in first year and Politics in second year too.

  • When describing your studies, remember to show how this is relevant to the subject(s) you will be teaching.

I have been a babysitter for two children for several years and enjoy helping the older child with his homework now that he is at school.

  • When describing your experience remember to demonstrate the transferable skills you have gained in this role that would be relevant to teaching. For example with babysitting you could link to the skill of 'behaviour management'.

I am very interested in education generally and keep up to date with current issues by reading the BBC website.

It is not enough to say that you 'keep up-to-date' here. Give a summary of what you have to offer and stating why you should be offered a place on the course.

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Sport Science or PE Personal Statement Example

Sports and physical activities generally are a major part of my life, and experience of various types of sport-based work has helped me to realise that this is the field where I should like to make my career. I enjoy both the practical and the theoretical aspects of the subject and believe that I have something of a natural talent for coaching and for devising new activities which will stimulate other people’s interest in sport and their belief in its importance for human well-being, health and stability. At the same time I am very aware of the commercial value of sport as one of the most popular leisure activities globally, and understand well how this requires careful management, planning and directing. The Olympics are a great opportunity for Britain, but it is important that the impetus of 2012 should be maintained after the games are over, and there are major questions about how much the wider population will benefit from the events, what use the facilities will have after 2012 and how sports providers will deal with the inevitable rise in interest in various sports. Marketing of sport is another interesting issue, as are the regional provision of facilities and the ways publicity can help individual and national sporting success. Funding, in my mind, is perhaps the most complex issue of all. It was clear to me, for example, how the UK cyclists achieved such success in the last Olympic Games through a more carefully considered funding policy which allowed for top level training and preparation. Another aspect that interests me is the relationship between “lite” sports and people’s own experience of sporting activity. Are the financial rewards for top sportsmen compatible with the need to get everybody moving and exercising? Is children’s sport of less “value” than the top sporting events we see on television? Should sport be seen as an essential part of the health service? All of these questions have played their part in my own decision to spend my working life in sports development and coaching

I have taken a BTEC level 3 Extended Diploma in Sports Performance, Coaching and Fitness, which has hugely increased my interest in the subject and made me realise how complex and wide-ranging it is. Coaching particularly interests me because I enjoy meeting new people and working with them, finding ways to explain things to them and helping them realise their own potential. My aim ultimately is to work as a coach and to teach others about sports studies, probably as a PE teacher. A degree course would equip me with valuable information about the psychology of coaching and techniques of teaching. I have undertaken work experience in construction, which gave me good training in administrative processes as well as convincing me that I wanted to work in an industry which is practical and physical. It also trained me in the importance of teamwork and cooperation – key qualities in the sports industry. One of my major strengths is my ability to work alongside others in a team, although I am equally happy working individually and using my own initiative. I have also worked for my parents in our family business, which has given me experience of responding to customers and dealing with money.

I appreciate all sports, but my particular favourites are football and skiing, as well as exercising at the gym. I am always keen to keep as fit as possible, believing strongly in the contribution physical fitness makes to health and to mental well-being. I also enjoy music. I am hard-working and conscientious and a disciplined learner, always paying close attention to instructions and performing allotted tasks as well as I possibly can. My attitude to everything I do is positive, I am reliable and believe that I would be an asset in any team. My colleagues find me adaptable and friendly and I get on well with most people, which is one of the reasons I find coaching so congenial. I have total commitment to my goal to become a professional coach and I believe that I have the qualities to make a complete success of the degree course.

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Physical Education Personal Statement Examples

  • 1 Personal Statement Example Links
  • 2 Career Opportunities
  • 3 UK Admission Requirements
  • 4 UK Earnings Potential For PE
  • 5 Similar Courses in UK
  • 6 UK Curriculum
  • 7 Alumni Network

Personal Statement Example Links

  • Personal Statement Example 1
  • Personal Statement Example 2
  • Personal Statement Example 3

Passionate about sport and keen on promoting health and fitness? Inspired to cultivate these values within the next generation?

With a course in Physical Education, you could lead the charge in shaping active, healthy lifestyles.

Physical Education (PE) degrees offer an exciting opportunity to delve into the scientific, psychological, and sociological aspects of sports and physical activities. This degree is designed for those who have a passion for sports, fitness, and health, and wish to inspire others to engage in physical activities. It is a multidisciplinary field that combines knowledge from areas such as physiology, psychology, sociology, and pedagogy, to understand the role of physical activity in the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities.

In the UK, a PE degree typically takes three years of full-time study for a Bachelor’s degree (BSc or BA), and one or two years for a Master’s degree (MSc or MA). The curriculum usually includes modules on sports science, coaching and leadership, physical activity and health, sports psychology, and sports sociology. Many programmes also offer work placements, providing students with practical experience in schools, sports clubs, or health organisations.

In addition, a PE degree can also serve as a stepping stone to further study and professional qualifications in areas such as physiotherapy, sports psychology, or sports nutrition.

Overall, pursuing this degree offers a comprehensive understanding of the importance of physical activity, equipping students with the knowledge and skills to promote physical health and wellbeing in a variety of settings. Whether you’re passionate about teaching, coaching, health promotion, or research, a PE degree can open the door to a fulfilling career in the sports and health sectors.

👍 When writing a personal statement : Highlight your passion for the course, demonstrating your understanding of it. Use relevant personal experiences, coursework, or work history to showcase how these have fostered your interest and readiness for the course.

Career Opportunities

A degree in physical education can open up a variety of career opportunities. Physical education professionals can work in a variety of settings, including schools, fitness centers, and sports organisations.

1. Physical Education Teacher: Physical education teachers are responsible for designing and delivering physical education programs in schools. They plan activities, provide instruction, and assess student progress.

2. Athletic Trainer: Athletic trainers work with athletes to prevent and treat injuries. They provide first aid, assess injuries, and develop rehabilitation plans.

3. Fitness Instructor: Fitness instructors lead group exercise classes and provide one-on-one instruction. They create exercise plans, demonstrate proper form, and motivate participants.

4. Sports Coach: Sports coaches provide instruction and guidance to athletes. They develop strategies, assess performance, and motivate athletes to reach their full potential.

5. Recreation Coordinator: Recreation coordinators plan and organise recreational activities. They develop programs, coordinate events, and supervise staff.

