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12 Fun ESL Speaking Activities for Teens or Adults

Every language teacher knows that speaking is a core skill to teach and practice, but sometimes it can be challenging coming up with creative or engaging ESL speaking activities and games. You can use them to improve the community feeling inside the classroom , too.

Let’s dive into nine quick, easy, and fun ESL speaking activities for teenagers and adults you can integrate into your lessons or use in speaking clubs.

They are designed to be high-quality and enjoyable – and mostly suitable for online lessons, too.

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They don’t need much preparation, but will get your students talking and help them to hone their conversational skills without even thinking about it.

ESL Speaking Activities for teens and adults

1. Interview Pop

2. word racing, 3. guess who or what i am, 4. would you rather…, 5. how-to presentation, 6. living memory, 7. video talk, 8. talk about your weekend, 9. timed discussion, 10. debating club, 11. taboo words, 12. story chain.

Student level:  Pre-Intermediate to Advanced Type of Lesson:  Group or Individual

This is a great one for students to have fun and be creative. Put students in pairs, or you could also carry this one out in a one-one lesson.

Students choose one person they want to interview. It can be anybody of their choice, and the person doesn’t necessarily have to be alive still.

I tell students to choose someone they know a lot about or who they admire because then they’ll have more material to talk about when the speaking part of the activity comes around.

Give each student a list of ten to fifteen verbs. (Can be the same list or different) See the example:

Each student has to choose five verbs from their list.

They make a different question using one of their five verbs in each question; these questions are made for the person they want to interview.

Each question will have a different verb.

For example, let’s say a student chooses Barack Obama. They have to make five interview questions for Barack Obama, each question using a different verb from their list.

Here are some examples:

  • How did you decide you want to become president?
  • Did you want to continue being president after your term finished?
  • What did you love about being the president?
  • What would you change about the USA?
  • What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishment as president?

While I usually just come up with the verbs myself, you can also find  some verb lists  online, along with a list of people for your students to choose from.

While the students are making their questions, go through the class and help students fix the grammatical mistakes.

This is a great activity if you are practicing  question formation  as a grammar topic with your students.

The students then give their partner the questions that they wrote and then assume the role of the person they wanted to interview, while their partner asks them the questions they just made.

So this means that each student answers the questions from the perspective of the person they wanted to interview, as their partner asks them the questions.

Go around and listen for mistakes.

You could also then have students report to the class the person their partner chose and how they responded to the questions.

Student level:  Pre-Intermediate to Advanced Type of Lesson:  Group

A very interactive and high-energy ESL speaking activity. Many students get so into it and excited that they won’t even notice they are speaking in a foreign language and won’t even have time to think about making mistakes.

All you need to prepare for the game is to write down 15-20 vocabulary terms you want to practice with your students, each term is written on a different small slip of paper. Give a stack of these slips to each group.

You can also let the students write down the vocabulary (for example on the last topic they’ve learned) but then some words might be double and they also might not think of the words you want them to practice.

Divide your students into groups of three or four and explain the rules of the game.

One player from the first group starts. This student then has one minute to explain or define as many words written on their slips to their own group as they can, without saying the word they have on the card.

They want their group to guess as many words as possible in one minute.

Each time the members of the group guess a word, they put the card down, which gets them a point, and then they take a new card and repeat the same thing.

Once the minute is over, the next group takes their turn.

After the minute is up, each group counts their points and the group with the most points wins that round.

If you have time to play more rounds, after all, words are guessed, put them back in the basket and let them play again, although this time they can only use one word to explain the word on the card, for example, a synonym or a word they associate with the word on the card.

An example might be that if the word on the card is ‘handcuff’ then they say the word ‘police’ and the other students have to guess the word ‘handcuff’.

Students only get one guess. Once a student guesses, the student must move on to the next card, whether the word was guessed correctly or not.

In the last round, they act out or pantomime the words on their cards.

Here’s a list with even more fun ESL vocabulary games for adults and kids.

While there are many other good vocabulary-charades type games that can be done with both younger and older students, this one has been my favorite.

Student level:  Pre-Intermediate to Upper-Intermediate Type of Lesson:  Group

This is a very simple but effective activity with no preparation needed and can be played in two versions.

It’s usually more suitable for lower-level students but can also be used in intermediate or upper-intermediate students, especially for the other variation of the activity described below.

In version one, one student thinks of a person – it could be someone in the class or a famous person, someone that everyone is likely to know – and the rest of the class asks them yes or no questions about the person until they can guess who it is.

The student who guesses the person with the least amount of questions wins.

In version two, one student goes in front of the door, while the rest of the class decides on a person. Then the student comes back in and has to ask the class yes or no questions until they can guess who the person is.

Another variation of this game is to put students in groups and describe themselves from the perspective of an object, and the other students must guess what that object is in the quickest time possible.

Each student in the group writes down an object and then speaks from the perspective of that object as if they were actually that object.

For example, if one student chooses ‘handcuffs’ they would say something like:

  • “The police put me around somebody’s wrists when they break the law.”
  • “I have two round rings with chains connected them.”
  • “I am on a person on their way to prison.”

Students shouldn’t do any gesturing or acting on this one because that will give it away. The student who is able to guess the most objects correctly wins.

The reason I like this one more is that the students have to get a little bit more creative about expressing their ideas and they also tend to have more fun with this one.

Student level:  Intermediate to Advanced Type of Lesson:  Group or Individual

This is a great way to practice ‘would’ in the conditional form.

There’s a lot of different ways you can organize this one. One of the easiest ways is to just come up with some of your own ideas (5-10 should be enough), type them out, and cut them up into cards.

Go around the class and have a student draw a card, read it aloud, and then call on another student to answer it.

The goal is to make the “Would you rather”  questions funny, crazy, interesting, or controversial. Think about what kind of questions you think would be fun to discuss if you were learning a foreign language.

Bookmark our list of 110 “would you rather” questions, and you will never run out of great questions to discuss.

Here are a few examples:

  • Would you rather give up your mobile phone or your pet?
  • Would you rather have $50,000 that is legal or $150,000 that is illegal?
  • Would you rather be the funniest person in the room or the most intelligent?
  • Would you rather have your first child when you are 19 years old or when you are 45?

As stated before, you can make up your own. If you are doing a specific topic for your lesson, then you can try to make them as closely related to the topic as possible.

For example, if the topic for your lesson is  Meet the World’s Oldest Ice Hockey Player , then you might want to prepare some ‘would you rather’ questions about age or about hockey:

  • Would you rather stop aging at 17 or 35?
  • Would you rather date someone ten years older or ten younger?
  • Would you rather be a famous football player or a famous hockey player?

Give each group or pair of students the same card and have each of them state their opinion about the topic on the card.

You can give them a few minutes to take notes on their opinion and what they want to say before starting. Then students go around and say their opinion and support their argument.

This is one is sure to bring some good conversations and even laughs in your class.

You can also teach phrases on how to express opinions, such as:

  • “In my opinion…”
  • “I believe that…”
  • “In my eyes…”
  • “From my point of view…”

In addition to this, you could also assign students to make their own “Would you rather…” topics for the class or other groups. Make sure they keep them appropriate!

Help facilitate the conversations and ask follow-up questions while students are speaking.

This activity is great for a number of reasons: it’s simple to assign and explain, effective for students to develop speaking, and fun because it’s on a topic they’re interested in.

It’s also practical because they’re teaching the class how to do something or how something works.

Basically, all you need to do for ESL speaking activities like this one is have students choose some topic. It can be any appropriate topic according to their wishes.

Then they give a five-minute presentation on that How-to topic.

In order to get students cooperating together, you could also put them in pairs and have them decide on and organize the speech together.

Here are some of the ones my students have done before and they turned out to be great:

  • How to cook [a food]
  • How to play [a sport]
  • How to travel cheap
  • How to do a magic trick
  • How to live healthily

There are some  great tips  you can share with your students on giving a presentation in a foreign language.

Have students prepare the speech at home or during the lesson, and then have them present their topic during the next lesson.

You could take notes on their speaking or pronunciation mistakes while they present and go over them after the presentation.

Student level:  Pre-Intermediate Type of Lesson:  Group

This is a game based on the classic board game “memory” designed for lower-level students.

Two students go out of the room (Student A and Student B). The rest of the class gets together in pairs.

If you have an uneven number of students, one group can be in three.

Each pair chooses a word according to the learning objective.

For example, if your students are learning about food, then in pairs they will mutually agree on a meal or a food they both like. Then the two students come back into the classroom and these two students play against each other to gain points.

To gain points, Student A starts off and asks any student in the class “What do you like eating?” and that student answers “I like eating…”, and then Student A asks another student what they like to eat.

If the second student likes the same thing, then Student A gets one point. Then Student B goes and tries to match the pairs based on the food they mutually chose together.

This is a fun game to practice vocabulary and simple phrases.

You can make the game more interactive if students make gestures and movement demonstrating the type of food. For example, they gesture peeling a banana if the food they chose is ‘banana’.

Other good questions are:

  • What is your favorite subject?
  • What do you like doing in your free time?
  • What time is it?

Student level:  Pre-Intermediate to Advanced Type of Lesson:  Group or Individual

Find a YouTube video topic that you think would be interesting for your students. I would choose a relatively short video (two to five minutes), or something like a TedTalk.

Make some preview discussion questions about the topic presented in the video, go through them with students before watching, and then watch the video together.

You can then have some questions prepared based on the video content and some post-discussion activities while going through some of the important vocabulary terms from the video.

Students tend to love working with videos and there are so many good ones out there nowadays.

Using video is effective because it brings the outside world to your students, and they can generate some great discussions in class, inspiring students to speak their mind and share their opinions and ideas.

Browse our full archive of ESL resources and printables.

Student level:  Beginner to Intermediate Type of Lesson:  Group

This activity is a better choice if your students are happy talking but maybe are a bit nervous speaking in front of a class:

Split the class into pairs.

Students need to discuss their weekend with their partner.

Use only English!

You need to be observant with this type of activity. Keep an eye on each student’s talk time. 

If you are finding some students are much more talkative than their partners, maybe set a time limit for how long each student can talk for before switching. This ensures that everyone gets a fair chance to practise.

Information gap activities are great to practice conversation; get more ideas here.

This is another simple yet great activity for building confidence in speaking!

Give the student a topic card, for instance, “Talk about your favorite place.” or “What’s your favorite band or artist?”

The student has a certain amount of time to prepare some ideas for what they will say.

The student then has to talk about that topic for a chosen amount of time.

When starting out with this activity, make sure to give more time for preparation and less time for the presentation. 5 minutes of preparation time and 1 minute of the presentation should be plenty. 

With time, you can reduce the preparation time or increase the presentation time.

Prepare a list of controversial topics, and two opposing views about each topic.

Split your students into pairs or small groups (each with an even number of students). Split each groups into two parties. Assign a topic to each group: each party has to hold an opposite view.

Give them some time to prepare arguments for their standpoint. 5 to 10 Minutes should be enough.

Then let each group debate their topic in front of the class. One party starts voicing their first argument, then the other answers.

Each statement shouldn’t exceed 30 seconds – use a stopwatch with a countdown, so students know when they have to stop.

The debate is over after a set time – for example 5 minutes – or when the parties stated all their arguments.

After each debate, the whole class votes which party was more convincing and won the debate.

If it’s an individual lesson, you and the student play the opposite parties – no final vote then.

Make sure to prepare topics according to the fluency level of your students. The topics can be rather serious and controversial, or fun and weird.

Here are a couple of examples:

Current and serious topics:

  • Classroom instruction vs. Homeschooling
  • Self-driving cars: smart or dangerous
  • Buy local vs. buy online
  • Death sentence: yes or no
  • iOS vs. Android

Fun and weird topics:

  • Vanilla vs. chocolate ice-cream
  • Get up early vs. go to bed late
  • Have no kids vs. have 5 kids
  • Travel to Mars vs. to the earth’s core
  • Sommer vs. Winter

Student level:  Beginner to Intermediate Type of Lesson:  Group

Finally, and absolute classic activity. Split your students into groups, each with at least 3 three students.

Prepare a list of words. For each word, think about 3-5 words which can be used to describe the original word. These can be synonyms, adjectives or any kind of related terms.

  • Weather – rain, cloud, sun, forecast, outside
  • hungry – food, stomach, eat, restaurant, thirsty
  • to run – fast, quick, walk, race, legs

Write the words on cards.

Now, one student has to take one card and explain the word to the other in their group. Here’s the catch: He must not use one of the words on the card (also, no parts or variations of the words.). He must not use gestures, facial expressions or voices. He has to circumscribe the word using other verbal expressions.

The rest of the group have to guess the word. Set a time for each round, like one minute. One group has to guess as many words as possible within that time; each guess is one point.

When the explaining student uses one of the taboo words (or other taboo means), he has to skip the current word and continue with the next card.

Count the points after each round. Then, the next group has its turn. The game is over, when each student in each group had their turn to explain words. Sum up the points; the group with the most wins.

Other possible game modes: Let the groups guess one word alternating, and set a 30 seconds time limit for each guess. Or let a student explain a word to the whole class, and who guesses it first, gets a point.

Student level:  Intermediate to Advanced Type of Lesson:  Group

This activity does not only help students develop their speaking and listening skills, it also fosters critical thinking skills, creativity, and imagination.

Here’s how it works:

  • Divide the group into small teams of 3–4 people each.
  • Give each team a starting sentence, such as “Once upon a time, in a land far, far away.”
  • Set a time limit, such as 5 minutes.
  • Each team must take turns adding one sentence to the story, building from the previous sentence.
  • The team that completes the most coherent story within the time limit wins.
  • To make it more challenging, you can also include a specific vocabulary theme for the story, such as “animals” or “travel”, or you can include a twist, such as “the story must be a horror story”.
  • After the activity, teams present their story to the class.
  • Encourage the class to ask questions about the story to the teams.

6 thoughts on “12 Fun ESL Speaking Activities for Teens or Adults”

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Thank you so much! Some of the suggestions I have already used with my students, but I did get new tips too! will try them out.

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Great ideas to get my hgh school students speaking. Thanks so much

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Great… These activities are really interesting ones and are helping me a lot. Thank You So Much for Uploading….

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Great activities! Greeting from Mexico.

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Thank you! This is very clearly written with a lot of additional ideas. Useful! :)

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Thanks so much for sharing. Lots of new ideas for me.

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speaking homework esl

ESL Info

Speaking , Skills

35 ESL Speaking Activities: Engage with Fun for Better Fluency

September 1, 2023

A H M Ohidujjaman

ESL Speaking Activities

Have you ever found yourself, as an English teacher, scratching your head, trying to come up with new and engaging ESL speaking activities to get your students talking? You’re not alone. Speaking can be a tough skill to master for ESL learners, but if you can choose the right activities , you can turn this challenge into a fun and interactive learning experience for them.

In this article, you’ll discover 35 popular ESL speaking activities that really work. These activities are designed to get your students talking, whether they’re young learners or adults. They cover a range of scenarios, from casual chit-chat to formal presentations and everything in between. You can customize these activities based on your teaching methods to engage your specific learners.

So, if you’re on the hunt for fresh ideas to liven up your speaking class and help your students gain confidence in their spoken English, you’re in the right place. Let’s dive in and explore these activities together. Your next great class activity could be just a scroll away!

Table of Contents

Show and tell: engaging young minds.

Show and Tell is a classic activity that’s always a hit with young learners. It provides a platform for students to talk about something they’re passionate about, helping them practice their spoken English in a fun, personal way.

Materials Needed: The only materials required for this activity are the items that students choose to bring from home. These could be anything from a favorite toy to a cherished book or a family photo. The key is that the item should hold some significance to the student, giving them plenty to talk about.

Conducting the Activity:

  • Let students know about the upcoming Show and Tell session well in advance so they have time to select their item and prepare what they want to say.
  • On the day of the activity, each student takes turns presenting their item to the class.
  • Students should describe their item, explaining what it is and why it’s important to them. They can also share any interesting stories or facts related to the item.
  • To help students structure their presentations, you can provide sentence starters such as “This is my…”, “It’s special because…”, or “I feel… when I…”.
  • After each presentation, encourage the rest of the class to ask questions. This promotes active listening and interaction.

Benefits of the Activity: Show and Tell offers numerous benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Helps students practice their descriptive language skills.
  • Builds confidence in public speaking.
  • Fosters a sense of community as students learn more about each other.
  • Develops active listening skills as students engage with their peers’ presentations.
  • Encourages curiosity and deeper understanding as students learn to ask relevant questions.

Incorporating Show and Tell into your ESL classroom can provide a fun, low-pressure way for students to practice their speaking skills while sharing a bit of their world with their classmates.

Role Play: The Power of Pretend in ESL

Role Play is a dynamic and versatile activity that can be tailored to suit any age group or proficiency level. It involves students acting out different scenarios, which can range from everyday situations like ordering food at a restaurant , to more complex interactions such as job interviews or debates.

Materials Needed: Materials for this activity can vary depending on the scenario you choose. You might need props to set the scene or role cards with character descriptions and objectives. For more complex role plays you might also provide conversation scripts for ordering food.

  • Choose a scenario that is relevant to your students’ learning objectives and level of proficiency.
  • Explain the scenario to the students and assign roles. If necessary, provide props, role cards, or scripts.
  • Give students time to prepare for their roles. They might need to practice certain phrases, plan their dialogue, or think about their character’s motivations.
  • Have the students act out the scenario in front of the class. Encourage them to stay in character and use English to the best of their ability.
  • After the role-play, facilitate a class discussion. Ask students about the outcome of the scenario, the language used, and how they could apply what they’ve learned in real-life situations.

Benefits of the Activity: Role Play is a powerful tool in the ESL classroom. It:

  • Provides a practical context for language use, helping students understand how to use English in real-life situations.
  • Encourages creativity and improvisation, which can make speaking practice more engaging and fun.
  • Helps students develop their problem-solving skills as they navigate through the scenario.
  • Builds confidence as students get comfortable with speaking English in front of others.
  • Allows for the practice of specific language functions, such as making requests, giving advice, or expressing disagreement, in a controlled environment.

By incorporating Role Play into your lessons, you can provide your students with a safe and supportive space to practice their English speaking skills, while also preparing them for real-world interactions.

Storytelling: Creating Narratives for Language Development

Storytelling is a universal form of communication that can captivate learners of all ages. In the ESL classroom, storytelling activities can help students practice narrative tenses, descriptive language, and sequencing, all while sparking their creativity.

Materials Needed: Materials can vary based on how you choose to conduct the activity. You might need story prompts, picture cards for visual aid, or even digital tools if you’re incorporating multimedia elements.

  • Depending on your students’ proficiency level, you can provide a story prompt or let them come up with their own ideas.
  • Give students time to plan their stories. They should think about the characters, setting, and plot. For lower-level students, you can provide a story structure to guide them.
  • Students then tell their stories to the class. Encourage them to use descriptive language and narrative tenses where appropriate.
  • After each story, facilitate a brief discussion. Ask the class about the story’s sequence of events, the characters, and the overall narrative. This can reinforce comprehension and narrative skills.

Benefits of the Activity: Storytelling offers numerous benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Encourages creativity and imagination, making the learning process more engaging.
  • Helps students practice narrative tenses and descriptive language in a meaningful context.
  • Enhances students’ ability to sequence ideas logically.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students share their unique stories.
  • Fosters listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s stories.

Incorporating storytelling into your ESL lessons can provide a creative outlet for students while offering ample opportunities for language practice. Whether they’re telling tales of far-off adventures or recounting personal experiences, students will be developing their English skills every step of the way.

Picture Descriptions: Painting with Words

Picture Descriptions is an activity that can be adapted for learners of all ages and proficiency levels. It involves students describing a picture in detail, which can help them practice their descriptive language skills and expand their vocabulary.

Materials Needed: For this activity, you’ll need a variety of pictures. These could be photographs, illustrations, or even comic strips. The pictures should be rich in detail to give students plenty to talk about.

  • Distribute a picture to each student or pair of students. You can also project a picture on the board for the whole class to describe.
  • Give students time to look at their picture and think about how they will describe it.
  • Students then take turns describing their picture to the class. Encourage them to be as detailed as possible, describing not only the main elements but also the colors, shapes, and any actions or emotions they perceive.
  • After each description, you can facilitate a brief discussion. Ask the class about the details they remember, or have them guess what’s happening in the picture based on the description.

Benefits of the Activity: Picture Descriptions offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Helps students practice their descriptive language skills in a focused context.
  • Expands students’ vocabulary as they learn to describe various elements and scenes.
  • Enhances students’ observational skills as they learn to notice and describe details.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students share their descriptions with the class.
  • Fosters listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s descriptions.

By incorporating Picture Descriptions into your ESL lessons, you can provide a visual context for language practice, making the learning process more engaging and memorable for your students.

Interviews: Peer-to-Peer Learning

Interviews are a great way to get students to talk and listen to each other. This activity can be adapted to any topic, making it versatile for different lessons and proficiency levels. It’s an excellent way for students to practice question formation, active listening, and conversational skills.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a list of interview questions for this activity. These can be prepared in advance by the teacher, or you can have students come up with their own questions. The questions should be open-ended to encourage more than just yes/no answers.

  • Pair up the students and give each pair a list of interview questions. If students are creating their own questions, give them time to prepare.
  • One student in each pair takes on the role of the interviewer, while the other is the interviewee.
  • The interviewer asks the questions, and the interviewee responds. Encourage students to expand on their answers and provide as much detail as possible.
  • After a set amount of time, have the students switch roles.
  • Once all interviews are complete, facilitate a class discussion. Students can share interesting things they learned about their partner or discuss any challenges they faced during the activity.

Benefits of the Activity: Conducting interviews in the ESL classroom offers several benefits. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice question formation and response.
  • Enhances active listening skills as students engage in one-on-one conversations.
  • Encourages students to express their thoughts and opinions in English.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students interact directly with their peers.

Incorporating interviews into your ESL lessons can provide a real-world context for language practice, helping students improve their conversational skills and build stronger connections with their peers.

Debates: The Art of Argument for Adult ESL Learners

Debates are a powerful tool for advanced language learning, particularly suited to adult learners. They provide a platform for students to practice persuasive language, critical thinking, and active listening, all within the context of a structured argument.

Materials Needed: For a debate, you’ll need a list of debatable topics that are appropriate and engaging for your students. You may also want to prepare some resources or reading materials for students to research their arguments.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and assign a debate topic to each. Make sure each group is clear on which side of the argument they are on.
  • Give students time to research their topic and prepare their arguments. They should consider both their points and potential counterarguments.
  • When it’s time for the debate, each group presents their arguments, alternating between the ‘for’ and ‘against’ sides. Encourage students to rebut and respond to each other’s points.
  • After the debate, facilitate a class discussion. Ask students to reflect on the arguments presented and the language used.

Benefits of the Activity: Debates offer numerous benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a practical context for students to practice persuasive language and argumentation.
  • Enhance critical thinking skills as students have to construct and deconstruct arguments.
  • Develop active listening skills as students need to respond to each other’s points.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students present and defend their arguments.
  • Encourage students to explore different perspectives on a topic, promoting empathy and understanding.

Incorporating debates into your ESL lessons can provide a dynamic and engaging way for students to practice their English speaking skills. Not only will they be learning to express their ideas more effectively, but they’ll also be developing valuable skills in critical thinking and active listening.

Information Gap Activities: Bridging the Gap

Information Gap activities are a staple in the communicative approach to language teaching. These activities involve students having different pieces of information that they need to share with each other to complete a task. It’s a great way for students to practice asking and answering questions, giving and following directions, and explaining ideas.

Materials Needed: The materials for this activity depend on the specific task. You might need task sheets with different information, maps with missing details, or incomplete diagrams. The key is that each student or pair of students has a piece of the puzzle, and they need to communicate effectively to put it all together.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and give each a different set of information.
  • The task is for students to fill in the gaps in their information by communicating with their peers. They should ask questions, give answers, and clarify information as needed.
  • Once students believe they have completed the task, check their work. If there are any mistakes or missing information, they should go back and continue the activity.
  • After the activity, facilitate a class discussion. Reflect on the communication strategies used and the language practiced during the activity.

Benefits of the Activity: Information Gap activities offer several benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a practical context for students to practice specific language functions, such as asking and answering questions.
  • Encourage cooperative learning as students work together to complete the task.
  • Enhance problem-solving and critical thinking skills as students figure out how to obtain the information they need.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students interact directly with their peers.
  • Foster active listening skills as students need to understand their peers’ information.

Incorporating Information Gap activities into your ESL lessons can provide a fun and interactive way for students to practice their English speaking skills. They’ll be learning to communicate more effectively while also developing valuable skills in problem-solving and cooperation.

Presentations: Public Speaking in ESL

Presentations are an excellent way for students to practice their public speaking skills in English. They can present on a topic of their choice or one assigned by the teacher, providing an opportunity to practice organizing and expressing their thoughts in a structured format.

Materials Needed: Students will need time to prepare their presentations. They may also need access to resources for research, and materials or technology for visual aids, such as PowerPoint slides or posters.

  • Assign a topic or let students choose their own. The topic should be appropriate for their proficiency level and relevant to their interests or course content.
  • Give students time to prepare their presentations. They should think about how to structure their talk, what information to include, and how to make their points clear and engaging.
  • Students then deliver their presentations to the class. Encourage them to speak clearly, maintain eye contact with the audience, and use their visual aids effectively.
  • After each presentation, allow time for questions and feedback from the class.

Benefits of the Activity: Presentations offer numerous benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Help students practice organizing and expressing their thoughts in English.
  • Build confidence in public speaking.
  • Enhance research and planning skills.
  • Provide an opportunity for students to delve deeper into a topic of interest.
  • Foster active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s presentations.

Guessing Games: Fun with Descriptions for Young Learners

Guessing Games are a fun and interactive way for young learners to practice their descriptive language skills. In this activity, students describe a person, place, or thing without naming it, and the rest of the class tries to guess what it is.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a set of cards or pictures with different people, places, or things for the students to describe.

  • Give a card or picture to a student, making sure the rest of the class can’t see it.
  • The student describes the person, place, or thing on the card without saying its name.
  • The rest of the class tries to guess what the student is describing.
  • The game continues with different students taking turns to describe and guess.

Benefits of the Activity: Guessing Games offer several benefits for young ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a fun and interactive way for students to practice their descriptive language skills.
  • Encourage creativity as students think of different ways to describe the same thing.
  • Foster active listening skills as students listen to the descriptions and try to guess the answers.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students take turns describing and guessing.

News Report: Current Affairs in ESL

Creating a News Report is a dynamic activity that can help students practice formal language and reporting skills. It involves students researching a current event and presenting it as a news report, either individually or in groups.

Materials Needed: Students will need access to news resources for research. They may also need materials to create their news report, such as paper and pens for a written report, or a camera and microphone for a video report.

  • Assign a current event or let students choose their own. The event should be appropriate for their proficiency level and relevant to their interests.
  • Give students time to research the event and prepare their news report. They should think about the key facts of the event, the different perspectives involved, and how to present the information clearly and objectively.
  • Students then present their news reports to the class. Encourage them to speak clearly, use formal language, and present the information in a balanced way.
  • After each report, facilitate a class discussion about the event and the language used in the report.

Benefits of the Activity: Creating a News Report offers numerous benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a practical context for students to practice formal language and reporting skills.
  • Enhance research and critical thinking skills as students delve into a current event.
  • Foster media literacy as students learn to analyze and present news information.
  • Foster active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s reports.

Problem-Solving : Collaborative Learning in ESL

Problem-Solving activities are a great way to get students working together and communicating in English. These activities involve presenting students with a problem or challenge that they need to solve collaboratively.

Materials Needed: The materials for this activity will depend on the problem you set. You might need puzzle pieces, task cards with the problem scenario, or physical materials for a building challenge.

  • Divide the class into small groups and present each group with the same problem or challenge. This could be a riddle to solve, a mystery to unravel, or a structure to build.
  • Students work together to solve the problem, discussing their ideas and strategies in English.
  • Once the groups have completed the task, have them present their solutions to the class. Encourage them to explain their thought process and the steps they took to solve the problem.
  • Facilitate a class discussion about the different solutions and the language used during the activity.

Benefits of the Activity: Problem-Solving activities offer several benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Encourage collaborative learning as students work together to solve a problem.
  • Provide a practical context for students to practice their English speaking skills.
  • Enhance critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students interact with their peers and present their solutions.
  • Foster active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s solutions.

The Mystery Bag: Sensory Language Practice

The Mystery Bag is a fun and interactive activity for practicing sensory language and descriptive skills. It involves students feeling an object in a bag and describing it to the rest of the class, who then try to guess what it is.

Materials Needed: For this activity, you’ll need a bag and a variety of objects with different shapes, sizes, and textures.

  • Place an object in the bag without showing it to the class.
  • Have a student feel the object in the bag without looking. The student then describes the object to the class, focusing on its size, shape, texture, weight, and any other sensory details.
  • The rest of the class listens to the description and tries to guess what the object is.
  • The game continues with different students and objects.

Benefits of the Activity: The Mystery Bag offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their descriptive language skills.
  • Encourages creativity as students think of different ways to describe the same object.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to the descriptions and try to guess the answers.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students take turns describing and guessing.

Playing 20 Questions: Inquisitive Minds at Play

Playing 20 Questions is a classic game that’s perfect for practicing question formation and critical thinking skills. In this game, one student thinks of a person, place, or thing, and the rest of the class asks up to 20 yes/no questions to figure out what it is.

Materials Needed: No specific materials are needed for this activity, although you might choose to use picture cards or word cards to provide ideas for the students.

  • One student thinks of a person, place, or thing, or chooses one from a card if you’re using them.
  • The rest of the class takes turns asking yes/no questions to figure out what the student is thinking of. They can ask up to 20 questions.
  • The game continues until the class guesses correctly or they run out of questions.

Benefits of the Activity: Playing 20 Questions offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice question formation.
  • Enhances critical thinking skills as students have to think strategically about their questions.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to the answers and adjust their guesses accordingly.

Speeches: Formal Language Practice

Giving speeches is a valuable activity for more advanced ESL students. It provides an opportunity to practice formal language, public speaking, and the organization of ideas. Speech topics can range from personal experiences to persuasive arguments on current issues.

Materials Needed: Students will need time and resources to prepare their speeches. Depending on the topic, they may need to conduct research. They may also need notecards for their speaking notes or technology for any visual aids they want to use.

  • Give students time to prepare their speeches. They should think about how to structure their speech, what points they want to make, and how to support their ideas.
  • Students then deliver their speeches to the class. Encourage them to speak clearly, maintain eye contact with the audience, and use their visual aids effectively.
  • After each speech, allow time for questions and feedback from the class.

Benefits of the Activity: Giving speeches offers numerous benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice formal language and public speaking.
  • Enhances research and planning skills.
  • Builds confidence in speaking in front of others.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s speeches.

Dialogue Journals: Interactive Learning

Dialogue Journals are written conversations between the teacher and student. While not a speaking activity per se, they can help students develop their conversational skills, grammar, and vocabulary in a low-pressure environment.

Materials Needed: Each student will need a journal for this activity. This could be a physical notebook or a digital document, depending on your preference.

  • Each student starts by writing an entry in their journal. They can write about their day, ask questions, or respond to a prompt that you give them.
  • You then read each student’s entry and write a response. Your response should model correct language use and may include comments, answers to questions, or further questions to keep the conversation going.
  • The activity continues back and forth like this over time, creating an ongoing written dialogue.

Benefits of the Activity: Dialogue Journals offer several benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a low-pressure environment for students to practice their English.
  • Allow for individualized instruction as you can tailor your responses to each student’s needs.
  • Enhance writing and reading skills alongside conversational skills.
  • Foster a sense of connection between you and the student.

Charades: Non-Verbal Communication for Young Learners

Charades is a fun and interactive game that can help young learners practice their English vocabulary and sentence structure. In this game, students act out a word or phrase without speaking, and the rest of the class tries to guess what it is.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a set of cards with words or phrases for the students to act out. These could be verbs (like “jump” or “eat”), animals (like “cat” or “elephant”), or even simple sentences (like “I brush my teeth”).

  • One student chooses a card and acts out the word or phrase without speaking or making any sound.
  • The rest of the class watches and tries to guess the word or phrase. They should guess by making full sentences (like “Are you jumping?” or “Is it a cat?”).
  • The game continues with different students taking turns to act and guess.

Benefits of the Activity: Charades offers several benefits for young ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their English vocabulary and sentence structure.
  • Encourages creativity and physical movement, which can help keep young learners engaged.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to the guesses and adjust their acting accordingly.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students take turns guessing in full sentences.

Listening and Drawing: Visualizing Language

Listening and Drawing is an engaging activity that helps students practice their listening comprehension and following instructions in English. In this activity, students listen to a description or a set of instructions and draw what they hear.

Materials Needed: Students will need paper and drawing materials for this activity. You’ll need a script or a set of instructions to read out.

  • Students start with a blank piece of paper. You read out a description or a set of instructions for something to draw.
  • Students listen carefully and draw what they hear. They should not ask questions or confirm their understanding during the activity.
  • Once the drawing is complete, students can compare their drawings and discuss any differences. You can also reveal the original image or intended result for comparison.

Benefits of the Activity: Listening and Drawing offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their listening comprehension.
  • Helps students practice following instructions in English.
  • Encourages creativity and visual thinking.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students need to pay close attention to the details.
  • Builds confidence as students see the results of their listening skills.

Story Retelling: Reinforcing Narrative Skills

Story Retelling is a powerful activity to reinforce narrative skills, comprehension, and memory. In this activity, students listen to a story and then retell it in their own words.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a story for this activity. This could be a short story, a chapter from a book, or a story that you tell orally. The story should be appropriate for the students’ proficiency level.

  • Read the story to the class or have them read it individually.
  • Once they’ve heard or read the story, students take turns retelling it in their own words. They should try to include the main events and characters, but they can also add their own interpretations or details.
  • After each retelling, facilitate a class discussion about the story and the different ways it was retold.