6. Sports Administrator: Sports administrators manage sports organisations. They develop budgets, oversee operations, and coordinate events.

7. Sports Psychologist: Sports psychologists work with athletes to improve their mental and emotional wellbeing. They provide counseling, develop strategies, and help athletes manage stress.

8. Sports Nutritionist: Sports nutritionists work with athletes to improve their dietary habits. They provide advice on nutrition, create meal plans, and develop nutrition programs.

UK Admission Requirements

In order to be accepted into a university course in physical education, applicants must have achieved a minimum of Grade C in GCSE Physical Education. In addition, applicants must have achieved a minimum of Grade C in GCSE English Language or Literature and a minimum of Grade C in GCSE Mathematics.

These entry criteria are similar to those for other university courses, however, physical education courses may also require applicants to have achieved a minimum of Grade C in GCSE Science. This is to ensure that applicants have the necessary scientific knowledge to understand the physical education course content.

Applicants may also need to demonstrate a commitment to physical activity and sport, either through participation in a sport or through volunteering in a sporting environment. This is to ensure that applicants have a good understanding of the practical elements of physical education.

Finally, applicants may need to pass an interview or a written assessment in order to be accepted into the course. This is to ensure that applicants are passionate about physical education and have the necessary skills to succeed on the course.

UK Earnings Potential For PE

The average earnings for someone with a degree in physical education will depend on the level of the degree, the type of job they pursue, and the location of their job. Generally, physical education teachers earn an average salary of £24,000 to £32,000 per year. Those with more experience or higher qualifications can earn up to £50,000 per year.

In terms of trends in the job market, there is a growing demand for physical education teachers in the UK, with the number of job openings increasing by 6% in 2020. This is due to the increasing focus on health and fitness, as well as the need for more physical education teachers in schools. Additionally, there is a growing demand for physical education professionals in the corporate sector, as more companies are looking to provide employees with health and fitness options.

Similar Courses in UK

Other university courses related to Physical Education are Sports Science, Exercise Science, and Sports Coaching.

Sports Science is a multidisciplinary field that looks at the science behind sport and physical activity. It focuses on the physical, psychological, and social aspects of sport and exercise, and how they can be applied to improve performance.

Exercise Science is a field that focuses on the physiological and biomechanical aspects of physical activity. It looks at how the body responds to exercise, and how to design exercise programs that are tailored to an individual’s needs.

Sports Coaching is a field that focuses on the teaching and development of sport skills. It looks at how to motivate and engage athletes, and how to create a successful team environment.

The key differences between these courses and Physical Education are that Physical Education focuses on the overall development of physical and mental health, while the other courses focus on specific aspects of sport and exercise.

Physical Education looks at the development of the whole person, while the other courses focus on specific aspects of sport and exercise. Physical Education also looks at how to teach physical activities, while the other courses focus on the scientific and coaching aspects of sport and exercise.

UK Curriculum

The key topics and modules covered in a physical education course in the UK curriculum typically include:

  • Anatomy and Physiology: This module covers the structure and function of the human body, including the skeletal, muscular, and cardiovascular systems.
  • Exercise Physiology: This module looks at the body’s response to physical activity and exercise, as well as the effects of exercise on health and performance.
  • Sports Science: This module covers the scientific principles underpinning physical activity and exercise, including biomechanics, nutrition, and psychology.
  • Sports Psychology: This module explores the psychological aspects of sports performance, such as motivation, goal setting, and mental toughness.
  • Sports Coaching: This module looks at the principles of effective coaching and how to develop and implement successful training programmes.
  • Sports Injury and Rehabilitation: This module covers the prevention and management of sports injuries, as well as rehabilitation techniques.
  • Outdoor Adventure Activities: This module looks at the principles of outdoor adventure activities, such as rock climbing, mountain biking, and kayaking.
  • Physical Activity Leadership: This module covers the principles of leading physical activity sessions, such as planning, risk assessment, and delivering effective instruction.

Hands-on experience and practical work is an important part of physical education courses. Students typically participate in physical activities and sports, as well as practical sessions such as anatomy and physiology labs.

Alumni Network

Notable alumni from the course of physical education include Olympic gold medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee and professional basketball player Michael Jordan. Joyner-Kersee is a six-time Olympic medalist who has set world records in track and field events.

She has also founded the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation, which helps to provide educational and athletic opportunities to youth in her hometown of East St. Louis, Illinois. Jordan is a six-time NBA champion and one of the most recognizable basketball players in the world. He is also the owner of the Charlotte Hornets and a major contributor to numerous charities.

Alumni events and networking opportunities available for physical education alumni include the annual Physical Education Alumni Reunion held at the university, which provides alumni with the chance to reconnect with former classmates and faculty, as well as to learn about the latest developments in the field.

Additionally, alumni can join the Physical Education Alumni Network, which offers a variety of resources for alumni to stay connected and engaged with the university and the physical education community.

Reach out to us for career and sponsorship opportunities

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Secondary Physical Education with QTS - PGCE

Currently viewing course to start in 2024/25 Entry .

This course will enable you to use your degree level skills in the teaching of Physical Education (PE) so that you can promote physical activities and a healthy lifestyle in a positive and enjoyable way for all pupils....

  • Level Postgraduate Taught
  • Study mode Full Time
  • Location City Centre
  • Start date September 2024
  • School School of Education and Social Work
  • Faculty Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences

This course is:

Open to International Students

This course will enable you to use your degree level skills in the teaching of Physical Education (PE) so that you can promote physical activities and a healthy lifestyle in a positive and enjoyable way for all pupils.

We believe that PE is a crucial element in the education of all pupils, and will work with you to enable you to become the inspirational secondary school teacher that today’s young people deserve.

What's covered in this course?

Our course provides you with the knowledge and understanding that will enable your current creative skills to grow into exciting and engaging teaching for the classroom. The course is a practice-based programme that will fully support you into becoming a confident, dynamic and creative teacher committed to making PE accessible for all.

Central to the curriculum is the study of PE pedagogy and professional practice, which you will access through a synthesis of practical workshops, lectures, seminar groups and individual study.