Benefits of the Activity: Story Retelling offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Helps students practice narrative skills and comprehension.
  • Enhances memory and recall as students have to remember and retell the story.
  • Encourages creativity as students add their own interpretations or details.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s retellings.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students share their retellings with the class.

Find Someone Who: Interactive Icebreaker

Find Someone Who is a popular icebreaker activity that gets students up and moving. It involves students finding classmates who match certain criteria, providing a fun and interactive way for students to practice their question-asking and answering skills.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a worksheet with a list of criteria for this activity. The criteria could be things like “Find someone who has a pet” or “Find someone who has been to another country”.

  • Give each student a worksheet and explain the activity. Students will walk around the room and ask their classmates questions to find someone who matches each criterion.
  • Students interact with each other, asking questions and responding in English. They should try to find a different person for each criterion.
  • Once students have found someone who matches each criterion, they can sit down. You can then facilitate a class discussion about what they learned about their classmates.

Benefits of the Activity: Find Someone Who offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their question-asking and answering skills.
  • Helps students get to know each other, fostering a sense of community in the class.
  • Encourages movement and active learning.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students need to listen to and understand their classmates’ responses.

Discussion Circles: Group Conversations in ESL

Discussion Circles are a great way to get students talking about a topic in depth. In this activity, students sit in a circle and discuss a topic, question, or text, providing a structured yet flexible way to practice conversational English.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a discussion topic or question for this activity. This could be a controversial statement, a thought-provoking question, or a text that students have read.

  • Arrange the students in a circle and present the discussion topic or question.
  • Students take turns speaking, giving their opinions, responding to each other, and asking follow-up questions. Encourage them to use appropriate discussion language and to listen actively when they’re not speaking.
  • As the teacher, you can participate in the discussion, but try to let the students do most of the talking. You can also guide the discussion by asking probing questions or bringing up new points.
  • After the discussion, facilitate a class reflection. Reflect on the content of the discussion as well as the language used.

Benefits of the Activity: Discussion Circles offer several benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a structured yet flexible context for students to practice conversational English.
  • Enhance critical thinking skills as students discuss a topic in depth.
  • Foster active listening skills as students respond to each other’s points.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students express their opinions and ideas.
  • Encourage respect for different perspectives as students hear a variety of viewpoints.

Book Club: Literature in ESL

A Book Club can be a wonderful way for students to engage with English literature and practice their speaking skills. Students read a book (or a chapter of a book) and then discuss it in class, providing an opportunity to explore themes, characters, plot, and language in depth.

Materials Needed: You’ll need copies of the book for each student. Choose a book that is appropriate for your students’ proficiency level and interests.

  • Assign a book or a chapter for students to read before the class.
  • In class, facilitate a discussion about the book. Ask open-ended questions about the plot, characters, themes, and language. Encourage students to share their opinions and respond to each other’s comments.
  • After the discussion, you can focus on specific language points from the book, such as vocabulary, grammar structures, or literary devices.

Benefits of the Activity: A Book Club offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a context for students to explore English literature and culture.
  • Enhances reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students respond to each other’s comments.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students express their opinions and ideas.
  • Encourages a love of reading in English.

Dictation: Listening and Repeating

Dictation is a classic language learning activity that can help students practice their listening comprehension, spelling, and grammar. In this activity, you read a sentence or a short paragraph aloud, and students write down exactly what they hear.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a script for this activity. This could be a sentence, a paragraph, or a short text, depending on your students’ proficiency level.

  • Choose a script that is appropriate for your students’ proficiency level and relevant to your lesson content.
  • Read the script aloud at a normal pace. Students listen and write down what they hear.
  • Repeat the script a few times, allowing students to fill in any gaps or correct any mistakes.
  • Once the dictation is complete, reveal the written script. Students can then check their work and discuss any difficulties or challenges they faced.

Benefits of the Activity: Dictation offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Helps students practice their listening comprehension in a focused way.
  • Enhances spelling and grammar skills as students have to write down exactly what they hear.
  • Provides a quiet, focused activity that can balance out more interactive or noisy activities.

Travel Agency Activity: Planning and Persuasion

The Travel Agency activity is a fun and interactive way for students to practice their persuasive language skills. In this activity, students work in pairs or small groups to plan a trip and then try to persuade the rest of the class to join their tour.

Materials Needed: You’ll need resources for students to research their trip, such as travel brochures, internet access, or travel books. You might also want to provide poster paper and markers for students to create their travel advertisements.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and assign each a destination. The destination could be a city, a country, or a type of trip (like a beach vacation or a cultural tour).
  • Students research their destination and plan a trip, including the itinerary, accommodations, and attractions.
  • Students then create a travel advertisement for their trip and present it to the class, trying to persuade their classmates to join their tour.
  • After all the presentations, the class votes on which trip they would most like to join.

Benefits of the Activity: The Travel Agency activity offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice persuasive language.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students present their trip to the class.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and evaluate each other’s presentations.
  • Encourages creativity and teamwork as students work together to plan their trip and create their advertisement.

Job Interview Role-Plays: Preparing for the Real World

Job Interview Role-Plays are a valuable activity for more advanced ESL students. They provide an opportunity to practice formal language, answer common interview questions, and discuss career-related topics.

Materials Needed: You’ll need role-play cards for this activity. These should include a job description and a list of common interview questions.

  • Divide the class into pairs and give each a role-play card. One student will be the interviewer and the other will be the job applicant.
  • Students prepare for their roles, with the applicant thinking about how to answer the interview questions and the interviewer thinking about what they’re looking for in a candidate.
  • Students then act out their role-play. After each role-play, facilitate a class discussion about the interview, the language used, and how to prepare for a job interview in English.

Benefits of the Activity: Job Interview Role-Plays offer several benefits for ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a practical context for students to practice formal language and job interview skills.
  • Enhance students’ understanding of job interviews and career-related topics.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students act out different roles.
  • Foster active listening skills as students respond to each other in the role-play.
  • Prepare students for real-world situations, such as job interviews in English.

Story Cubes: Narrative Skills for Young Learners

Story Cubes are a fun and creative way for young learners to practice their narrative skills. In this activity, students roll dice with pictures on each face and then create a story based on the pictures that come up.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a set of story cubes for this activity. These are dice with different pictures on each face. If you don’t have story cubes, you can make your own with regular dice and a list of pictures corresponding to each number.

  • One student rolls the story cubes and looks at the pictures that come up.
  • The student then creates a story that includes all of the pictures. They can make the story as imaginative and creative as they like.
  • The game continues with different students rolling the cubes and telling their stories.

Benefits of the Activity: Story Cubes offer several benefits for young ESL learners. They:

  • Provide a fun and creative way for students to practice their narrative skills.
  • Enhance creativity and imagination as students create their own stories.
  • Build confidence in speaking as students tell their stories to the class.
  • Foster active listening skills as students listen to and respond to each other’s stories.

Discussion Circles: The Power of Group Discussion

Podcast creation: modern learning for adult learners.

Creating a podcast is a modern and engaging way for adult learners to practice their English skills. In this activity, students work in pairs or small groups to create a podcast episode on a topic of their choice.

Materials Needed: Students will need a recording device for this activity. This could be a smartphone, a computer with a microphone, or a dedicated audio recorder. They’ll also need a topic for their podcast episode.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and assign each a topic for their podcast episode. The topic should be something they’re interested in and can research.
  • Students research their topic and plan their podcast episode. They should think about what points they want to make, who will say what, and how to engage their listeners.
  • Students then record their podcast episode. They can do this in one take or edit together multiple takes for a more polished result.
  • Once the podcasts are complete, have a listening party where you play each podcast and discuss them as a class.

Benefits of the Activity: Creating a podcast offers several benefits for adult ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a modern and engaging context for students to practice their English skills.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students record their podcast episodes.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s podcasts.
  • Encourages digital literacy skills as students record and edit their podcasts.

Picture Story Activity: Sequential Storytelling

The Picture Story activity is a fun and creative way for students to practice their narrative skills and sequential language. In this activity, students arrange pictures to create a story and then tell the story to the class.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a set of pictures for this activity. The pictures should be able to be arranged in different ways to create different stories.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and give each a set of pictures.
  • Students arrange the pictures to create a story. They should think about the sequence of events, the characters, and the plot.
  • Students then tell their story to the class, using the pictures as a guide.
  • After each story, facilitate a class discussion about the story and the language used.

Benefits of the Activity: The Picture Story activity offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and creative way for students to practice their narrative skills and sequential language.
  • Enhances creativity and imagination as students create their own stories.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students tell their stories to the class.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and respond to each other’s stories.

Surveys: Data Collection and Discussion

Conducting surveys is a practical way for students to practice their question-asking and data-interpretation skills. In this activity, students create a survey, collect data from their classmates, and then discuss the results.

Materials Needed: Students will need paper and pens for this activity. They might also need resources to research their survey topic.

  • Divide the class into pairs or small groups and assign each a survey topic. The topic should be something they can collect data on from their classmates.
  • Students create a survey with a variety of question types, such as yes/no questions, multiple-choice questions, and open-ended questions.
  • Students then conduct their survey, asking their classmates the questions and recording their answers.
  • Once the surveys are complete, students analyze the data and present their findings to the class.

Benefits of the Activity: Conducting surveys offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice their question-asking and data-interpretation skills.
  • Enhances research and analytical skills.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students conduct their surveys and present their findings.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students respond to the survey questions and listen to the presentations.

Movie Reviews: Critical Thinking in Action

Writing and discussing movie reviews is a fun way for students to practice their critical thinking and persuasive language skills. In this activity, students watch a movie, write a review, and then discuss their reviews in class.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a movie for this activity. Choose a movie that is appropriate for your students’ proficiency level and interests. Students will also need paper and pens to write their reviews.

  • Assign a movie for students to watch before the class. This could be for homework or you could watch the movie together in class if time allows.
  • After watching the movie, students write a review. They should include a summary of the movie, their opinion of it, and reasons to support their opinion.
  • In class, students share their reviews and discuss the movie. Facilitate a discussion about the different opinions and the language used in the reviews.
  • You can use conversation questions to facilitate the discussions.

Benefits of the Activity: Writing and discussing movie reviews offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun context for students to practice their critical thinking and persuasive language skills.
  • Enhances writing skills as students write their reviews.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students share their reviews and discuss the movie.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and respond to each other’s reviews.

I Spy: Observation and Description

I Spy is a classic game that can be adapted for the ESL classroom to practice observation and descriptive language. In this activity, one student describes something they can see, and the other students guess what it is.

Materials Needed: This activity doesn’t require any specific materials. You can play it in the classroom using the objects and people that are present.

  • One student chooses something in the room and says “I spy with my little eye something that…” and then gives a description. The description could be about the color, size, shape, or function of the object.
  • The other students take turns guessing what the object is. The student who guesses correctly gets to describe the next object.

Benefits of the Activity: I Spy offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their observation and descriptive language skills.
  • Enhances vocabulary as students describe and guess different objects.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students describe objects and guess what others are describing.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to the descriptions and guesses.

Mock Trial Activity: Legal Language in Practice

A Mock Trial is a dynamic activity for more advanced ESL students to practice legal language and persuasive speaking. In this activity, students take on the roles of lawyers, witnesses, and jurors in a simulated trial.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a case for the trial. This could be a real case, a fictional case, or a simplified version of a complex case. You’ll also need role cards with character descriptions and information about the case.

  • Divide the class into roles and give each student a role card. The roles could include lawyers, witnesses, jurors, and a judge.
  • Students prepare for the trial, with the lawyers preparing their arguments and questions, the witnesses preparing their testimonies, and the jurors preparing to listen and make a decision.
  • Conduct the trial, with the lawyers presenting their cases, the witnesses giving their testimonies, and the jurors listening and making a decision.
  • After the trial, facilitate a class discussion about the trial, the language used, and the legal concepts involved.

Benefits of the Activity: A Mock Trial offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice legal language and persuasive speaking.
  • Enhances students’ understanding of legal concepts and courtroom procedures.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students take on different roles.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students respond to each other in the trial.
  • Encourages critical thinking as students prepare their roles and make decisions during the trial.

Describing a Process: Sequential Language Practice

Describing a Process is a useful activity for students to practice sequential language and technical vocabulary. In this activity, students describe a process, such as cooking a recipe, assembling a piece of furniture, or conducting a science experiment.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a process for students to describe. This could be a recipe, assembly instructions, a science experiment procedure, or any other process that involves a sequence of steps.

  • Assign a process for students to describe. This could be for homework or you could describe the process together in class.
  • Students describe the process, using sequential language and the appropriate technical vocabulary. They should try to make their description as clear and detailed as possible.
  • After the descriptions are complete, facilitate a class discussion about the process, the language used, and any difficulties or challenges in describing the process.

Benefits of the Activity: Describing a Process offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a practical context for students to practice sequential language and technical vocabulary.
  • Enhances students’ understanding of process and procedure.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students describe a process in detail.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and discuss the process descriptions.

Board Games: Learning through Play in ESL

Board Games are a fun and interactive way for students to practice English in a relaxed setting. In this activity, students play a board game, using English to discuss the game, make decisions, and interact with each other.

Materials Needed: You’ll need a board game for this activity. Choose a game that involves some level of language use, such as Scrabble, Pictionary, or a trivia game.

  • Divide the class into small groups and give each a board game.
  • Students play the game, using English to discuss the game, make decisions, and interact with each other.
  • After the game, facilitate a class discussion about the game, the language used, and any new vocabulary or phrases that were learned.

Benefits of the Activity: Playing Board Games offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a fun and relaxed context for students to practice English.
  • Enhances a variety of language skills, depending on the game.
  • Encourages cooperative learning as students play together.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students interact in a low-pressure setting.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students respond to each other during the game.

Cultural Exchange: Broadening Horizons in ESL

Activity Description: The Cultural Exchange activity is a fantastic way for students to learn about different cultures and practice their speaking skills. In this activity, students research a specific culture and present their findings to the class. This could be their own culture, the culture of an English-speaking country, or any other culture that interests them.

Materials Needed: Students will need resources to research their chosen culture. This could be books, internet access, or even interviews with people from that culture.

  • Assign each student (or pair/group of students) a culture to research. This could be assigned by you, or students could choose their own.
  • Students research their chosen culture, focusing on aspects such as traditions, customs, food, language, history, and more.
  • Students prepare a presentation about their chosen culture. This could be a spoken presentation, a poster, a slideshow, or even a demonstration of a cultural activity.
  • Students present their findings to the class. Encourage the class to ask questions and engage in a discussion about each culture.

Benefits of the Activity: The Cultural Exchange activity offers several benefits for ESL learners. It:

  • Provides a meaningful context for students to practice their research and speaking skills.
  • Enhances students’ global awareness and understanding of different cultures.
  • Builds confidence in speaking as students present their findings to the class.
  • Fosters active listening skills as students listen to and discuss each other’s presentations.
  • Encourages respect for diversity and an appreciation for different cultures.

Conclusion: Choosing the Right ESL Speaking Activities for Your ESL Class

Choosing the right ESL speaking activities for your ESL class can make a big difference in your students’ engagement and progress. Consider your students’ proficiency level, interests, and learning goals when choosing activities. Remember that variety is key – a mix of quiet and noisy activities, individual and group work, and different types of language practice will keep your classes interesting and effective. Happy teaching!

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10 entertaining homework ideas for online English Language Learners

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Did hearing the words, “do your homework,” when you were a child excite you? 

For most of us, the word homework doesn’t conjure up exciting or fun memories. 

Homework was likely one of the last things you wanted to do as a student!

However, what if you could make homework fun for students? What if homework was entertaining? 

In this article, we share some entertaining homework ideas for English language learners to help them improve their English while having fun!

You might be familiar with lots of ESL games and activities for your students , but assigning the right homework can feel overwhelming. 

This is particularly true if you don’t want to burden your students with a tremendous amount of information. 

Have you ever thought about combining games with homework? 

There are many alternative ways to create memorable lessons, such as incorporating karaoke songs to learn English. 

Here are 10 fun and entertaining homework ideas for your ESL students:

  • Cafe hopper
  • Tiktok star
  • Let’s go to the movies
  • Hello Mr. Teacher
  • Interview a stranger
  • Shine like a Karaoke star
  • Expert on the loose
  • 24 hour challenge
  • It’s a wrap!
  • Masterchef in the making

1. Cafe hopper

Most people love checking out cafes and this is an easy homework task to assign to your students.  

Have your students visit a variety of cafes as part of their homework. 

Then, consider what they could do for homework in a cafe of their choice.

Here are some fun ideas for turning cafe-hopping into homework:

  • Practice ordering in English off of the menu.
  • Take a photo of the cafe’s and share the differences and similarities with you in class.
  • Speak to a stranger in each cafe in English and ask them some interesting questions about their life.
  • Interview the barista about their favorite kind of coffee or beverage.

This is a stress-free homework idea that your students will love, especially if they are coffee or tea lovers!

2. TikTok star

Tiktok is a fun social media application where you can watch videos and songs from creators. You can also watch creators lip-synching to catchy tunes.

Show some fun examples in your class of some famous TikTok songs being lip-synched to by others and practice doing one together.

  • For homework, have them choose their favorite song on TikTok.
  • They can lip-synch to the song and download the song to their camera album without having to actually post it to TikTok.
  • Have them share their creation with you in the next class!

Depending on the age and location of your student, TikTok might not be an option for them. If you are teaching older students or adults , then it might be easier for them to use social media for this homework assignment rather than young children.

If they are too young to use the app, have them find an online video of their favorite song and ask a parent to record them singing!

3. Let’s go to the movies

Going to the movies doesn’t sound like homework, does it? Well, as you might already be discovering, homework doesn’t have to be conventional!

Find some interesting movies that are playing in your students’ area or ask them to watch a movie of their choice in English. 

Tell them that their homework is going to be based on the movie they watch.

Here are some ideas for making going to the movies part of their homework:

  • Have them write a summary of the movie or their favorite part.
  • Tell them that they have to give you a movie review in your next class.
  • Have them act out their favorite part of the movie with a sibling or family member and record it (in English of course!).
  • Ask them to make a poster advertising the movie with captions, titles and text to accompany any drawings.

If you are struggling to find movies they can go and watch in the cinema, you can always use these ESL movies and TV shows as a resource. 

Students can also watch movies from the comforts of their homes. 

4. Hello Mr. Teacher!

Students love playing the role of the teacher! 

This can work for in-person or online ESL classes.  

Tell them that as part of the next classroom activity, the first 5 – 10 minutes will be their time to shine as the teacher!

For homework, ask them to:

  • Think of one topic that they know a lot about (This could be a sport, musical instrument, game, topic, etc…).
  • Have them prepare 5 important things that someone needs to know about their topic.
  • Tell them that in their next class they will be the teacher and share their knowledge! (They can even give you homework!).

Have fun with this homework idea and role-play the student where you ask them questions after they finish. 

Your students will love this one!

5. Interview a stranger

This one might need some parent support and guidance if you are teaching children, but having them interview someone is an entertaining homework idea for English language learners.

  • It encourages their own voice as they come up with ideas.
  • It helps with writing skills as they write out their questions.
  • Interviewing encourages conversation and role playing which is a fun way to learn English.

You could have your younger students interview a family member and ask questions related to that family member’s childhood. 

Here are some sample questions you could help your students form:

  • What kind of things did you like to do when you were my age?
  • What was your favorite thing about school?
  • What types of sports did you play when you were young?
  • Tell me about what life was like when you were a child.

Have them choose and write out 5-10 questions and come back to class to report on their findings!

6. Shine like a Karaoke star

Who doesn’t like a bit of karaoke? Imagine….singing your heart out to “I love rock n roll” in the privacy of your own home!

You don’t need to go to a karaoke place to actually sing karaoke songs. There are lots of great karaoke songs available online to learn English with your students.

YouTube is a great place to start, just by searching for your favorite song + “karaoke lyrics” in the search bar.

In class, help your student(s) choose a song and task them with finding the online karaoke lyrics to sing along.

Have them sing this for homework! You could even ask a parent to help them record it if they are comfortable with that.

Here are some fun and popular karaoke songs online to learn English:

  • “I Will Survive” with Gloria Gaynor
  • “Livin’ on a Prayer” with Bon Jovi
  • “Summer Nights” with John Travolta and Olivia Newton John
  • “Don’t Stop Believin’” with Journey

7. Expert on the loose

There is an expert in all of us, including your students!

In this fun and entertaining homework idea, have your student share their expertise on something!

To add a different dimension to the homework idea, “Hello Mr. Teacher,” task your students to dress up as the expert and make a short speech on their topic of choice.

Here are some examples:

  • Harry Potter
  • Michael Jordan (to talk about basketball)
  • Favorite sports athlete
  • Insect scientist
  • Astronaut (if your student knows a lot about space)
  • Presidential candidate
  • Pilot (for students who know a lot about countries)

Even if they are not an expert on the topic, part of the homework assignment could be to do some research and learn more about their chosen field.

You could even ask them to dress up and come to class in the role, ready to share their knowledge with you! 

8. 24 hour English challenge

This one is self-explanatory and incredibly fun!

Set a challenge for your student to only speak in English for 24 hours. 

This means that you might need to get parents involved with the homework assignment, so that they can help out.

The idea is that they have to speak only in English (as much as is possible given their situation) when interacting with family, friends and at school.

Your students might already be immersed in English environments, but, oftentimes, they are speaking their native language at home with family and friends.

Having your students force themselves to only speak in English is challenging and a great way to encourage English outside the classroom.

9. It’s a wrap!

Lots of students love to rap! Rap music is poetic and encourages a lot of ESL language skills that we want to build in our students.

This is an activity that you can model with your students in class and assign it for homework for them to create their own rap.

Again, they can come back to class and rap their new song to you! It might, however, work better with older students who have a good base level of English, to begin with.

Here are some fun homework assignments incorporating rap:

  • Create their own rap if they are the creative type
  • Find a well known rap online and practice it to present in class
  • Assign your students to find a rap online that they sing and record with their friends

10. Masterchef extraordinaire

For the food lovers, creating a homework assignment that includes cooking can be really fun.

Most kids love the idea of cooking, especially if it centers around cooking their favorite food!

When considering this as a homework idea, consider these possible assignments:

  • Create and write out a recipe for a unique culinary dish.
  • Make a video about the cooking experience.
  • Record a tutorial of how to cook something.
  • Turn it into a competition if you have multiple students.

Plus, this works with physical and online classrooms. 

Of course, if you have a physical classroom with multiple students, this could be a really fun in-class experience with some homework assignments to accompany it.

Who doesn’t love a food-related assignment? 

If you choose Masterchef extraordinaire, allow your students to share the food they make with the class and encourage lots of conversations in English.

Homework doesn’t have to be boring!

As you can see, homework doesn’t have to be boring! 

Most of your ESL students have a lot to do even outside class, and that’s why assigning homework that doesn’t feel like homework is ideal!

This is an opportunity to get creative, creating excitement for your students to learn English.

If you use some of the homework ideas mentioned here, make sure you document the experience and continue to discover new activities that bring laughter and joy to the classroom. 

And when you are applying to online teaching jobs , be sure to share how you plan to creatively incorporate class assignments and homework for your students!

Enjoy the process and make learning an enjoyable experience for everyone. 

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Wonderful World English

Homework for ESL Students – 10 Ideas for Teachers

David De' Ath

Meet  David De’ Ath , founder, editor, and writer at Wonderful World English. With his extensive background as an English teacher, David provides valuable insights and practical tips on ESL for students and teachers alike.

Learning English as a Second Language (ESL) is an enriching venture and offers students the ability to access global opportunities.

Homework in ESL is crucial, serving as a bridge between classroom theory and practical language use.

It’s essential for reinforcing learned concepts and enhancing general language proficiency.

To make this learning journey both effective and enjoyable, it’s important to craft homework tasks that are engaging and tailored to diverse learning styles.

This approach helps to maintain students’ interest and motivation, which are key to successful language acquisition.

These ESL homework ideas are designed to enhance language learning and engage students both in and out of the classroom: Daily journaling, vocabulary flashcards, reading comprehension, listening to podcasts/songs, video diaries, role-play scenarios, grammar worksheets, online games, book club discussions, and a pen pal program.

I am an experienced ESL teacher, and I can attest first-hand to the importance of self-study, homework, and review.

Our carefully selected ten homework ideas aim to transform routine learning into an exciting adventure.

These activities are more than just assignments; they’re interactive experiences designed to deepen students’ understanding of English.

From creative writing to practical exercises, these tasks are intended to make learning English a dynamic and enjoyable process, paving the way for a richer, more confident use of the language.

speaking homework esl

Homework Ideas for ESL Students

ESL students need more than just traditional classroom lessons.

Homework is a vital part of their language development and serves as a bridge between acquired knowledge and practical application.

The following homework ideas are designed to captivate students’ interest, deepen their understanding, and enhance their fluency in English in the classroom and real-life situations.

Let’s dive into these creative and effective homework strategies that promise a richer, more interactive language learning experience:

1. Daily Journaling

This is a great idea to engage students by embracing the habit of maintaining a daily journal.

Writing about their daily experiences, emotions, thoughts, or selected topics can sharpen their writing skills while learning to articulate their feelings and ideas in English.

This journaling process serves a dual purpose: it strengthens their grasp of the language and provides a personal space for self-expression.

As they regularly engage with this practice, English becomes an integral part of their daily routine and will facilitate a more natural and fluent use of the language in their everyday lives.

This activity bolsters their linguistic abilities and fosters a deeper connection with English as a medium of personal reflection and expression.

Writing is a huge aspect of mastering a language.

For a guide on how to improve writing skills for yourself or your students, click the link below!

Related Article: How to Sharpen Writing Skills – Full Guide

2. Making Flashcards

Students can develop their vocabulary skills through the classic and effective method of creating flashcards.

This exercise involves students writing down new words and their meanings on individual cards.

They can add illustrations or use words in sentences to make the learning process more engaging and impactful.

This visual and contextual approach helps better retain and understand new vocabulary.

By regularly reviewing these flashcards, students can gradually build a robust vocabulary base, which is essential for fluency in English.

This method will reinforce their word knowledge and encourage active engagement with the language, making vocabulary learning a more interactive and enjoyable experience.

Flashcards are suitable for students of all ages and can be fun.

For some great insights on effectively teaching ESL students vocabulary, the guide below is for you!

Related Article: How to Teach Vocabulary to ESL Students – The Guide

speaking homework esl

3. Reading Comprehension Exercises

Immerse more advanced students in the world of English reading by assigning short stories or articles complemented by comprehension questions.

This exercise is pivotal in enhancing their reading skills and deepening their understanding of various contexts in English.

Students encounter different writing styles, vocabularies, and themes by engaging with diverse texts, enriching their language experience.

The follow-up questions serve to test their understanding and encourage critical thinking about the content.

This approach bolsters their ability to comprehend English texts and stimulates their analytical skills, making them more adept at interpreting and engaging with the language in its written form.

Such reading exercises are fundamental in helping students gain confidence and proficiency in navigating English literature and media.

4. Podcasts and Songs

Teachers can offer listening exercises in their curriculums by using English podcasts and songs.

This method exposes students to a variety of accents, speaking speeds, and vocabulary in a natural context.

After listening, students can engage in activities like writing summaries or answering questions about what they heard.

These post-listening tasks are crucial for enhancing their comprehension and retention.

This approach is great at improving listening skills while making the learning process more enjoyable and relatable.

By regularly interacting with authentic English content, students develop a better ear for the language and learn to appreciate its rhythm and nuances in different forms of media.

This not only aids in language acquisition but also connects them culturally to the English-speaking world.

Check out the guide below for a list of the BEST English podcasts!

Related Article: Best Podcasts to Learn the English Language in 2024 (Top 10)

speaking homework esl

5. Video Diaries

This one encourages students to create short video diaries as a regular assignment.

This task provides them with a platform to practice speaking about a variety of topics in English.

Whether they choose to talk about their daily life, share opinions on current events, or discuss their hobbies, these video diaries offer a unique opportunity for students to engage actively with the language.

This activity not only improves their spoken English skills but also significantly boosts their confidence in using the language.

It helps them to overcome any hesitation or fear of speaking by providing a safe, personal space to express themselves.

The process of recording and watching their own videos can also be a powerful tool for self-evaluation and progress tracking.

This innovative approach to language learning empowers students to become more fluent and self-assured English speakers.

6. Role-play in Real-world Scenarios

Ask your students to prepare role-plays that mimic real-world scenarios, such as shopping, ordering food, or making appointments.

This practical approach to learning takes them beyond the confines of traditional classroom exercises and immerses them in everyday situations. T

Through role-playing, students get to practice conversational English in a structured yet dynamic context.

It allows them to apply their language skills in practical situations, enhancing their ability to communicate effectively in real-life settings.

This method is particularly effective in familiarizing them with common phrases and vocabulary used in daily interactions.

Additionally, role-playing can be a fun and interactive way to learn, helping to reduce the anxiety often associated with speaking a new language.

By engaging in these simulated experiences, students gain confidence and fluency, which are crucial for their overall language development.

speaking homework esl

7. Grammar Worksheets

This is a classic form of homework for ESL students, to offer them worksheets that concentrate on specific grammar points, such as verb tenses, sentence structure, or prepositions.

Regular practice with these worksheets is instrumental in solidifying their understanding of English grammar.

This methodical approach allows students to focus on one aspect of grammar at a time, ensuring a thorough grasp of each concept.

Such targeted exercises help correct common mistakes and deepen their comprehension of the language’s structure.

By consistently working through these grammar worksheets, students build a strong grammatical foundation, which is vital for effective English communication.

This foundational knowledge enhances their writing and speaking skills and boosts their confidence in correctly using the language in various contexts.

For some tips on how to teach grammar to ESL students, we’ve put together a guide to help teachers everywhere!

Related Article: How to Teach Grammar to ESL Students – Teacher’s Guide

8. Online Games

Motivate your students to engage with educational language games available online.

These games offer a fun, interactive way to learn and practice English.

Students can improve various language skills through game-based learning, including vocabulary, grammar, reading, and even listening comprehension.

The interactive nature of these games makes the learning process more enjoyable and less intimidating, especially for younger learners or beginners.

As students play, they receive immediate feedback on their performance, which helps reinforce correct usage and understanding.

This approach enhances their language skills and keeps them motivated and engaged in their learning.

Online language games provide a dynamic and enjoyable way to supplement traditional learning methods, making language practice an activity that students can look forward to.

For some ideas of classroom games, both traditional and digital, check out the guide below!

Related Article: Fun Classroom Games to Play – Teacher’s Guide

speaking homework esl

9. Book Club

Another great idea is to start a book club in your class, where students can read and discuss a common book.

This collaborative activity enhances their reading skills and promotes critical thinking and group discussion skills in English.

Choosing books that are appropriate for their language level, the book club encourages students to dive into stories and themes, expanding their vocabulary and comprehension.

Discussing the book with their peers allows them to share perspectives, articulate their thoughts, and engage in meaningful conversations in English.

This interactive and social approach to learning also builds a sense of community among the students, making English learning a shared and enjoyable experience.

The book club thus becomes a platform for growth, not just in language proficiency but also in cognitive and social skills.

10. Pen Pal Program

The tenth great homework idea for ESL students is to start a pen pal program with English-speaking individuals from different parts of the world.

This initiative provides a unique opportunity for students to engage in regular written communication with native English speakers.

Through exchanging letters or emails, students practice their writing skills in a real-world context, learning to express their thoughts and ideas clearly in English.

This regular interaction not only improves their language proficiency but also offers valuable insights into different cultures and lifestyles, enhancing their cultural understanding and global awareness.

The pen pal program is more than just a language exercise; it’s a bridge that connects students across cultures, promoting international friendships and broadening their perspectives.

This kind of cultural exchange can be a highly rewarding and motivating experience, encouraging students to apply their language skills in meaningful and authentic interactions.

You can reach out to other teachers on platforms like LinkedIn and see if they would be willing to start a pen pal initiative for both them and your students.

speaking homework esl

The homework ideas presented for ESL students transcend the traditional concept of assignments.

They are designed as interactive learning experiences that not only build language skills but do so in a way that is practical, enjoyable, and highly effective.

Integrating these varied activities into the ESL curriculum allows teachers to cultivate a dynamic and nurturing learning environment.

Such an approach encourages students to actively engage with the English language, not just within the confines of the classroom but in their everyday lives as well.

Promoting this kind of immersive learning experience makes students more likely to develop a lasting proficiency and a genuine appreciation for the language.

These activities, therefore, play a crucial role in shaping confident, competent English speakers who are prepared to navigate the global landscape.

We hope you find value in this article; let us know if you require any assistance.

Have a wonderful day!

Image Attribution: All images licensed via canva.com

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speaking homework esl

speaking homework esl

15 Speaking Projects And Activities For ESL Students

I don’t think I am sticking my neck out too much by saying that most ESL students enjoy speaking activities more than typical reading, writing and listening activities. Tending to be more dynamic, true to life and fun, a good speaking activity can really enhance an ESL student’s fluency and confidence.

Here, I am going to offer you a series of ESL speaking projects that you can adapt and use for your ESL students. Let’s go:

Infomercial Activities

This is one of my favorite speaking projects by far. Show students some typical adverts from a shopping channel; I like to show some of the funnier products just for giggles and to encourage students minds to wander, take a look at this compilation to see what I mean.

Next, I ask students usually in pairs to come up with their own completely original product to sell on an infomercial. If students struggle to come up with a completely new product you can suggest they add a new twist to arnold product, or make a new product based on a combination of two or more others.

For example, in the past I have had: microwave televisions, hair dryers that double as vacuum cleaners and laptops that double as portable stoves.

I tend to also do a language lesson based around the language of selling and persuasion so that when students make their infomercial they will send realistic and they often like to know some of the sales phrases, tactics and strategies that are used in real life.

Just for fun, you can tell students that they have a certain amount of money to spend and after they have seen all the infomercials they get to spend it. Sales can be recorded and you can see which idea/pair has made the most money and are the winner!

Presentations

Give students a presentation of a topic of your choosing, perhaps your own hobby and model the format and language that you want the students to use.

I tend to share slides with the student with the title of each slide already inserted. Students then have to fill the space with suitable information for that slide.