Curriculum workshops are a key element of your course. Dedicated PE lecturers and teachers deliver these in our specialist education classrooms and lecture theatres. The workshops enable you to experience and develop your understanding of subject pedagogy through topics such as: Physical literacy, growth mindset through PE, dance in the curriculum, gymnastics, invasion games, net and wall games, target games and athletics, health and safety, as well as Key Stage 3 National Curriculum topics, GCSE and A Level PE topics.

At least two thirds of the course takes place within school. You will be placed in a minimum of two PE departments.

Taught modules, assignments and School-Based Training are structured around the development of your Progress Journal which demonstrates your progress against our ITE Core Curriculum. Our ambitious curriculum incorporates the ITT Core Content Framework (DfE, 2019) and the nationally agreed competences - the Teachers’ Standards,  which all teachers must meet throughout their career. 

The Progress Journal also maps your development as a subject specialist with reference to identified subject priorities appropriate to the needs of secondary teachers entering the profession. A system of continuous review and assessment of progress within the Progress Journal will support your growing ability to take responsibility for your own professional development and ensure that you approach QTS with a sound understanding of research-informed pedagogies and practices. 

Why Choose Us?

  • We are a key source of new teachers to schools across the West Midlands region; a destinations survey of our 2021/22 Secondary Teaching graduates showed they were employed in nearly 100 West Midlands schools as Early Career Teachers.
  • Our curriculum is designed by research-active subject experts to be integrated between university and school-based training with input from our partnership schools, ensuring you’re equipped to meet the needs of the teaching workforce now and in the future.
  • We have partnerships right across the West Midlands and beyond so you can benefit from training in a range of schools and early years settings, preparing you for work in a wide variety of schools when you qualify. A destinations survey of our 2021/22 Secondary Teaching graduates showed that 76% of their employing schools were from within our BCU partnership.
  • You will complete at least 120 days across a minimum of two placements, in line with Department for Education (DfE) requirements, supported by a subject mentor in your school and a personal development tutor at the University.
  • Should you wish to take your development further, you'll gain Master's level credits gained as part of this course that you can then use towards a full Master's degree.
  • We meet the Department for Education's (DfE) Criteria for Initial Teacher Training and successful candidates on our Initial Teacher Training courses will be recommended to the DfE for Qualified Teacher Status.

Join us for an on-campus Open Day where you'll be able to learn about this course in detail, chat to students and explore our campus.

Next Event: 29 June 2024

Entry Requirements

Essential requirements, uk students, selection interview, international qualifications.

If you have a qualification that is not listed, please contact us .

Fees & How to Apply

  • International Student

Annual and modular tuition fees shown are applicable to the first year of study. The University reserves the right to increase fees for subsequent years of study in line with increases in inflation (capped at 5%) or to reflect changes in Government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament. View fees for continuing students .

Award: PGCE

Starting: Sep 2024

International students

personal statement pgce pe

The way you apply for teacher training has changed. The Department for Education (DfE) has developed a GOV.UK application service for postgraduate teacher training called  ‘ Apply for teacher training ’ which you now have to use to make an application.

Course code: 3CJN

We would like all applicants to make a fully informed decision about joining the teaching profession. As part of that decision making process, spending sometime in a school and considering the role of the teacher will prove to be invaluable.

Personal statement

You’ll need to submit a personal statement as part of your application for this course. This will need to highlight your passion for postgraduate study – and your chosen course – as well as your personal skills and experience, academic success, and any other factors that will support your application for further study.

Not sure what to include? We’re here to help – take a look at our top tips for writing personal statements and download our free postgraduate personal statement guide for further advice and examples from real students.

Course in Depth

In order to complete this course a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 60 credits):

Secondary Professional Studies 20 credits

This module, Professional Studies, provides opportunities for you as a trainee teacher to explore and understand in practical terms the meaning of professionalism in the context of education and being a teacher. It is well known that education is an ever-changing environment and the desire for improvement is strong from all stakeholders. This module helps you to understand that the best teachers are those who continue to learn themselves and that your continual development can positively impact the learning experience of your students.

Secondary Subject Pedagogy: PE 20 credits

This module, Subject Pedagogy, provides opportunities for you as a trainee teacher to explore the nature of your specialist subject in the context of learning and teaching in the secondary school. The module provides substantial support for your professional practice in school, assessed through the School Experience modules. This module provides a strong philosophical underpinning to your awareness of the importance of your specialist subject in the secondary school curriculum. By undertaking this module you will be shaping your own rationale for your approach to the teaching of your specialist subject, and to meeting the needs of the learners as they move through the secondary school phase.

Professional Enquiry 20 credits

This module, Professional Enquiry, forms an introduction to active examination of professional practice in the workplace and a reflective approach to personal development. It provides a foundation for future study modules and enables you to develop practice-based enquiry skills. Increasing importance is placed on evidence-based enquiry to inform professional development in education, most recently in The Carter Review of Initial Teacher Training (ITT).

School Experience 1 0 credits

This module, School Experience 1, provides opportunities for you as a trainee teacher to meet the professional standards and expectations of teaching through practical, school-based experience. You will have the opportunity to work alongside experienced teachers and other education professionals to develop your knowledge, understanding and skill in the classroom and the wider school environment. You will be able to implement theory and evidence-based understanding on an on-going and development basis into your teaching into the classroom. You will be assessed against the current statements of professional competence.

School Experience 2* 0 credits

This module, School Experience 2, follows School Experience 1 and provides opportunities for you as a trainee teacher to enhance your achievement of the professional standards and expectations of teaching through practical, school-based experience. You will have the opportunity to work independently supported by experienced teachers and other education professionals to further develop your knowledge, understanding and skill in the classroom and the wider school environment. You will be able to implement theory and evidence-based understanding on an on-going and development basis into your teaching into the classroom. You will be assessed against the current statements of professional competence.

* School Experience 2 is dependent upon the successful completion of School Experience 1.

Download course specification

Course structure.

This postgraduate course takes place over one year full-time. Note that all PGCE with QTS courses commence teaching in the first week of September.

You’ll find that the Secondary PE PGCE is an intensive and demanding course which challenges people who are highly committed to teaching young people. It is an excellent way to prepare for a career within the profession.

We’ll deliver the course using a combination of workshops, lectures and seminar groups, and by encouraging individual study.

You’ll also complete a profile of evidence towards the achievement of the Teachers’ Standards required by the Department for Education for the award of Qualified Teacher Status.

The main thrust of the curriculum involves the study of education, pedagogy and professional practice, from both generic professional educational and subject-specific perspectives.

At least two-thirds of this course takes place off campus within schools. This means you have the opportunity to gain valuable ‘hands on’ experience in at least two different schools. In most cases you’ll also have the chance to visit other schools, including a primary school.

Trainee teachers are expected to take significant responsibility for their own progress and development. This type of professional development encourages the development of independent, creative practitioners who will be able to take the lead in the future.

120 days across a minimum of two school placements. Placement 1: September to December. Placement 2: January to June.

In September a three week block of daily University based sessions in preparation for school placement 1.

In January a two week block of daily University based sessions in preparation for school placement 2.

Every Monday Subject pedagogy sessions take place from September to January. 

Employability

This is an 11-16 years course, with post-16 enhancement, which offers a high degree of employability within secondary teaching.

The high demand for our trained teachers and our consistently high employability scores mean that trainees who successfully complete the course to a high standard have very good employment prospects.

Two-thirds of your course takes place in school and we ensure that you are offered a number of placements in a wide range of educational establishments.

You will do work placements in at least two different schools and also visit others – including a primary. This all helps you to see how teachers are working in practice and gives you a wealth of experience.

You will have the opportunity to do serial and block placements and you will also have trained mentors, who will guide and support your studies and provide you with feedback.

More about our placement opportunities

International

Birmingham City University is a vibrant and multicultural university in the heart of a modern and diverse city. We welcome many international students every year – there are currently students from more than 80 countries among our student community.

The University is conveniently placed, with Birmingham International Airport nearby and first-rate transport connections to London and the rest of the UK.

Our international pages contain a wealth of information for international students who are considering applying to study here, including:

  • Explore some of the good reasons why you should study here .
  • Find out how to improve your language skills before starting your studies.
  • Find all the information relevant to applicants from your country .
  • Learn where to find financial support for your studies.

Facilities & Staff

University House

Our Facilities

We are constantly investing in our estate and have spent £400 million on new learning facilities.

This course will be based at our City Centre Campus in the newly refurbished University House building.

Grant Huddleston

College academic lead for LLE and CPD

Grant is the course leader for the BA/BSc Hons. Secondary Education (QTS) courses and a senior lecturer in Physical Education. When starting at Birmingham City University in 2017, Grant was the subject leader for Physical Education, working across primary and secondary education on the BA (QTS) Primary Education, PGCE Primary Education (QTS), and...

UK prospective students

  • Contact the enquiries team
  • T: +44 (0)121 331 6295

Non-UK prospective students

  • E: International enquiry form
  • T: +44 (0)121 331 5389

Already applied?

  • E: Contact the admissions team

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PGCE with QTS Secondary Physical Education

This course is open for applications

To apply for PGCE Physical Education please apply using course code C6X1 .

To apply for PGCE Physical Education with EBacc please apply using course code C6X3 .

The deadline for International applications is Friday 14 June and for Home applications is Monday 15 July.

Page last updated 3 May 2024

Introduction

Study a PGCE that enables you to use your passion for sport to shape the lives of secondary school children. After graduating as a qualified PE teacher, you'll design your own lessons that bring sport and physical activity to life.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary Physical Education is a one-year course that leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). You'll train to become a Physical Education teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). You'll gain 60 academic credits at master's level as part of the course. 

Teaching is both a challenging and a rewarding career with a high level of job satisfaction. It is a great privilege, as well as a great responsibility, to play such a key role in young people's lives. We focus on supporting our trainees to thrive, and we do this alongside teachers and mentors in school. We also facilitate you to collaborate with your peers, and to graduate with a ready-made, supportive professional network.  

All our courses are future-facing and underpinned by a strong values base. Our provision directly addresses education for sustainable futures. We equip you to be able to work thoughtfully, creatively and successfully with your learners. At UWE Bristol, we're committed to training reflective, innovative, and adaptable teachers for the future.   

As time spent on campus is limited, many students choose to commute from further afield.

Find out why you should  train to teach with us .

Studying a PGCE at UWE Bristol

PGCE students talk about the support they have received from the PGCE programme at UWE Bristol. This is the first of three talks. Find out more .

The PGCE Physical Education course includes many learning opportunities led by experienced professionals to develop students' subject expertise.

To develop expertise in your specialist subject area you'll:

  • learn through doing - integrating theory with practical experiences to unpick what meaningful Physical Education experiences truly entail.
  • become innovatively responsive to evolving youth cultures, comfortable in challenging both your own and others' beliefs and teaching practices to make Physical Education relevant to every young person. 
  • reflect critically and constructively on national and regional priorities, policies and cutting-edge educational research. 
  • acquire subject knowledge on how to effectively plan and teach engaging Physical Education learning experiences that nurture pupil motivation, confidence, competence and knowledge and understanding. 
  • explore critical and inclusive pedagogies through instructional models in Physical Education to promote engagement and improve pupil progress.
  • study a physical literacy-informed Physical Education Curriculum - 'learning to move' and 'moving to learn' to develop lifelong participation in physical activity. 

You'll study the following modules:

  • Curriculum, Pedagogy and Practice 
  • Becoming a Transformational Teacher 
  • Professional Practice A 
  • Professional Practice B

PGCE Physical Education with EBacc 

We also welcome applications from candidates who wish to specialise in Physical Education but have a real interest in an additional subject at Key Stage 3 (Year 7-9). This route offers you the opportunity to cover everything within the standard Physical Education programme, whilst developing additional skills and experiences in your chosen EBacc subject. You'll be required to do a small amount of teaching in your EBacc subject, although this is not formally assessed. The EBacc route offers you a greater level of flexibility in your teaching and could be very beneficial in securing future employment.  

The University continually enhances our offer by responding to feedback from our students and other stakeholders, ensuring the curriculum is kept up to date and our graduates are equipped with the knowledge and skills they need for the real world. This may result in changes to the course. If changes to your course are approved, we'll inform you.

This award leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The focus for achieving QTS is particularly in the practice modules. UWE Bristol has chosen Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) as our accredited provider for the QTS elements of the course. We work with SHU to provide high-quality courses and share excellent practice. Together, our teacher training will help you shape the future of children and young people. 

Learning and Teaching

The PGCE courses are part of a broad range of specialist education provision in the School of Education and Childhood at UWE Bristol.