So, for example, if I wanted my students to present their own hobbies then I would probably have six slides titled with questions:

What is my favorite hobby? Why did I start this hobby? What have I achieved doing this hobby? Who do I do this hobby with? What will I do next in this hobby? Other interesting info about my hobby.

Students then fill the slides full of pictures that relate to the question and then they talk about these to the group and answer questions.

Some students always want to write out a script for a presentation which I let them do on the understanding that they can’t actually read it when they present. I allow them to write it out just so they can build up some confidence in what they are going to say and check the language accuracy of it. 

I do usually place sentence starters and linking words on posters behind the audience so that the presenter always has some support if needs be.

Of course, this could also be done as a recorded video task. I sometimes ask students to record a voice over on top of the slides. This can then be converted into a video format for sharing later.

A few other simple presentation topic titles for ESL students that could be used are: My Best Friend, Who Am I?, My Pets, My Future Career, My Family, The Last Celebration I want to, Why I am a fan of __________ (insert name of whatever they are a fan of).

At this point you might also want to read one of my popular article about how to make your students speak English , here

Hot Seat ing

Become an expert – As it sounds. Students spent a certain amount of time researching a topic that either they choose or that is given to them. They are then to become that character and the rest of the group has to ask them questions to find out as much as they can about them in a set amount of time.

You can award points for correct questions being asked and for grammatically correct sentences in response. Personally I like to do this at the beginning of a new topic and direct students to research different famous people.

For example, if we are going to be covering the topic of Travel as in the IGCSE ESL then I have students research characters, such as: Dr Livingstone, Joe Simpson, Ernest Shackleton, Amelia Earhart, Ranulf Fiennes, and so on. 

I often have students create a mini glossary for their characters as well which other students can refer to as they are quizzing the character.  

This activity is best for intermediate level and above students and even then you may need to provide texts at a suitable level for students to be able to access, otherwise students end up on Wikipedia reading very difficult text.

You can have the group make notes and write summaries of each character for homework if you also wish to work on summary writing skills.

Recommended reading: 15 Research Projects For ESL Students

The Detective Game

For this activity you make up a crime that occurred in a given location, the more gruesome the better and if you can personalise it to your location and environment more the better.

Divide the group into smaller groups of three or four people and then ask them to create their alibis for the morning, afternoon, or evening in question. These people are the suspects.

One group, however, is assigned as being the investigators and they individually quiz different suspects one to one to try and find inconsistencies in their group’s stories. This forces each group to consider exactly what they were doing, where and with whom very carefully and in great detail. 

After interviewing as many members of each group and making notes about inconsistencies between group members the investigators then confer with each other to decide upon which group’ alibi is the most inconsistent. This group are then sent to jail.

Whilst the investigators are discussing this, the suspects discuss which investigator was the best at questioning them and finding out the inconsistencies. The suspects will then announce who this person is, and they earn a promotion. Finally, the investigators announce the losing group which will go to prison.

This ‘game’ has got real legs and could go in so many different directions, so don’t be afraid to improvise and have fun with this one.  

Drama Activities

Acting out a chapter of a book. Pretty much as it sounds. Read through a chapter of a book with students or have them read it for homework before letting groups act out the chapter, or a scene from it.

This works well even if they all act out the same scene as each group will learn from the last and the acting/performance and language should get increasingly better throughout. Alternatively arrange it so that each group acts out the following scene to the last group and so the full story is told.

Storyboard and act out the student’s own story. Rather than act out a book, you could have students plan out a story, or at least part of a story on a storyboard. This can give a greater sense of ownership, achievement and ‘buy in’ from the students.

What happened next. Read the opening of a book and as a ‘cliffhanger is reached’ pause and have students work together to act out the ending of the story or the next scene at least.

This also works well with videos from YouTube, crime videos work well as do Walt Disney cartoons – even with adult learners for some reason!

You might also be interested in reading my helpful article on how to get your students speaking fluently , here.

Mind Map ping

Vocabulary relationships. Engage students in a subject which contains lots of relationships of cause and effect. Basically, you need to pick a topic and analyse what the different factors were that affected the main decision or characters involved.

In the centre of your mind map place the decision or a character that was made and then arrange influencing factors around this. 

The larger the circle each factor is in and the closer it is to the centre of the paper the stronger the influence is. Students then need to explain their mind map and the relationships to the group. Others can question and agree/ disagree with them. 

Topics can range from serious issues from history through to celebrity scandals, or even plots in a movie, such as, why did celebrity couple X and Y get divorced, or why did actor x decide to y in the movie xyz. Obviously, you can let the students self select these issues for greater interest. 

Backs To The Board

A timeless classic not so much a speaking project but this can be developed into a full lesson’s worth of speaking and it works for groups of all sizes. It is excellent for reviewing vocabulary at the end of a project or to see what students know at the beginning of a topic.

Simply split the group into teams of no more than five and have one member of the group come to the front and sit with their back to the board.

The other members of the group form a ‘u’ shape around the person, or, rather than being sat literally against the board groups can be sat at tables with just one student having their back to the board. 

All you then need to do is to write a word on the board and the students facing the board have to get the person not facing the board to say the word without literally telling them the word. They should be encouraged to use definitions, synonyms and examples of the word where possible. 

Depending on numbers, students can just shout out when they think they have the answer, or with large groups I make the students raise their hand if they think they have the answer.

The danger with debates is that to the teacher they may seem boring, or at least they do to me but have to remind myself that just because I have done the debates dozens of times, they haven’t and even the most overdone/boring sounding debates may go down like fireworks with some groups.

With that in mind here are a few of the more traditional/boring debates for your students to get their teeth into:

Which is better, country life or city life?

Should animal testing be allowed?

Should school uniforms be gotten rid of

Are cats better than dogs?

Should women be paid as much as men?

Online learning is better than classroom learning

Does money equal success in life?

I also like to see if there is something going on in the students view of the world that is worth debating. For example, in Thailand the debate over whether Korean pop music is better than Thai pop music is a popular one. 

I have had colleagues dive into debates about serious political topics with higher level students which have worked really well.

However, some topics are just too hot to handle and you don’t know who you are upsetting so be careful what topics you do debate, you never know who is listening, or who is going to offense at any of your personal views that you may let slip!

Here is a good resource for more ESL debate ideas .

Book And Movie Review s

This is pretty much as it sounds. I like to set a reading task for students over a holiday break and when they return they have to submit a video review of the book or movie they watched/read. 

I usually show them a good movie review for ideas and ask them to follow the same format. Something like this review of Kung Fu Panda . This goes along the lines of: background information, main characters, plot explanation, favorite moments, final recommendation.

I’ve also done this with higher level groups for documentaries but with enough support and speaking frames pre intermediate students can engage well with this activity.

Conversation Question s

Don’t underestimate the value of pure lists of conversation questions. Students are often happy to just ‘have a chat’ and use the English that they do know.

It is great for their confidence and fluency, as well as requiring zero lesson prep, which is always a nice thing. Just be sure to rotate speaking partners to avoid students getting bored with the same partners and used to different accents.

Sometimes, depending on ability and interest levels I will teach three or four idioms at the beginning of the lesson and set the task of trying to naturally drop them into conversation later on.

There are lot of good sources of conversation questions, here are a couple: eslconversationquestions.com and esldiscussions.com .

ESL Exam Preparation Material

Some students are hugely motivated by doing well in exams such as the IELTS test, and IGCSE ESL speaking tests. Exam boards for tests such as these produce a plethora of practise material that is often available for free online and ready to be use.

My students particularly enjoy the IELTS speaking part 2 task where they are required to speak about a given topic and are given three bullet points to talk about. They are given one minute to prepare their ideas before they have to speak on their own for two minutes. 

If you think your students might enjoy this then here are some good sources of free IELTS style questions: IELTS IDP and ielts-exam.net , and for IGCSE ESL speaking questions check out the role play paper here.

The added bonus of these activities is that there is always a grading criteria ready to be used so you can grade students and give them real reasons why they scored a certain level and what they need to do to score higher in the future.

Here are the IELTS speaking criteria for example which clearly spells out what is expected of students at different levels.

Finger Puppet Shows

One really good way to get shy students speaking I have found to introduce sock puppets. As silly as it sounds, there is something about using a puppet that takes away the pressure on the speaker and frees them up to speak.

Whether it is the element of hilarity of  speaking sock or the fact that people are generally looking at the sock rather than the person it seems to work well.

Depending on the ability level I will either give pairs of students scripts to act out with puppets. They can introduce their own props as well to make it even more funny. Alternatively, I will do this as an improv.

I will read out a situation, for example, one of you has lost their passport at the airport. Then the students have to act out this scenes as best as they can.

Switch partners and introduce more situations and watch the energy level of the room pick up!

By the end of the lesson you may well notice previously shy students speaking confidently with other students having been drawn into the magic of sock puppets! A great little speaking project.

Role Plays With Idioms

I use this lesson pattern quite regularly and it works well. I start off with student matching idioms to meanings and then to example sentences with the idioms missing.

After going through these answers and doing any teaching necessary to aid understanding I will then hand out a dialogue but with all the sentences jumbled up.

Students then have to unjumble the conversation which contains one or more of the idioms being used in a natural way. Next, they read the dialogue through taking different roles each and then doing the dialogue again without looking at the words.

Next, students are given the task of creating their own dialogues using at least one of the idioms in an appropriate way. Students write out the dialogues, rehearse them and then act them out for the group.

You can also do this with phrasal verbs but either way it works out well and the routine can be used again when you are a bit short of material or are having a hangover day!

Barrier Activities

One favourite of mine that never fails to stimulate plenty of language use is to simply create your own barrier exercise. I like to get a nice chunky newspaper article related to what we are learning and then go through each paragraph and remove key details, such as: names, dates, place names, times, location etcetera…

I create two versions of this, the first one will have words missing from odd number paragraphs and the second copy will have words missing from even number paragraphs.

This prevents it from becoming confusing and make sure to keep one master version with no details missing and if you have time highlight the missing words in red so it is easy for students to check later.

Once the missing word copies are ready you can divide the class into two halves distributing sheet A to one half and sheet B to the other half. Allow them to work in groups at this point to work out what questions they need to ask the other half of the group in order to get the missing details filled in.

If you think this will be too difficult for them you can provide the questions in a jumbled up format so they have to rearrange them to make the questions,, or even give them the questions but they have to work out the order in which to ask them to correspond to the paragraph order.

After this preparation period students can then pair up with someone from the opposite half of the group to take turns asking and answering each other’s questions.

Make sure that students do not show each other their articles and simply just sit and copy the answers, clearly this simply defeats the whale point of the exercise.

Before starting this I also pre teach any tricky vocabulary that I know is going to come up in the article just to make sure the final questions and answer session goes without too much stopping and starting to ask about vocabulary.

After students have got the answers then you can either display the answers on an overhead projector, or send students back to their original half of the group to see if they have all gotten the same answers.

Jigsaw Reading

This is another easy way to get students involved in the language and speaking. Select a relevant article related to the topic you are studying and chop it up into paragraphs. Hand out A4 paper with a simple one column table with as many boxes as there are paragraphs.

Hand out the paragraphs to the students considering which paragraphs are more difficult and should go to the higher level learners and which are slightly easier and can go to the lower ability students. 

Individually, students now summarise in their own words as far as possible their paragraphs and write the summary in a box in the table. Following this students pair up with students who had a different paragraph and they then read out their summaries whilst the other students make notes of it.

Rotate partners so that everyone can get every paragraph and after the first couple of times students have read their summaries, force students to turn over their paper and explain their paragraph from memory.

After the first couple of goes they should be able to do this and by the time they have explained to everyone in the group they should be reeling off their summary very comfortably.

A Word On Differentiation …

There is a lot of fun to be had for the students in the above activities but it is important to not forget that some students will require more support than others. Just asking students to do a role play with no support may be too much for some. 

Always consider using speaking frames, having sentence starters placed around the room, ‘useful language’ handouts, and always show a clear model of what it is you are expecting the students to produce. 

If you can tick those boxes then your speaking lesson will go that bit more smoothly.

All the best with your ESL speaking projects!

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ESL homework ideas

11 ESL Homework Ideas To Engage Your Learners & Simplify Lesson Planning 

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Are you looking for ESL homework ideas for your classes? If you’re thinking about setting homework you’re onto a good thing. Learning a language requires a lot of exposure and practice. And much of that happens outside of class. 

The more students make contact with English outside the classroom, the faster they’ll progress. And if you can connect their homework assignments to what you’re teaching in class, you’ll make lesson planning a lot easier for yourself. 

So, without further ado, here are 11 ESL homework ideas for adults that you can use with groups, individuals, in-person or online.

If you want to become a qualified online language teacher and earn a living from home, I recommend checking out CeOLT (Certificate of Online Language Teaching).

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How To Make Homework Work For You &Your Students 

speaking homework esl

Many ESL teachers are wary of setting homework because students often don’t do it! You may remember being set useless homework in language classes that you weren't motivated to do, such as learning lists of words for a test. 

The problem is, if ESL learners rely too much on you or on coming to lessons, they will make slow progress because so much language learning takes place outside of the classroom. 

The trick then is to integrate homework assignments into what happens in class so that it becomes non-negotiable. In the list of ESL homework ideas below, you’ll find tasks that are fun and motivating to do as well as ways to fit them into your class time. 

1.Read A Short Story Or Short Book Chapter 

short stories in english intermediate

Reading is the foundation of the StoryLearning method and makes for the perfect ESL homework idea.

Instead of spending time reading in class, get the students to do it between classes. 

They can find a quiet time to read the story or chapter as many times as they like.

In my short story books , they’ll find tools to help them understand the material such as glossaries and comprehension questions. 

In class, students can then discuss the chapter or story together. If you’re teaching 1:1, you can ask them to present a summary and show you new words they learned from the chapter. You can then discuss it together.  

For more ideas on how to use my short story books for teaching check out my Short Stories teacher’s Guide .

2. Listen To A Short Podcast Episode 

speaking homework esl

Many ESL students struggle with English listening skills so they need as much practice as possible. 

If you teach conversation classes then this activity will also mean fewer lesson planning headaches. And you won’t waste any class time on listening. 

Tell your student to listen to a short ESL podcast such as the BBC’s 6-Minute English podcast. Ask them to prepare a summary of it to present to you in class. If the episode includes show notes, they can compare their summary with those notes. 

You can also adapt this homework activity for groups and ask them to discuss the podcast in pairs in class. This is also a great opportunity to use class time to clarify and new words, or structures that came up in the episode. 

If you’re feeling ambitious or your students have a high level, you could plan a whole series of lessons or a semester around a particular podcast such as a true crime or other investigative journalism show. 

3. Presentation About A Passion 

speaking homework esl

Not everyone is passionate about learning English and many ESL students come to class because they have to. But even if they’re not interested in English, they must be interested in something, right? 

You can harness their hobbies and passions and generate some excitement for the English language by asking them to present a special object to the rest of the class. 

This can also work well in a 1:1 online lesson. You can ask your student to prepare a short talk about an object that they hold up to the webcam to show you. 

You can use time in class to work on presentation and storytelling skills. You can model this type of presentation by telling them about your own significant object so they know what to aim for.

4. Write A Review 

speaking homework esl

Who doesn’t love sharing their opinion whether it’s about the latest movie they’ve seen or the hot new restaurant they had dinner at? 

You can harness this desire and get your student to practice useful language by getting them to write reviews as homework. These could be movie reviews, product reviews, restaurant reviews etc. 

In class, you can take a look at the structure of reviews in English plus the language used such as colourful adjectives or phrases for giving opinions. 

That way, your students will have a model they can use to write their own reviews at home. Back in class, students can share their reviews with each other and discuss them – would they see this movie, buy this product etc or not based on the review. 

You can also give feedback both about the content of the reviews as well as any language points to improve. 

5. Get Creative 

speaking homework esl

Creativity requires constraints and there’s no greater one than writing a story in your second, third or fourth language. 

You can challenge students to write a short story based on words they’ve learned recently in class or on a particular topic you’ve been discussing. Give them a word count to respect as well. 

Again, you can use class time to read stories together and analyse their structure so that they know what to aim for. 

After they’ve written a short story at home, they can come back to class to read and discuss each others’ stories. 

6. Share Amazing Anecdotes 

speaking homework esl

Telling an interesting anecdote is a real skill in any language, especially in a new one that you're learning. But it's a great way to work on your speaking skills. 

You can use your class time to read or listen to anecdotes in English. You could even tell your learners a funny or sad story about yourself. Once they’ve understood what makes a great anecdote, it’s time to create their own one for homework. 

At home, learners can write their anecdotes, or even better, can prepare and rehearse them orally, so they’re ready to tell them in class. 

During the lesson, you and the other students can react to the anecdotes and ask follow-up questions. 

7. Blogs And Blogging 

speaking homework esl

Did you know that blogs are an incredibly rich resource for language learning and teaching? You can use blogs in many ways both inside and outside of the classroom. 

As a homework activity you could ask students to read a blog post of their choice and leave a comment for the writer. 

If your students prefer watching YouTube videos, they can watch videos and leave comments underneath them. 

In both cases, in class time, students can report back on the blog they read, why they chose it and what comment they left and why. 