You'll be supported in school by a mentor, who liaises closely with your UWE Bristol tutor. You'll work with close support and encouragement to develop your understanding and skills, set targets, and evidence your progress. We'll challenge you to evaluate and improve throughout your course, and we'll help you to celebrate your achievements. 

The PGCE course is designed so that your experiences on placement are complemented by university-based learning. You'll learn through lectures, seminars, directed tasks, school-based experiences, intensive training and practice opportunities, independent study, online learning and collaboration, subject-specific practical work, assessment tasks, reflection and debate. Research-informed practice underpins the course. 

Throughout the course you'll be supported by your tutors, external specialists, and expert colleagues in early years settings and schools to apply your knowledge and understanding in school to equip you to meet the Teachers' Standards, to teach and assess in the Secondary Physical Education (11-16).

See our full  glossary of learning and teaching terms .

Assessment is based on professionally focused assignments and the final block school experience. 

To gain the award of PGCE, you need to pass each academic assessment as well as pass classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Learn more about assessments .

As a trainee teacher, you'll complete 120 days in school placement practice blocks in at least two different schools, plus further focused teaching experiences. You'll practise as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16), and gain experience of the 16-18 age range. 

The schools and settings within our Initial Teacher Training partnership are geographically diverse, with placements in Bristol, South Gloucestershire, Bath and North East Somerset, Somerset, Wiltshire, Devon, Cornwall and Wales. We work hard to match placements to trainee teacher needs, experience and locations. 

At UWE Bristol, we'll support you to become an authentic, effective, thoughtful teacher. Towards the end of your course, your progress review will enable your entry to the teaching profession and your ongoing development as an Early Career Teacher (ECT). 

Study facilities

Learn more about UWE Bristol's  facilities and resources . 

Get a feel for the  Education and Teaching facilities  we offer at UWE Bristol.

Postgraduate support

Our support includes access to fantastic facilities, study tools and career consultants, plus practical help to access everything from funding to childcare.

A stunning city for student living with all the qualities to make you want to stay.

Sports, societies and activities

There is more to your experience here than study. Choose to make the most of it and try new things.

Health and Wellbeing

We provide support in the way you need it.

Campus and facilities

Discover our campuses and the wealth of facilities provided for our students.

Careers / Further study

PGCE courses include 60 credits assessed at Masters level.

As a trainee teacher, you'll be joining a modern and well-regarded course to train to teach across the 11-16 age range and gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Full time course

Indicative additional costs, supplementary fee information.

The PGCE is financed as an undergraduate course. More information on fees can be found on our  tuition fees pages .

For funding options, please see  funding for PGCE students .

Entry requirements

  • An undergraduate honours degree, or a recognised equivalent qualification. This is typically 2:2 or higher.
  • A substantial amount (at least 50%) of your degree should be in a subject related to what you want to teach. 
  • GCSE grade C/4 or above in English and Mathematics, or equivalent. We do not accept Level 2 Key Skills, Functional Skills or Certificates in Adult Numeracy and Literacy as alternatives to GCSEs. Candidates with pending GCSEs will be considered.  Where applicants have achieved a GCSE grade 4 or above in English Literature only, we'll look for further evidence of achievement in English.  
  • To be eligible for the PGCE in PE with EBacc route, applicants must have an A level at grade C or above in an EBacc subject (English, Maths, Science, Modern Foreign Languages, Geography, History, Computer science).

We'll look at all applications against the demands of the course. If you have any questions about our entry requirements, please contact our Admissions team and we can discuss your application.

Our PGCE courses include a high level of placement-based learning and working with children. We would encourage all applicants to get as much relevant experience of working or volunteering with children to help prepare them for this crucial element of their course.

Selection process

Applicants who meet the entry criteria will be invited to an interview. We want to ensure you get all the information you need about the course and about studying at UWE Bristol, and that you can meet members of the course team. There'll be a group discussion and an interview, and you'll get plenty of opportunities to ask questions.

You can find top tips on how to write your teacher training personal statement on Get Into Teaching.

Additional requirements (as mandated by the DfE)

  • Health checks - for Fitness to Teach.
  • A clear Enhanced DBS Disclosure including check of children's barred list.
  • Satisfactory references including one from latest employer and/or latest role involving working with children.
  • Verification of identity and right to work in the UK.
  • Check for sanction, restriction or prohibition on teaching issued by the Teaching Regulation Agency (TRA) (if in teaching role).
  • Criminal records checks overseas . If you have lived, studied or worked overseas for five months or more in the last five years a Certificate of Good Conduct from the country of residence will be required even if you are a UK applicant or currently based in the UK.

The university will also check that candidates are not :

  • subject to a prohibition order issued by the Secretary of State
  • disqualified from childcare
  • or have obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted.

All information will be treated in confidence.

Further Statutory Guidance

  • Supervision of activity with children
  • Working together to safeguard children
  • Keeping children safe in education

If you would like information regarding issues that could disqualify you from teaching training, please contact us on +44 (0)117 32 83333 .

Standards and requirements

Following the review of Standards and Requirements for Initial Teacher Training (ITT) by the Secretary of State in 2012 (revised in June 2013), our full-time courses have been designed to be compliant with the  latest standards and requirements .

Find out further information about the  national curriculum and subjects taught in secondary schools .

English Language Requirement

All International and EU applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 7.0 with 6.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

Due to a high level of placement based learning and working with children, all applicants should have an effective command of the English language and be able to use it appropriately, accurately and fluently in a school setting. International and EU students will be required to produce a certificate evidencing the necessary IELTS or approved equivalent*.

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you'll need in our English Language section .

How to apply

Please see the Department for Education pages for guidance on how to apply.

Our PGCE courses begin on 2 September and require sufficient time to review applications, process decisions and fulfil additional entry requirements as mandated by DfE.

The deadline for Home applications is Monday 15 July , with final interviews being held on Wednesday 24 July.

The deadline for International applications is Friday 14 June , with final interviews being held on Wednesday 26 June.

We encourage you to apply for our PGCE courses as early as possible in the cycle in order to be guaranteed consideration. Many of our courses are very popular and will reach their capacity and be closed to further recruitment prior to the application deadlines given above.

Read more about international applications and key international deadline dates .

For further information

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Personal statement for PGCE primary

This is your chance to explain why you want to teach primary age children and convey your enthusiasm for teaching

This example should be used for guidance only. Copying any of this text could significantly harm your chances of securing a place on a course.

Example personal statement for PGCE primary

In my early education, reading and writing were a challenge. At age nine I received a diagnosis of dyslexia bringing with it extra support from the school. This gave me a real determination to overcome my disability. It drove me to study hard, achieve high GCSE and A-level grades and go on to achieve a 2:1 in criminology at the University of England. Although this is not a national curriculum subject, working through and coping with my dyslexia at university helped me nurture my own love of learning. I aim to emulate the support provided to me to ensure that no child is left behind in their learning due to barriers they may experience. I believe that being dyslexic will give me a unique insight into the support requirements of dyslexic children but I am aware that children face many other personal, social and emotional challenges alongside learning disabilities. Recognising these barriers and helping each child to have the confidence to succeed is one goal I hope to achieve as a teacher.

I began spending one day a week, then two days a week in a primary school, which has strengthened my love of learning. I spent time in both Key Stage 1 and 2 classrooms and have so far completed 40 days in a school. I observed lessons such as English, maths, Spanish, science and art, listened to pupils read, and went on to work with small groups. I started to grasp lesson planning and discuss with teachers' current educational issues, such as the changing curriculum. I was able to observe how different teachers handle classroom and behaviour management, particularly picking up on the importance of maintaining an assertive yet sympathetic style. This all shapes my classroom practice to become more effective, for example seeing someone moving up a reading band as a result of the extra time I gave to them. Recently I saw a child making good decisions with their behaviour as a result of the plans we made together. I am gaining experience currently with a year three class of 30 children, working with them one-to-one, in groups and leading the whole class. Learning to think on my feet numerous times a day is challenging but rewarding, especially when I receive positive feedback on my lessons.

For the past two years I have been a volunteer leader with my local Cub Scout group, consisting of 30 boys and girls aged between eight and ten years. This encompasses weekly meetings, trips and overnight camps. During camps, along with the other leaders, I am responsible for the children's physical and emotional wellbeing. I need many of the skills I have seen in the classroom to be an excellent leader. A highlight was being able to use my craft and sewing skills to instigate and lead a mural making project with the completed mural now proudly displayed in the scout hut. Resilience, good judgement, enthusiasm, energy, patience, creativity, responsibility, leadership, reliability and stamina are all essential. Being a volunteer leader has helped me grow my confidence, leadership and communication skills, which I look forward to bringing into the classroom.

Through my studies, work experience and volunteering, I have received and given feedback. I know how essential it is to provide constructive feedback that will help the recipient learn and develop rather than become demoralised. I have witnessed teachers providing meaningful and specific feedback to pupils and how this raises their self-esteem. I have learned from this and practised it in my own interactions with children, with positive results.

I wish to specialise in working with Key Stages 1 and 2 as I feel it is demanding but hugely rewarding to work with children at this vital formative period in their educational development. I am aware that the children within each class could be at vastly different levels in relation to their abilities.. Being able to confidently ascertain their levels and differentiate the work accordingly is something that I know I will need to master.

I achieved high grades in law, biology and statistics at A-level. I believe these subjects have provided me with a broad knowledge base to enable me to teach the full primary national curriculum. Even though I didn’t study any design-related subjects at college, I do consider myself a creative person so would relish the chance to teach subjects such as art, music and drama alongside the core subjects of English, maths and science.

My criminology degree provided me with many relevant skills including data analysis, essay writing, critical analysis and research. I also developed the ability to work to a deadline under pressure, both independently and in groups, something I feel is directly relevant to teaching. Learning about the social inequalities in society alongside modules on safeguarding have provided me with a deeper insight into the affect these things can have, not only on a child but also the family and wider community. 

During my degree I undertook a one-month work placement with a homeless charity. I was tasked with trying to find valuable work experience to boost the self-esteem and self-worth of the individuals. This was a humbling and eye-opening experience. I met some truly amazing people both within the charity and among the service users. The many knock backs I received from companies helped to build my resilience and determination culminating in successfully finding an organisation that was willing to offer experience and training in the catering industry.

I believe that schools should be a safe and welcoming environment where children feel comfortable to express themselves, which in turn will aid their ability and willingness to learn. I hope that I will one day be able to provide this to all the children I teach.

Tailor your statement to primary teaching and include:

  • Why you'd like to teach this age group.
  • Elements from your degree that have helped to prepare you to become a primary school teacher.
  • Skills you have developed and where you gained them, such as communication, patience, resilience and planning.
  • Any examples you have working with the age group you wish to teach. This could be classroom based as well as through play schemes, youth groups and summer camps.
  • Any specialist training such as safeguarding, first aid or mentoring.
  • How your own educational background has influenced your desire to teach.
  • Your understanding of the primary national curriculum.
  • Your thoughts on children's wellbeing within the education system.

Find out more

  • Read all about applying for teacher training .
  • Get prepared with our teaching interview questions .
  • See more examples of teaching personal statements .

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Primary Teacher PGCE Personal Statement

If you are applying to PGCE Primary, you will need to prepare a good personal statement. Learn how to prepare your application for PGCE from our Primary PGCE Personal Statement example .

Primary Teacher Personal Statement Example

One day, I hope to become a primary teacher. Primary and secondary education have both been highly positive experiences for me. It is my desire to inspire and encourage children of all abilities to achieve their full potential that drives me to apply for primary education.

I gained valuable experience working in a primary school setting from the perspective of a teacher. The uniqueness of each child and the way each day is different is what I enjoyed most about my job. I am also applying for a History degree since this would allow me to study a P.G.C.E. after I complete my undergraduate studies. I have always enjoyed Art, particularly the early modern era up until the 20th century, a period I find fascinating. Researching the history of my family and the local area is my favourite aspect of Art history. I have arranged a work experience placement at a local primary school on Monday morning during my free periods. I have gained a great deal of insight into the challenges and situations primary school teachers face. As a teacher, I have been able to provide extra support to students who are underachieving in literacy and numeracy. I have improved my interpersonal skills immensely as I have had to communicate with children of different abilities, cultures and religions from Primary 1 to Primary 7. In addition to being challenging, it is also extremely enjoyable. I am most enjoying helping with small group work and projects with Primary 3 to 7 classes, assisting the pupils in History and English lessons, and using ICT as an educational and motivational tool. When I see pupils who struggled in these areas improve, it is very rewarding for me.