If you and your students are feeling really ambitious, you could start a class blog or they could start writing their own individual blogs about their English learning journeys. 

For even more inspiration for your teaching, check out these best ESL bloggers .

8. Start A Podcast 

speaking homework esl

This one is a bit more ambitious, but as well as listening to podcasts, learners can also consider starting their own! 

In fact, English learner Daniel Goodson from Switzerland started his podcast, My Fluent Podcast , to develop his speaking skills and gain confidence. He interviews other learners who have similar projects. 

Of course, your students don’t have to make the podcast public. It can simply be a project between you and the members of the class. They could interview each other or otherwise upload short episodes on a topic of their choice. 

Again, if they do this outside of class as homework you can use time in class to give them feedback on their work. Their episodes can also be a springboard for further discussion as well as a listening comprehension activity for the other students. 

9. Class WhatsApp Group 

WhatsApp logo

Another way for students to use English outside the classroom thanks to digital tools is to create a class WhatsApp group.

Other chat apps like Telegram or Voxer would work just as well. 

In this group, you can ask your students questions or share material for them to discuss.

Their homework in this case could be as simple as sending at least one message per week in the group. For more ideas about using apps check out this post about English teaching apps.

10. Write A Letter 

speaking homework esl

Do you remember writing letters to a pen friend when you were learning languages at school? 

Instead of writing letters to someone else, your students can try some creative writing activities that involve writing letters to themselves. 

That’s right, you can ask them to write a letter to their younger self with advice or to their future self about goals and dreams. There’s even a website where you can write and schedule a letter to your future self called FutureMe . 

This activity is quite a personal one so you’d need to be willing to get vulnerable yourself and share your letter before encouraging your students to talk to each other about the content of their letters. 

11. The Student Becomes The Teacher 

speaking homework esl

Here’s an interesting reversal of classroom roles that works well with groups. For homework, you can ask your students to teach the rest of the class some new vocabulary or a spelling or grammar rule. 

You won’t expect them to give a whole class on the topic. But they could do a short presentation of the topic in the format they prefer – through song or story or in a more traditional way.

As long as you keep expectations clear, they’ll benefit from peer teaching this way. After all, you can only teach what you’ve understood well yourself. 

11 ESL Homework Ideas 

So there you have it – 11 engaging ESL homework ideas that your students will actually want to do outside of class! 

As you can see, these ESL homework ideas are a million miles away from the types of boring worksheets that you had to fill in for language classes at school. 

Thanks to these engaging ideas, you’ll make your lesson planning easier and your students will be excited to do their homework. And they’ll start to become more independent learners who make faster progress. 

speaking homework esl

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Making English Fun

Making English Fun

15 Of The Best ESL Speaking Games And Activities.

For English language learners speaking is probably one of the most important and most feared language skills they have to learn . They may be shy, in both languages, or they may be afraid of making a mistake in front of their friends or classmates.

One of the best ways to overcome this is to use English games and activities , introduce some fun into the lessons and these fears suddenly become less important.

We have been teaching English for a lot of years and here are 15 of the best English Speaking games and activities we have researched and trialed in our classrooms. They have been massively useful to us over the years, so we hope they are for you as well.

We have researched English Speaking Games for all levels, backgrounds and ages of students. Activities like the ”Yes/No game. Call My Bluff, On Call” can all be scaled to address student needs. Utilizing speaking games for students is a proven way of maximizing participation and retention of language.

It is important to try to over come students initial fears of speaking, No one likes to make mistakes or look foolish so creating a risk free and non judgmental environment in your classroom is vitally important.

I often try to speak in the students first language to show them that of course people make mistakes, and that is perfectly acceptable , of course some times funny, and nothing NOTHING to worry about!

This is a more difficult task with adult learners, but still achievable highlighting their motivations for learning the language and how it can benefit them at the beginning of sessions helps with this, especially if you go on to highlight how speaking is going to be the most important skill in the vas majority of these situations. In careers, social occasions and travel.

Speaking is the most important skill they will learn. One thing both younger and older students have in common? We all like to have fun. These speaking games below can all be adapted to suit either a Kindergarten classroom, ESL or otherwise, or a boardroom training session. There is something for every classroom situation.

Also where we have them on our site we will link to the files for you to download to make it more convenient for you. If you want to jump to a specific game just click on the list below .

Just before we jump into these 17 ESL Reading Games and Activities we have the four skills covered on the site. Speaking, Reading, Writing and Listening.

You can access the pages from the links below or click on the image to download them all in one PDF file for $2.99 or the price of a coffee ( a good one we admit! )

The Best ESL Games and Activities – 4 Booklets in 1
  • The Best ESL Listening Games and Activities.
  • The Best ESL Speaking Games and Activities.
  • The Best ESL Writing Games and Activities.
  • The Best ESL Reading Games and Activities.

English Speaking Games and Activities

  • 30 Second Speech
  • Logic Game – Downing Street
  • ESL Directions Game
  • Speaking Activities – Expressions
  • Speaking Activities – Responses
  • Mallets Mallet – Word Association Speaking Game
  • Make a Wish – Speaking Game
  • YES / NO Speaking Game.
  • Pictionary – English Speaking Game
  • Call My Bluff / Would I lie to you
  • Show and Tell

39 No-Prep/Low-Prep ESL Speaking Activities: For Teenagers and Adults (Teaching ESL Conversation and Speaking)

1. 30 Second Speech

This English speaking activity is both fun and useful. The aim is to get students to speak for 30 seconds about topics that may or may not be out of their comfort zone. We have a list of topics here for you to choose from, and of course you can think of your own.

There are two ways to approach this, you can introduce the task by asking them to work individually first, or move straight onto the game below.

  • Introduce the idea to the group and say that we will be focusing more and more on their speaking and presenting skills and that this lesson will be a bit of fun and good practice.
  • Ask how long 30 seconds is…. Is it a long time? (Relative of course!)
  • Say that they are going to be talking for 30 seconds about something they know about and that they have only 1 minute to prepare.
  • You can work your way around the class, or split your class into teams to do this depending on
  • Work your way round they class giving people a go at trying to speak for 30 seconds.

The 30 Second Speech game

As they practice the task above write the rules on the board and split class in half

  • 1) Pick a subject
  • 2) Talk for 30 seconds
  • 3) No hesitation or repetition ( although of course they are learning so be lenient with this!)
  • 4) If you can’t talk for 30 seconds the other team will get a chance to finish your time.
  • 5) If they can finish the time they will get the points instead.

Adaptations:

  • You can change the amount of time depending on the age and abilities of your students.
  • You can choose topics that will appeal to your students, if professional students you can choose topics from their careers for example.
  • To do this with varying abilities it is possible to change all aspects. From length of time speaking to the topics chosen.
  • you can work as teams and make it competitive or run it as a whole class activity.

2. Logic Speaking Lesson – Downing Street

speaking homework esl

These type of activities used to be in puzzle magazines all the time. There sis a fair deal of explaining required to them but basically it s a logical fill in the blanks. It is better suited to higher level students, but its a great English Speaking game when adapted properly.

We have a separate page for the full details, and it is in this speaking exercise book ( free download ) but will highlight the basics here to see if it is something that fits your teaching needs.

The aim is to fill in the table with all the information so you know everything about the residents of Downing street. However you have to walk around and ask the rest of the class for that information, only once you have spoken to everyone will you be able to work it out . This is a great English speaking game that gets the whole class taking to each other, and forgetting about the language they are doing that in!

You will need the table worksheet for students to fill in and the list of information and clues both on the links includes here

  • Pass out one clue and a table worksheet to fill in to each Student.
  • If you have fewer than 20 participants, give each person more than one clue until you run out.
  • If you have more than 20 students, cut up more than one copy of each and pass out duplicates to the group
  • Do not let participants read each other’s clues.
  • As they get the information they can start to fill in their table.
  • They must speak and listen to identify, as a group, what they learn from each clue.
  • The teachers role is to make sure they are speaking English and to point in the right direction if it gets a little confusing.

Once your students have the answers then it can be gone through together on the board or white board and it adds another speaking element to the lesson. This is a great speaking game for ESL students and other. It really encourages them to speak to each other. As an added bonus for teachers we get to act as facilitator rather than be stuck at the front of the classroom.

Adaptations: It is possible to add clues (carefully to make sure they fit the answers) doing this makes it much easier. The aim is to get the students speaking to each other not just the logic side of the activity.

speaking homework esl

3. Giving Directions Lesson plan

speaking homework esl

Ask and respond activities give students the comfort of a script to follow, which means those who are a little self conscious have some scaffolding to work from. It also means these activities are suitable for lower level students who need that extra help

Resources •A copy of a town map, or any town map printable from google for groups of students, a list of place names for students to pick from. We have one designed for younger learners here.

The activity.

  • Chose a student from each team (make three teams if you can.) who will come to the front and pick a place to start from the bag and then will pick a place to finish.
  • The students mentions the start building and then has to give directions to their team.
  • His/her team has to follow as they describe the directions (obviously they cant say the name of the place or the building that they are supposed to go.) If the team has it right they get points.
  • You can pre teach turn left, straight on, turn right as needed of course.
  • Offer points as you see fit for each team
  • Make sure as many get a chance to come to the front and speak as possible.

It is possible to actually have the directions already prewritten for students. This means they can practice reading, speaking and listening in one activity.

Also it is possible to have your class spend a lesson coming up with the directions themselves and then putting them all in a box or bag at the front for the whole class to use. This means you add writing and they are actually using their own work to prepare a lesson.

4. Speaking lessons – Expressions

One of the main problems when teacher oral English speaking lessons is that the class invariably turns into robots. This is not intentional, so much effort goes into speaking in another language that putting emotion and expression into what they are saying comes way , WAY down the list.

speaking homework esl

So sometimes a little nudge in the right direction is all they need. We have designed an ESL speaking game and lesson to do just that.

  • We have a worksheet we have prepared for you with some sentences that will require a lot of expression.
  • Write the word expression on the board and ask what is says and what it means
  • Explain that although this word can mean making your voice have feeling or emotion, it is also your facial expressions.
  • Show them what a voice without expression sounds like (you tube most boring voice in the world or something) or demonstrate yourself.. Let them know intonation and expression are SO important in English that they should try to think about them more.
  • Give out the work sheet with examples of sentences on and see let them work out how they should say each sentence to make it more natural.
  • Father TED Video here is a reasonable example of boring and dramatic voice. ( there is a bra in it in the first 5 seconds so set it up first if it is likely to cause problems )
  • Remind them to try to use not only expression in their voice but in their face as well. Demonstrate how difficult it is to sound sad when you look happy and that by using facial expression it actually makes speaking English easier!
  • Have the group work through the sayings and ask them to perform them together.
  • As a fun activity write something random on the board (I like peas, where is my pen, I have won the lottery) and have emotions and feelings written on the board. Choose a student number and have them say a phrase normally and then point at a different emotion and see if they can say it like that. If you want to make it a competition see if the rest of the class can work out what emotion they are trying to act out.
  • E.g.: Sad but won the lottery, happy but lost their pen etc.

Adding expression to their speech is a large step towards sounding natural and developing English fluency.

5. Responses Lesson

In English to sound more natural we have a set of almost automatic set of responses on hearing good, bad or surprising news. It doesn’t take much to teach these in ESL Speaking lessons and for ESL Students in particular it is a definite confidence builder for them.

  • Greet the class and walk around offering compliments to people, you look nice; I like your hair, nice shirt…etc. See what responses you get from this.
  • Write RESPONSES on the board and see if they have seen the word and if they can tell you what it means.  Write up congratulations on the board and ask when they would say this. Illicit ideas from the group.
  • Repeat but with my cute little rabbit died yesterday and see what they think the correct response should be.
  • Give out the worksheet and ask them to work in pairs to see if they can write the correct response to the appropriate sentence. Give them a couple of minutes to do this. Longer if needed. Then choose a student to say one and another student / group to try to give the answer. Work through them all.
  • Give life to the responses and let them know if they say sorry their voice has to mean it otherwise it might sound sarcastic. Same with congratulations etc.  So expression is very important in English to make sure the correct meaning is conveyed!
  • There are two spaces at the bottom for two sentences for them to write a sentence and then the appropriate response.

As a game you can then repeat the same sort or exercise as the activity above. Have a selection of sentences than usually require a response and then ask for the incorrect response. No one expects you to say congratulations when you tell them your little rabbits died yesterday!!!

speaking homework esl

6. Word Association Speaking Game

This English Speaking game, together with the YES/NO game below are tied for my favorite game to play with any age student ESL or other wise. They can, and have been, played with second language kindergarten students all the way up to native speaking business people with the same amount of fun. The language from the business people was perhaps a little ruder than the kindergarten children but only a little!

It is a superb English speaking game for ESL students and native speakers. It gets really REALLY competitive. you will need an inflatable hammer they have packs of 12 on amazon for about 12 dollars and that’s it!

This game is based on a old TV show from the UK called Wacaday. In it they had a rather colorful character called Timmy Mallet who, among other things, played a game called mallets mallet. In this game the players, always children, had to think of a word associated with whatever Timmy said. There was no hesitation, repetition, or ummm or errrrrs allowed or they got a bonk on the head. (softly of course) the winner was the one who didn’t get hit!

This is easier to show you than explain so here is a video of it! ( it was the 1980s so excuse the poor quality of the video, and of course the hair styles!)

Two students at a time come to the front and the teacher/helper gives them a word. They have to say a word related to the previous word in 3 seconds or less. They can not repeat, pause or say something unrelated.

If they get it wrong they get a ‘bonk’ on the head and 3 times bonked and a new pair or students comes up or you could even play winner stays on. For fun they can play against the teacher as well.

Here are some ideas.

  • MacDonald’s

Water, drink, tea, coffee, sugar, sweet, sour …..

You can make this much slower than the video if you are working with second language or ESL students, and if you don’t want a hammer you can use a rolled up piece of paper or just play it as a point game without the hammer. (its more fun with one of course!)

7. Wish Speaking and Writing lesson.

This is a take on the TV Show Call my Bluff, where contestants have to guess who is lying. In this version students have to guess who wishes / wants what. They can do this by picking and reading a wish out of the bag and then trying to guess who it belongs to. They hav to give a reason why they think that.

Note: I have done this, or a version of this, many times without issue. However there was one time when a student wrote that they wished their parents would get back together which was pretty heartbreaking. Although it is superb to share, in front of a class of other students may not be the time or place. I did of course talk to her after and sought some help from others in the school. It may be worth while including instructions to keep it light.

  • I do this by telling the class that i am not their teacher now, I am the genie from Aladdin and that I am going to give them three wishes, but one has to be to make the world a better place, one has to be for their family or friends and the last one can be for them. (And it can’t be I will have x more wishes)
  • Give out some scrap paper and let them have a few mins to think about it then they have to write the wishes down but no names.
  • Once completed say that we are going to have an activity. The class will have to guess whose wishes are whose.
  • You will have three people at the front and need to mix up the pieces of paper. then hand them back to the students. Maybe they are mixed maybe they are not.
  • One student at a time will read one of the lists of wishes and the rest of the class have to guess who they think the wishes belong to.
  • You can continue till all the students have had a try.

Adaptations: This is also great as an Icebreaker activity for students and teacher to get to know each other. You can keep the activity as wishes or ask them to write three things about themselves. You can even change it to two things true and one lie to add some fun and creativity. ( and to create another English Speaking game called ”would I lie to you” or Call my Bluff.

8. Yes – No Game – Speaking Lesson 

When I said that The Word Association game above and this game were tied as my favorite English Speaking game I lied. This is my number one game. It is just perfect for all levels of English learner. It can be made easier for younger and ESL students and learners and more difficult for higher levels. No matter what level of learner is in the class you can use this game.

Now watch the video to see someone very VERY good at asking the questions in action. (these are native speakers so of course he tries very hard to catch them out and speaks very quickly)

It is better to teacher this to students with at least a basic abilty, but it doesnt have to be high level as you can level the wuestion you ask.

Write up questions on the board and say that today we are going to look at question that are answered with yes/no. .

  • The yes no game is from a TV show around the world, people have to come out and answer the questions the teacher (at first) asks. These will nearly all be yes or no questions.
  • The student must not answer with yes or no, or nod their head or shake their head, or say uh huh etc etc.
  • It sounds easy, but it isn’t!
  • They will get carried away with this so take time to calm them down between students, and it is excellent practice for adding language to answers.
  • Once they have the hang of it students can also be brought up to ask the questions. The activity then becomes student led and the teacher can observe and advise.

Tips: Ask questions starting with do you, can you , will you etc usually catch students out. Also you can repeat the students answer and add yes, or no to the end and it might catch them out to nod or repeat you.

It is simply awesome to play this and as I said earlier even 5 and 6 year olds quickly grasp this English speaking game. Once i have played it with my students it is the most requested speaking game every lesson following that.

9. Pictionary – English Speaking Game.

Allowing your students to communicate with each other takes off some of the pressure of a whole class environment and allows them to risk take with their English speaking in a less public arena 

In this game, each student in the pair draws a picture, keeping their paper shielded from the eyes of their partner. Ideally, pictures should be fairly simple. Once the picture is complete, they explain to their partner, using words only, how to replicate the image this can be done at a desk or as a whispers type activity across school halls if you want a more physical speaking game.

For example, if a student has drawn the stereotypical square house with a triangle roof, he might say: “draw a house, with a red roof and blue door. He may miss out how many windows, the family in front of it or all manner of details.

This allows the teacher to compare the two drawings with the students and ask what language they could have added to get more details into the picture. This really enables students to start to think about expanding and adding to the phrases they say.

The goal of this game is for each partner to replicate the other’s drawing by listening and understanding these spoken directions. The difference in drawings is often pretty funny as well.

speaking homework esl

10. Guess who 

Although you can use the Guess Who board game if you have it, its about 15 USD on Amazon if you have a need! It is probably easier and more adaptable for the culture or location you are teaching in to make a simple version with famous people from your area.

Students simpley draw the name of a famous person and photo if needed out of a hat (you’ll need to prepare these slips in advance!) and their partner or the rest of the class tries to guess who is on the paper by asking a series of yes/no questions.

it is a fun and engaging English speaking game that tests questioning knowledge.

11. Call My Bluff / Two Truths and A Lie

This is a similar game to the Make a Wish game above, but Call My Bluff is a more difficult and fun game which is perfect at the start of term as a ‘getting to know you’ kind of game. It is also a brilliant ice breaker between students if you teach classes who do not know one another — and especially essential if you are teaching a  small class size .

The game is excellent for practicing English speaking skills , though make sure you save some time for after the game to comment on any mistakes students may have made during the game. (I generally like to reserve this for after the game, so you don’t disrupt their fluency by correcting them as they speak).

With older groups you can have some real fun and you might be surprised what you’ll learn about some of your students when playing this particular EFL game.

  • Why use it?  Ice-breaker; Speaking skills
  • Who it’s best for:  Appropriate for all levels and ages but best with older groups

How to play:

  • Write 3 statements about yourself on the board, two of which should be lies and one which should be true.
  • Allow your students to ask you questions about each statement and then guess which one is the truth. You might want to practice your poker face before starting this game!
  • If they guess correctly then they win.
  • Extension:  Give students time to write their own two truths and one lie.
  • Pair them up and have them play again, this time with their list, with their new partner. If you want to really extend the game and give students even more time to practice their speaking/listening skills, rotate partners or run as a whole class activity.
  • Bring the whole class back together and have students announce one new thing they learned about another student as a recap

12. Doctors In

speaking homework esl

Actually this stems for a party (or drinking) game at universities and can be adapted to what ever vocabulary or topic you are teaching at the time. In the university version we all stick a post it to our foreheads and have to guess the famous person we are. Similar to the Guess who game above. In ESL or Classroom use we can do this with Jobs , animals, furniture, absolutely anything all you need are some post its or similar to stick to peoples heads or backs – anywhere they can not read it. It is a great ESL speaking game for classrooms with limited resources.

  • Write the terms, problems or vocabulary you want on to Post It Notes and stick to the students back.
  • The Students must walk about asking questions of their students on the word, yes and no questions work better, but longer ones can be used.
  • Hopefully Students will be able to get enough information to guess what their word is.
  • This game can be adapted for old or young students, or even university students 😉

13. Show and Tell

This classic classroom activity still has a place in modern classrooms. Students simply bring in something they would like to Show and Tell to their classmates. It practices students speaking ability, and their ability to prepare short written scripts that they will have to read. For those not talking it practices their listening ability, especially if you add a could of quiz questions at the end of each show and tell part.

You can change this by having a mystery box and they have to describe the item with out looking to their classmates and have them try to guess ( or the student of course) what it is.

Maybe its because i am writing this just a couple of days after Christmas, but I notice there are a lot of party games in this list. It might be that, but it might also be because they just work. Everyone, young and old, likes to have fun and these games provide that in abundance. Taboo is no exception.

It is simply a deck of cards, you can make your own or pick up a glossy set on Amazon for not much. On the card they have one target word and four words underneath. The player, in one minute or what ever time limit you decide to set has to try to explain what the target word is with out mentioning it, or the four related words underneath.

The beauty of this game is that you can adapt it to whichever topic you have been studying and make it easier or more difficult depending on the age and abilities of your students. It works in ESL and native speaking classrooms.

speaking homework esl

15. Think Fast

This is a nice physical game for warm up or for end of class consolidation. You just need a bean bag and some ideas.

It is similar to the Mallets Mallet Word assocation game above but involves the who class rather than pairs at the front.

  • First have your students stand facing each other in a circle, or as much of one as you can make if you are in a classroom.
  • Then explain that you are going to say a topic, maybe animals, or colors anything.
  • When you do you are going to throw the ben bag or ball at a student ( to catch not hurt!) and when they catch they have to then say something in that topic,
  • Then throw the ball on to another student in the circle.
  • That student has to do the same, but it has to be a different word. If they get it wrong, pause or repeat they have to sit down and wait fo the next round.

This is great fun and students of ALL ages get into it very quickly. You can also allow then to pick their own subjects after a few goes.

The simple fact is that students of all ages learn better when they are having fun. If you can try to incorporate some of these English Speaking games and activities into your lessons then you will find that more and more your students are willing to engage and practice the language you are teaching them. There are hundreds more activities, but these are our favorites. We have a booklet of ten of them for free download if you want an idea of some of the resources behind them, but we will also be putting them up on the site as time goes by so you can take them individually as you need.

Hope these helped you as much as they have helped us!

About Making English Funn

Hi I’m Marc. A teacher of over 15 years, English, General Studies and Outdoor Education. Thought it was about time to sharing both what I have learnt during that time and the resources I have put together. On this site we aim to teach the theory and share our thoughts, but also go that one step further and give you access to the hard resources you need for your class or for you children

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speaking homework esl

I have been a teacher of English for over 15 years, in that time i made hundreds and thousands of resources and learnt so much i think its worth sharing. Hopefully to help teachers and parents around the world.

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23 ESL Speaking Activities for Adults: Free Their Inner Kids

Younger ESL students know what’s up. They treat being in ESL class like being on the playground.

And that’s how it should be! ESL class is the perfect place to make English mistakes.

But speaking out loud in front of other people—especially in a second language—can be nerve-wracking for many adults.

4. I Like People

5. sentence auction, 8. news brief, 9. running dictation, esl discussion activities, 10. surveys and interviews, 11. show and tell, 12. short talks, 13. video dictionary, 14. pechakucha, 15. two texts, 16. discuss and debate, 17. untranslatable, 18. skill share, activities to build speaking confidence, 19. reading aloud for fluency, 20. mimicking public figures, 21. sharing struggles with a trusted person, 22. reflecting on successful past english classes, 23. reading stories of progress.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Man sitting in circle of people

This well-known ESL game is great speaking practice for adults. The teacher tells the class that a particular crime has been committed. For fun, make it locally specific. For example:

“Last Friday night, sometime between ___ and ___, someone broke into the ____ Bank on ____ Street.”

Depending on the size of your class, pick several students as “Suspects.” The “Police” can work in groups of 2-4, and you need one Suspect for each police group. So, for example, in a class of 20 you could choose four Suspects and then have four groups of four Police for questioning.

Tell the class: “___, ___, ___ and ___ were seen near the scene of the crime, and the police would like to question them.”

The Suspects go outside or to another room to prepare their story. They need to decide all of the details about where they were during the time of the crime. For example: If they were at a restaurant, what did they eat? What did it cost? Who arrived first?

1. The Police spend some time preparing their questions.

2. The Suspects are called back in and go individually to each police group. They’re questioned for a few minutes, and then each one moves on to the next group.

3. The Police decide whether their answers match enough for them to have a reasonable Alibi. (Maybe up to five mistakes is reasonable.)

Many people think of this game as a listening activity, but it can very quickly become a speaking activity.

There are a number of ESL websites that will allow you to quickly create a set of Bingo cards containing up to 25 words, phrases or even whole sentences. They’ll allow you to make as many unique cards as you need to distribute a different card to each student in the class. Each card can contain the same set of words arranged differently, or you can choose to have more or less than 25 items involved.

Rather than having students mark up their cards, you can give them markers (such as stones or sunflower seeds) to place on each square as they recognize it. This way the markers can be removed and the game can be repeated.

For the first round, the teacher should “call” the game. The first student to get five markers in a row in any direction shouts out “Bingo!” Then you should have this student read out every item in their winning row.

The winner is congratulated and then rewarded by becoming the next Caller. This is a great speaking opportunity. Everyone removes their markers and the game starts again. Every expression that’s called tends to be repeated quietly by everyone in the room, and by the end of a session, everyone can say all of the expressions on the card.

In this game, one player has a card listing four words:

  • The first word is the secret word. The aim of the game is to get another player to say this word. The student with the card will need to describe this word until another student figures out the secret word.
  • The other three words are the most obvious words that you might use to explain the secret word. They are all “taboo” and cannot be used in the student’s description of the secret word.

This game can be played between two teams. It can also be played between partners. You can create your own sets of words based on what you’ve been studying , or you can find sets in your textbook and on the internet.

Taboo is great for challenging students to expand on the vocabulary they would usually use, and helps them to think outside of the box. You can try timing them for an extra challenging element, or even play it as a whole class to get everyone involved in trying to guess the word on the card.

Students will have great fun playing, while also improving their speaking and communication skills, making it an ideal ESL game.

Adults do like to have fun, as long as they aren’t made to feel or look stupid. This is a brilliant game for helping them think quickly and speak more fluent English (rather than trying to translate from their native tongue).

1. Students sit on chairs in a circle, leaving a space in the circle for the teacher to stand.

2. First, they’re asked to listen to statements that the teacher makes and stand if it applies to them, such as: “I like people who are wearing black shoes,” “I like people who have long hair,” etc.

3. Next, the teacher asks standing students to change places with someone else who’s standing.

4. Now it becomes a game. The teacher makes a statement, students referred to must stand and quickly swap places. When the students move around, the teacher quickly sits in someone’s spot, forcing them to become the teacher.

5. The students quickly get into the swing of this game. Generally, they’ll quickly notice a “cheating” classmate who hasn’t stood up when they should have, and they’ll also eagerly encourage a shy student who finds himself standing in the gap with no ideas.

This game has no natural ending, so keep an eye on the mood of the students as they play. They may start to run out of ideas, making the game lag. Quickly stand and place yourself back into the teacher position and debrief (talk with them about how they felt about the game).

Create a list of sentences, some correct and some with errors.

  • The errors should be related to a language topic you’re teaching
  • The number of sentences will depend on your students’ abilities. 20 is a good number for intermediate students.
  • The ratio of correct and incorrect is up to you, but it’s a good idea to have more than 50% correct.

Next to the list of sentences draw three columns: Bid, win, lose.

You can set a limit for how much (imaginary) money they have to spend, or just let them have as much as they want.

They need to discuss (in English) and decide whether any sentence is 100% reliable, in which case they can bid 100 dollars (or whatever unit you choose). If they’re totally sure that it’s incorrect, they can put a “0” bid. If they’re unsure, they can bid 20, 30, 40, based on how likely it is to be correct.

  • When all of their bids are written in, get pairs to swap their papers with other pairs for marking.
  • Go through the sentences, discussing which are correct and why.
  • For correct sentences, the bid amount is written in the “win” column. For incorrect sentences, it’s written in the “lose” column.
  • Both columns are totaled, and the “lose” total is subtracted from the “win” total.
  • Papers are returned, and partners discuss (in English) how their bidding went.

This game can be played with a class as small as three, but it also works with large classes.

1. On the board draw a grid of boxes (e.g. 6 x 6). Mark one axis with numbers, the other with letters.

2. On a piece of paper or in a notebook (out of sight) draw the same grid. On your grid, fill in scores in all of the boxes. Most of them should be numbers, and others will be letters. It doesn’t matter which numbers you choose, but it’s fun to have some small ones (1, 2, 3, etc.) and some very big ones (500, 1000, etc.). About one in four boxes should have the letter “T” for “Typhoon.”

3. Mark a place on the board to record each team’s score.

4. Ask questions to each team. If they answer correctly, they “choose a box” using the grid labels. The teacher checks the secret grid, and writes the score into the grid on the board. This score also goes into the team’s score box.

5. If the chosen box contains a number, the scores simply add up. But if the box contains a “T,” the team then chooses which other team’s score they want to “blow away” back to zero.

You can spice it up by adding different symbols in some of the boxes. I use:

  • Swap: They must swap their score with another team’s score.
  • S: Steal. They can steal a score.
  • D: Double. They double their own score.

Here’s an example of one Typhoon variation:

1. Devise several scenarios with two or more characters and a premise. These could be something simple, like someone going to a bakery to buy a cake or visiting a museum with an unusual exhibit.

2. Divide your students into teams, with one student per role.

3. Give your students the premise for the scenario they’re going to act out. For example, you might say, “You’re a father at a bakery, trying to buy a cake with your child’s favorite cartoon character. The baker has never heard of this character. You need to describe how the character looks so that the baker can create the cake you want.”

4. Each team member will have about five minutes to prepare their part of the skit. Ask each student to prepare separately. That way, the other students they are interacting with must react spontaneously to their questions and statements.

5. Each team will perform their vignette in front of the whole class. Limit the time to play out each scenario to five or ten minutes.

6. At the end of each round, the non-performing class members can ask questions of those performing their roles. The performing students should respond in character to the questions.

This activity will help students react to impromptu situations.

Prepare a number of short news stories for different students to read. You can use stories directly from a source like:

  • The Times in Plain English
  • Breaking News English
  • News in Levels
  • FluentU (Each video on FluentU has transcripts, so you can let your students read the transcripts as an alternative to watching the clip.)

1. Divide the class into teams of four or five students. Each team will read one of the short news stories you’ve prepared.

2. One student on the team will pretend to be a news anchor reporting on the story. Another student can play a field reporter, who will interview the remaining students. The remaining students can play either passers-by or eyewitnesses to an incident.

3. You can prepare multiple stories for each team. With each new story, students should exchange roles, so that they each have a chance to practice different kinds of speaking.

Students playing the “eyewitnesses” will get the opportunity to answer spontaneously, especially if they’re not privy to the reporter’s questions ahead of time. The news anchor and reporter roles will require more formal, neutral English.

The interviewees will also have more opportunities to practice speech that expresses emotion, since they’ll be communicating their opinion on a hot topic.

To stretch out this activity into multiple lessons, consider assigning your students a writing exercise in which they “manufacture” their own news stories.

These news stories can have a humorous angle which could afford students the opportunity to explore satire using English.

This useful activity requires students to use all four language skills—reading, writing, listening, and speaking—and if carefully planned and well-controlled can cause both great excitement and exceptional learning.

Pair students up. Choose who will run and who will write. (At a later stage they could swap tasks.)

Print out some short texts (related to what you’re studying) and stick them on a wall away from the desks. You should stick them somewhere out of sight from where the students sit, such as out in the corridor.

There could be several numbered texts, and the students could be asked to collect two or three each. The texts could include blanks that they need to fill in later, or they could be asked to put them in order. There are many possibilities here!

The running students run (or power-walk) to their assigned texts, read, remember as much as they can and then return to dictate the text to the writing student. Then they run again. The first pair to finish writing the complete, correct texts wins.

Be careful that you do not:

  • Let students use their phone cameras to “remember” the text.
  • Let “running” students write—they can spell words out and tell their partner when they’re wrong.
  • Let “writing” students go and look at the text (or let “running” students bring it to them).

Woman standing in a circle of people clapping

Becoming competent at asking and answering questions is invaluable in language learning. It is helpful in a range of contexts, including anything from speaking exams, to casual conversation.

In the simplest form of classroom survey practice, the teacher hands out ready-made questions—maybe 3 for each student—around a topic that is being studied.

For example, let’s say the topic is food . Each student could be given the same questions, or there could be several different sets of questions such as questions about favorite foods, fast foods, breakfasts, restaurants, home-style cooking, etc.

Then each student partners with several others (however many is required), and asks them the questions on the paper. In each interaction, the student asking the questions will note down the responses from their peers.

At the end of the session, students may be asked to stand up and summarize what they found out from their survey. This helps them to consolidate a range of opinions based on the same topics. You can change the difficulty of the topics based on the level of your students, and center it around what you are focusing on in lessons.

This makes it a great exercise to use for all your classes and is easily customizable based on the needs of your students.

Students can be asked to bring to school an object to show and tell about. This can be anything from a favorite item of clothing , to a souvenir they picked up on an interesting trip. This is lots of fun because students will often bring in something that’s meaningful to them or which gives them pride. That means they’ll have plenty to talk about! Encourage students to ask questions about each other’s objects.

Instead of having students bring their own objects, you could provide an object of your own and ask them to try to explain what they think it is and what its purpose is. Another option is to bring in pictures for them to talk about. This could be discussed with a partner or in a group, before presenting ideas in front of the whole class.

Generate a stronger discussion and keep things flowing by asking students open-ended questions. Speaking for an extended period about one object will help students challenge themselves to say different, and more creative things. The exercise can also be easily repeated by asking students to bring in different objects the next time, or by providing a selection of your own objects to inspire them.

Create a stack of topic cards for your students, so that each student will have their own card.

Each student draws their card, and then you assign them a time limit—this limit may be one minute initially, or maybe three minutes when they have had practice. This is the amount of time that they’ll have to speak about their given topic.