I have also participated in the school’s Community Care program, where I visited a residential care home once a week and spoke with the residents. Their personal perspectives on childhood experiences and the past were enjoyable to hear. By performing songs on guitar, accordion, and voice for residents, and reading novels and poems to them, I have become more approachable, confident, and trustworthy. I have served as Chairperson of the Eco-School’s Committee for four years in school.

Further, I have enjoyed attending debates and lectures from renowned historians such as Senia Paseta, Richard Grayson, and Philip Orr as a member of the Omagh Academy History Society. In my free time, I’m a member of the Bridge Club of Leeds.

My Queen’s Badge is something I’m aiming toward having recently earned my President’s Award. I assist in the Boy area, which serves boys between the ages of 4 and 7, in order to obtain more experience working with kids. It is my obligation to organize and present drills, games, and Bible tales. I also like to play a variety of musical instruments, such as the lambing drum, accordion, guitar, and flute. I am actively involved in the Omagh Community Youth Choir and am pursuing my Grade 5 on the guitar. I have performed with the choir as a support act for the Red Hot Chilli Pipers at the SSE Arena in Belfast.

I learned how crucial it is for primary school teachers to be able to play an instrument at school concerts and events through my work placement. I have joined the Fintona Taekwondo Club with enthusiasm. It has helped me become more tenacious, determined, polite, and disciplined. Taekwondo has helped me stay physically active, and I intend to continue practising it when I’m in college since I find it to be a wonderful stress reliever. I think I’m a good fit for this profession because I want to be a teacher in the long run. My decision to apply for primary courses has been solidified by my great experiences with work placement and volunteer work with the Boys’ Brigade’s Anchor Boys section.

Recommended reading:

  • Personal Statement Examples
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  • UCAS Personal Statement: A Writing Guide And Tips For Success
  • How to Write a Personal Statement That Stands Out
  • Tips for Writing a Personal Statement for the University
  • How to Write UCAS Reference Letter

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  • About the Prevention Effectiveness Fellowship
  • What Fellows Do
  • Fellow Stories

Prepare & Submit Fellowship Application

  • Applicants should begin preparing information early to meet the application deadline.
  • Detailed instructions are provided as a guide to preparing required information and submitting the online application.

Eligible applicants should allow ample time to prepare the required information and submit the online application according to the deadline .

How to prepare

Eligible applicants should follow these steps to prepare the required information prior to starting the application for the Traditional Track or the Analytics and Modeling Track.

  • Update your resume or CV.
  • Gather all information about your education; graduate training and skills; work and volunteer experience; publications, presentations, and grants; working papers; honors and awards.
  • Write a personal statement.
  • Identify three or more people to provide recommendations on your behalf.
  • If any of your degrees were obtained from an institution outside the U.S., you will also need a course-by-course credential evaluation.

Self-Assessment of Skills

Notate your experience and level of expertise in:

  • computer software
  • economic and public health data sets
  • data science (wrangling, cleansing, modeling, analytics)
  • data science methods (machine learning, NLP, deep learning)
  • data design and development (big data, data modeling, info retrieval)
  • programming languages and scripting (Python, R, C, C++)

Personal Statement

For your personal statement, answer the following:

  • What influenced you to consider a career in public health service?
  • Describe how this fellowship/track will help you achieve your goals.
  • Describe your greatest professional challenge so far and how you overcame it.
  • Describe your use of analytic methods. What methods would you like to learn more about?
  • Why are you interested in this fellowship/track?
  • What makes you a good candidate for this fellowship/track?
  • Why do you want to join the CDC?
  • How do you anticipate using the concepts and skills learned in this fellowship/track? Be as specific as possible.
  • Describe your experience related to data management and analysis, including the use of statistical software packages such as Excel, SAS, STATA, R, or Epi Info. Please provide specific examples.

Recommendations

  • Two of the recommendations must be from people who are non-CDC employees.
  • You will provide their name, organization, title, phone, email, relationship to applicant
  • specific to the PE Fellowship Traditional Track or Analytics and Modeling Track application
  • dated within six months of the application
  • written in English
  • Persons writing recommendations should typically be current or former supervisors, colleagues or professors/faculty members. Select individuals familiar with your achievements, aspirations, and personal qualities that distinguish you as a good candidate for the PE Fellowship Traditional Track or Analytics and Modeling Track.
  • All recommendations are required to be submitted by the application deadline.

Transcripts

The application requires copies of unofficial transcripts for all earned undergraduate and graduate degrees or qualifying degrees in progress.

  • For this requirement, an applicant must provide an academic credentialing evaluation for any degree from a non-US academic Institution before the July deadline.
  • For more information about the academic credentialing evaluation process and to submit the applicant's degrees for evaluation, please visit The National Association of Credential Evaluation Services .
  • All academic credentialing evaluations documents or unofficial transcripts are required to be submitted by the application deadline.
  • Transcripts must state the applicant's degree of study, courses taken, earned grades, and graduation date if the degree has been conferred.
  • Transcripts and other proof of degree completion will not be returned.

How to apply

Once you have prepared the above information, you are ready to start the online application. The link for the online application is only provided and active during open application periods.

The application will prompt you for:

  • Citizenship status
  • Self assessment of skills
  • Education and licenses
  • Work and volunteer experience
  • Training and skills
  • Publications, presentations, grants
  • Awards and honors
  • Personal statement
  • Three letters of recommendations
  • Unofficial college or university transcript
  • Applicant survey

Please complete all sections of the application. When you are finished, select submit. You will receive an email notification stating that your application has been successfully submitted.

All supporting documents (e.g., recommendation forms; unofficial transcripts or evaluation of transcripts) must be submitted by the application deadline.

For questions about the application process for the Traditional Track or Analytics and Modeling Track, please send an email to [email protected] .

  • Public Health Infrastructure Center
  • Division of Workforce Development

CDC Steven M. Teutsch Prevention Effectiveness (PE) Fellowship

The CDC Steven M. Teutsch Prevention Effectiveness Fellowship is a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship that provides experience in assessing the effectiveness and economic efficiency of public health interventions.

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COMMENTS

  1. Physical Education Personal Statement

    Physical Education Personal Statement. An active lifestyle has fuelled my passion for Physical Education (PE). Physical activity has played a large part in my life from dancing to competitive swimming I have always enjoyed taking part in sport and the feeling of well-being it brings. Since starting high school it's been my ambition to become a ...

  2. Writing a PGCE personal statement

    Your personal statement should be: no more than 1000 words. written in the first-person. grammatically correct - we suggest writing in a document before adding to your application. your own work, don't copy from anywhere online. structured correctly with a clear introduction, evidenced paragraphs and a conclusion.

  3. Personal statement for PGCE secondary

    Example personal statement for PGCE secondary. I became interested in teaching after realising how much I had benefited from excellent and passionate teachers. They exuded a real sense of enthusiasm for learning, which inspires me to pass on that passion. My love for computing developed during my A-levels after discovering an aptitude for ...

  4. Physical Education Personal Statement Example

    Physical Education Personal Statement Example. Whether watching or participating, Sport can be fun, exciting and at times rewarding. This is a personal view, but it is likely to be a view which is shared by other people of all ages. My enthusiasm for Sport first came to light when I was picked to try out for the County Trials, in Netball.

  5. How to Write a PGCE Personal Statement [with Examples]

    A PGCE personal statement is written as part of the application process for teacher training and gives candidates an opportunity to showcase their skills and attributes.. PGCE candidates will only write one personal statement, which is used to apply for all of their preferred choices. Students upload their personal statement to the UCAS Teacher Training system, and it is submitted for all ...

  6. PGCE Personal Statement Sample

    This PGCE Personal Statement sample will hopefully aid you in your quest to gaining the education that you so desire. ... Personal Statement Service. The Old Dairy 12 Stephen Road Headington, Oxford, OX3 9AY United Kingdom. VAT Number 425 5446 95. 24/7 0800 334 5952 London 020 364 076 91

  7. How to write a PGCE personal statement

    Your structure can look something like: Introduction - about yourself and why you want to do the PGCE. Middle paragraphs - relevant information of your academic achievements and experiences of working within education. Concluding paragraph - tying up the main points of why you're the best candidate for the course.

  8. Writing a personal statement for a PGCE

    Your Personal Statement should: be persuasive. be fluent, realistic, relevant and specific. mention young people- it is about enabling them to learn rather than why you want to teach. be honest. Avoid: overuse of short sentences all beginning with 'I'. general statements and narrative.

  9. Writing a Postgraduate Teacher Education personal statement

    A personal statement is a short piece of writing (47 lines/4000 characters) which you are asked to submit in support of your application to study a PGDE/CE made through UCAS. It is your opportunity to demonstrate your skills, experience and motivation for teaching. Before you start. Remember that this is a very important part of your application.

  10. PGCE Personal Statement Examples

    A personal statement is a critical aspect of your application and is the deciding factor in whether to invite you for an interview. If your personal statement is poorly written, it can lead to you not acquiring a place on your teacher training. Most PGCE personal statement examples include information about the writer.

  11. How to write your PGCE Personal Statement

    Here are some key skills to mention when writing your PGCE personal statement: Management skills. Organisational skills. Teamwork skills. Training and coaching experience. Direct contact and engagement with children. Communication with a range of audiences. IT and computer literacy.

  12. PE Personal Statement Example

    I appreciate all sports, but my particular favourites are football and skiing, as well as exercising at the gym. I am always keen to keep as fit as possible, believing strongly in the contribution physical fitness makes to health and to mental well-being. I also enjoy music. I am hard-working and conscientious and a disciplined learner, always ...

  13. Physical Education Personal Statement Examples

    Generally, physical education teachers earn an average salary of £24,000 to £32,000 per year. Those with more experience or higher qualifications can earn up to £50,000 per year. In terms of trends in the job market, there is a growing demand for physical education teachers in the UK, with the number of job openings increasing by 6% in 2020.

  14. PDF How to Write a PGCE Personal Statement

    VDOM DHTML TML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">. 307 Temporary Redirect.

  15. Teacher Training Personal Statement

    How to write it. You can use up to 47 lines of text (4,000 characters) in your personal statement. Some word processing packages calculate line counts differently from the UCAS Teacher Training system, so you might need to redraft your statement if there's a discrepancy between the counts. Write in English (or Welsh if you're applying to ...

  16. Secondary Physical Education

    Primary and Early Years (Physical Education) with QTS - PGCE 2024/25 Entry. ... Personal statement. You'll need to submit a personal statement as part of your application for this course. This will need to highlight your passion for postgraduate study - and your chosen course - as well as your personal skills and experience, academic ...

  17. Teaching personal statement examples

    Personal statement for PGCE secondary. Many good PGCE secondary personal statements acknowledge the challenges involved in teaching older pupils and provide examples of where the candidate has worked to overcome these problems. As secondary teaching roles are geared towards teaching a specific subject, training providers are looking for more ...

  18. Secondary Physical Education

    The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) Secondary Physical Education is a one-year course that leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). You'll train to become a Physical Education teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). You'll gain 60 academic credits at master's level as part of the course.

  19. Personal statement for PGCE primary

    Personal statement for PGCE primary. Jude Hanley, Careers adviser. October, 2022. This is your chance to explain why you want to teach primary age children and convey your enthusiasm for teaching. This example should be used for guidance only. Copying any of this text could significantly harm your chances of securing a place on a course.

  20. Primary Teacher PGCE Personal Statement Example

    Primary Teacher Personal Statement Example. One day, I hope to become a primary teacher. Primary and secondary education have both been highly positive experiences for me. It is my desire to inspire and encourage children of all abilities to achieve their full potential that drives me to apply for primary education.

  21. How to write your PGCE Personal Statement

    Here are some key skills to mention when writing your PGCE personal statement: Management skills. Organisational skills. Teamwork skills. Training and coaching experience. Direct contact and engagement with children. Communication with a range of audiences. IT and computer literacy.

  22. Prepare & Submit Fellowship Application

    Write a personal statement. Identify three or more people to provide recommendations on your behalf. Obtain unofficial copies of transcripts for all earned and in-progress college degrees. If any of your degrees were obtained from an institution outside the U.S., you will also need a course-by-course credential evaluation. Self-Assessment of Skills