Now, give the students a good chunk of time to gather their thoughts. You may want to give them anywhere from five minutes to half an hour for this preparation stage. You can let them write down three to five sentences on a flashcard to remind them of the direction they’ll take in the course of their talk.

To keep listening students focused, you could create an instant “Bingo” game. The class is told the topic and asked to write down five words that they might expect to hear (other than common words such as articles, conjunctions and auxiliary verbs). They listen for those words, crossing them off as they hear them and politely raising a hand if they hear all five.

You can adjust the complexity of the task depending on your students, and gradually increase the difficulty if you play more regularly to ensure you are stretching their skills.

The authentic English videos on FluentU —with its built-in vocabulary lists—can be catalysts for conversation practice. Every word used in a video has a definition, plus extra usage examples.

In this activity, students will learn some vocabulary words from the videos, then create their own definitions or usage examples for those words.

Select several FluentU videos for teams of your students to watch, according to their level. Then, You can then use the built-in vocabulary list to select the words you’d like your students to learn.

In the example below, you might target certain words in the Vocab list, such as “anecdote,” “engaging” and “brisk.”

FluentU screenshot showing vocabulary list

Divide your class up into teams of about three or four students apiece and have them watch the selected videos. Students will work together to come up with new usage examples or definitions to illustrate the vocabulary words from their chosen video

FluentU screenshot showing definition of "brisk"

Teams will then take turns presenting words (and their own examples or definitions) to each other. Students on each team should take turns presenting their example sentences or definitions.

Students can also be given time for discussing the words they learn, having conversations about what the words mean and how to use them.

After watching the other teams’ presentations, students who didn’t watch the video can take the accompanying quiz on FluentU, to see how well they learned the target words from their fellow students.

If your students have laptops (or a computer lab they can use) and are reasonably familiar with presentation software (such as PowerPoint), then all that’s left to acquire for this activity is access to an LCD projector.

Students can have a lot of fun speaking while giving a presentation to the class. Using projected images helps to distract some attention away from the speaker and can be helpful for shy students.

The “PechaKucha” style of presentation * can give added interest with each student being allowed to show 20 slides only for 20 seconds each (the timing being controlled by the software so that the slides change automatically) or whatever time limit you choose. You could make it 10 slides for 15 seconds each, for example.

You could also add rules such as “no more than three words on each slide” (or “no words”) so that students must really talk and not just read the slides. They need to be given a good amount of time, either at home or in class, to prepare themselves and practice their timing. It can also be prepared and presented in pairs, with each partner speaking for half of the slides.

* PechaKucha originated in Tokyo (in 2003). The name means “chitchat.”

“Nowadays held in many cities around the world, PechaKucha Nights are informal and fun gatherings where creative people get together and share their ideas, works, thoughts, holiday snaps—just about anything, really.”— the PechaKucha 20×20 format .

This challenging task is great for more capable students and it involves reading. Having texts in front of them can make adult students feel more supported.

Choose two short texts and print them out. Print enough of each text for half of the class. Create a list of simple questions for each text and print out the same quantity.

Divide the class into two groups and hand out the texts. Hang onto the question sheets for later. One group gets one text, the second group gets the other text. The texts can be about related topics (or not).

Group members then read their texts and are free to talk about them within their group, making sure they all understand everything. After five minutes or so, take the papers away.

  • Each student is paired with someone from the other group. Each student must tell their partner everything they learned from their text. Then they must listen to (and remember) what the other student tells them about their group’s text.
  • Students return to their original groups and are given a list of questions about their original text.
  • Students are paired again, this time with a different person from the other group. Each student must test their partner using the questions about the text—which their partner never read and was only told about. Likewise, the students quizzing their partners must answer questions about the text they were told about.

On another day, use two different texts and try this activity again. Students do remarkably better the second time!

More mature students can discuss and debate issues with a partner. They can even be told which side of the argument they should each try to promote. This could be a precursor to a full-blown classroom debate.

Working with a partner or small group first gives them an opportunity to develop and practice the necessary vocabulary to speak confidently in a larger forum.

It would be a good idea to debate something relevant to the topics you are studying currently, as it will mean that your students have a bigger bank of information and vocabulary to pull from and keep the conversation flowing.

You could have smaller groups debate in front of the rest of the class, and have the other students decide on who they think won the debate by the end of it, explaining their reasons why. This ensures that both their speaking and listening comprehension skills are being tested, and keeps the whole class engaged.

Depending on the level of your students, you can change the level of the debate topics you assign them. This makes it a great accessible option for a range of learners, which you can easily customize based on the needs and interests of your students.

If you happen to have students in your classroom with different native languages, they’ve almost certainly stumbled across words without direct English translations. You can use your students’ expertise in their own languages to spark conversation in the classroom.

1. Divide the class into small groups of students—preferably, each group of students will represent two or more native languages.

If the students in a group all speak the same native language, no worries—there are still different dialects, regionalisms and variations in individual experiences to drive conversation about each “untranslatable” word and its possible English definition.

2. Ask each student to come up with a small handful of words that they cannot translate directly into English.

3. Students will then take turns presenting to their respective groups, pronouncing each featured word and explaining—to the best of their ability—what it means in English.

4. After the presentation of each word, the other students will have the opportunity to ask questions, to clarify the word’s meaning and usage.

5. Where possible, each student who hears a presentation can also be asked to think of a word in their own language that means the same as the presenter’s “untranslatable” word.

6. Depending on the skill level of your students, they can also participate in an open discussion of the featured word and its meaning after the presentation.

This activity encourages students to conceptualize the meanings of words in both their native language and English.

1. Ask each student to come up with a hobby or skill they can share with the rest of the class in a short presentation. You can give them several days to prepare ahead of time.

2. If you have a larger class, you can divide your students up into teams to allow each student more time to present in a smaller group setting. You can also pair off your students, so one student will take turns presenting to one other student only.

3. Students will take turns making a short presentation to their respective audience. In their presentation, they should explain their chosen hobby, skill or activity in clear terms that can be easily understood.

4. Within their presentations, students will also give simple, step-by-step instructions, to teach their audience members the target skill.

5. After each presentation, the student’s audience must ask the presenter at least one relevant question pertaining to the skill or activity in question. The questions should clarify their understanding of the process.

6. When the presentations and “Q & A” sessions are done, students can pair off with other partners or form new teams.

Variation :

Audience members can use the information they’ve gleaned from a teammate’s presentation to explain the process they’ve learned to someone in the class who didn’t hear the original presentation.

The original presenter can act as a subject matter expert, prompting their former audience member (as needed) to explain the process more clearly.

Man speaking to a group of people

All you have to do is select a piece of text, which students will practice reading out loud until they can read it fluently. The goal is to work towards reading the text in front of an audience.

Short pieces like poems work best here, as students tend to memorize them easier. The websites Poetry Out Loud and Classic Poetry Aloud  are great for finding such poems.

Don’t forget to have the students focus on body language as well as how they speak. If they don’t know how to appear confident, start with a small lesson about body language. Give them a checklist so they can use it as a reference. For example:

  • Are you standing tall?
  • Are you looking at the audience?
  • Are you speaking loudly enough?
  • Are you enunciating your words?
  • How is the tone of your voice?
  • Are you smiling?

Once your students understand how to speak and focus on body language, have them read the text in front of a mirror. When they feel they are ready, have them read it in front of you, then work up to reading with a partner.

You can track their progress in class by filming their speeches so students can see the progression. Let them know that no one else will see what you filmed.

An activity like this should last no longer than a month, or else students might get bored of it. At the end of the month, students can present their poems/texts to the class.

Watching videos of public figures can help students see good examples of how to appear confident. Public figures can include news anchors, politicians or even famous celebrities.

Start off by doing a class activity where the students analyze why the public figure they are watching is so confident. You could use a checklist, and have students look for each element while they’re watching, or leave it open-ended.

While the students are discussing, write their answers on the board. You can watch a few short videos at a time for your student to see if there any commonalities. John F. Kennedy and Steve Jobs are great examples of speakers to observe in your class.

Once you’ve identified the qualities of confident speakers, students can then begin mimicking. Start off with a short video or give the students a choice between several. Students should simply mimic what they see on the video—including body language and tone.

It’s easiest to copy the speaking if there’s a transcript or subtitles available, so a short fragment from a TED Talk , captioned YouTube video or an exciting video from FluentU would be a suitable idea.

Have your students move on to longer videos when they are ready. Depending on your class, you can have them show you what they’ve done and conference with you about how it has helped them before moving on to longer videos.

Having students share their struggles with you is great for building rapport and trust between teacher and student. The more they trust you, the more feedback you can get about your lessons. Students might also come up to you and ask for help, which in turn help them get extra practice.

Don’t introduce this activity until you’ve known the students for at least a month. You want them to be familiar with the class and you before asking them to reveal their feelings. Any sooner and it may backfire on you.

To begin, tell a story about something you’ve struggled with (it doesn’t have to be academic, as long as it’s a skill you were trying to learn) where sharing your woes helped you push on. Give them time—a week or so—to think about what they’ve been struggling with and to record it somewhere.

After a week, tell your students that you will start conferences with them and in groups. Make sure they don’t feel pressured to share all their struggles in the beginning, even something small will help them.

Don’t fall into the trap of allowing students to complain or compare themselves with other students. If they do this, it will only make them feel worse about themselves. If you see this happening in groups or during your conferences, redirect the conversation to focus on just the student who is sharing.

Sometimes students are so focused on what they have to achieve that they forget how far they’ve come already. Asking your students to reflect on past English classes forces them to see where they used to be and where they are now.

In fact, many of your students will probably be very surprised at how much they have progressed. This serves as a confidence booster, and also as motivation to continue pushing themselves.

Some ideas for how to have your students reflect include writing in a journal , keeping a learning log, collecting works in a portfolio and periodically filming them thinking or reading out loud.

Set aside some time to conference with students regularly about their progress—every two weeks or monthly. Make sure you keep your own conference notes so you can also see how the student has progressed.

Take a look back through the lessons you taught at the beginning of the course as a class to show your students what you were doing as a class then, versus now. Reassure them that they will continue to learn, and that in a few months they will look back on the challenging material they are studying now and find it much easier.

When your students are feeling discouraged, it’s a great confidence booster to see how other people have also struggled yet improved and grown. Make sure not to label these “success stories” though, as you don’t want to give students the false view that their English (or anything!) is either a failure or a success.

The most important takeaway is that learning is a journey where you’re constantly developing and progressing. Mistakes and weaknesses are not “failures,” but natural and necessary. Reading stories of others’ struggles and progress helps students to see that it will take time—they just need to persevere and put in continual effort.

If possible, invite some of your past students to share their stories with your current class. If this is not possible, look for written articles or stories that you could base a lesson on—such as stories of famous celebrities whose first language isn’t English.

For example, Arnold Schwarzenegger immigrated to the United States and commonly shared how hard he worked on his pronunciation when he was trying to break into Hollywood. Penelope Cruz didn’t begin learning English until age 20, and in several interviews, she mentions common English mistakes she made when first arriving in the USA.

The above ESL activities for adults are sure to help your students come out of their shells and practice their speaking skills—all while having fun! 

Check out this article next: 

Wondering how to teach ESL to adults? While your lessons might be a bit less chaotic than with younger students, they don’t have to be dull or boring. Everyone enjoys…

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Speaking Worksheets

  • Getting to Know You - Ideal for first lesson. Students interview each other, and perhaps teacher. Watch for trick questions. Clearly no-one in the class has "gone" to London.
  • WH- Question Practice - Teacher or pair student asks student to pose various WH- questions.

Global English

Train to Teach English: No.1 for TESOL Certification Online

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Great homework ideas for ESL students

Great homework ideas for ESL students

Discover great homework ideas for ESL students in your classes

While most people don't want to do extra outside of class, there is no denying that having some English input between lessons is a great way for our students to take ownership of their learning and see faster English improvement. 

So here are five great homework ideas for ESL students:

1. Truth or lie?

Students prepare three short stories about themselves for homework. One is true, the others are false. In the next lesson they tell their partner their stories while their partner asks questions to decide which story is true. Then reverse roles.

A game element is really motivating and this works with many different language levels.

2. Prepare for a quiz

Do you want them to remember new verbs, tense structures or vocabulary? Are you doing a general revision lesson next? Ask your students to revise at home, telling them you’ll put them into teams next week to answer questions. Have each team make up a distinct buzzer sound if you like so they can ‘buzz in’ with the right answer. Winning team gets a prize.

Works best with teens and kids; a neat reason to revise at home and much more fun than an individual test.

3. Set up a FB group for the class

Ask a question a week, invite responses and encourage respectful conversation and debate. Be careful; not everyone likes social media and you may choose a more appropriate platform for sharing ideas outside of class.

Collaboration in English outside of class can be stimulating, build relationships and practice real-world English.

4. Riddles/puzzles/tongue twisters

A cowboy rode into town on Friday, stayed three days, and rode out again on Friday. How did he do that? (*answer at bottom of the page)

Lateral thinking questions like the above can be fun and all the while, students are reading English. Alternatively, have students practice tongue twisters at home and either translate one from their own language or make one up. Have them share with the class next time.

It is a lot of fun hearing tongue twisters translated from other languages.

5. Watch YouTube video stories and report back

There are plenty of great story videos ESL students can watch at home and which are graded for level.

In the example video at the bottom of this blog, you'll see a short past tense story, suitable for low level learners. After watching it for homework, here are two ways you can work on it in your next class: 1. Ask general comprehension questions on the video.   2. Re-create the story as a class, eliciting it from students piece by piece with the help of key words from the story as prompts on the board.

Alternatively divide the class into A and B.

For homework, A's watch one video and B's another. Pair an A and a B up in class afterwards to summarise the stories to each other.

Video is so engaging and it is much easier to get students to watch something than write something.

As teachers, we can help our students by giving homework tasks that are meaningful, relevant and engaging. Also students are more likely to do the work if it will be checked or used in some way in the following lesson. 

We hope we have inspired you to choose fun, task-based homework activities that have a solid focus and outcome. Notice, too, how there is always a meaningful follow-up to the homework task in class.

When planning homework tasks, you can also take your inspiration from the real-world and ask students to do things like text each other or listen to English music.

The possibilities for productive homework tasks are endless. 

*Answer to lateral thinking question: Friday is a horse .

The Global English  120 hour TESOL Premier course . contains great content on crafting lesson plans and a section on how to give homework effectively.

Check out our ready-to-print and use TEFL lessons   here.

Ask any questions about TESOL training and ESL classes directly  here  or join the chat in our friendly  Facebook group .

  • Author: William
  • Date: 06/11/2018

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speaking homework esl

Five no-prep speaking fluency activities for ESL students

photo of the author

When asked why they study English, most students will say it’s because they want to communicate. They might also want to find a better job, pass an exam or simply be better at English, but oral communication is what students usually put very high on their priority list . What is more, many foreign language students admit that the fact that they can speak a language they couldn’t speak, say, a year earlier, makes them feel extremely satisfied and keeps them motivated. Whether you teach low-level or advanced learners, use these five speaking fluency activities for ESL students to help them communicate better in English. You can use the activities as warm-ups, fillers, and whenever you feel that your students (and you!) need them.

1. Small talk

speaking homework esl

Used every day by people all over the world, small talk or a quick chat is a great way to practise fluency, revise and make students feel more confident about speaking English. It can be used with students on all levels and repeated regularly in different forms. You can simply ask your students how their weekend was, or how they’ve been, but you could also choose a couple of questions from the list below to make the classroom small talk more varied. Ask follow-up questions and encourage other students to do so, too.

  • Do you like the weather today? / Is it too cold or too hot for you? / Do you think it’ll rain?
  • What were three things you did before the lesson? / Did you have to rush to get here on time?
  • What time did you get up this morning? / What time do you think you’ll go to bed tonight?
  • What have you eaten today? / Who have you talked to today?
  • What’s the most exciting thing you have done today? / How has your day been so far?
  • What’s the most boring thing you need to do this week? / What are you looking forward to this week?
  • What have you heard on the news lately?
  • Have you seen any good films recently? / Have you seen any funny videos on YouTube?
  • Have you spoken, watched or read anything in English since our last lesson?
  • What five words or phrases can you remember from our last lesson? What do they mean or when do we use them?

If you want your students to practise small talk more, check out our lesson plan on small talk .

speaking homework esl

Visual aids are not only a great prompt for speaking, but they also make the lesson more interactive and engaging. Regardless of the students’ level, they are a valuable tool for practising speaking. There are numerous websites where you can generate random pictures (like here or here ) and use them to make your students talk. Apart from the obvious ‘describe the picture’ part, use the set of questions below to make the task more interesting or more appropriate for high-level students. The questions work with any picture, and develop not only speaking fluency, but also the ability to think critically in English.

  • Why was the photo taken/the picture made?
  • Where would you expect to see it?
  • Would you set it as the wallpaper on your computer?
  • What feelings does it evoke in you?
  • Would you change anything in it to make it more interesting?
  • Have you ever taken a similar photo/made a similar picture?

Do you think your students could benefit from such speaking fluency activities? In this lesson for lower-level students you will find tasks to help with picture description, and at the end of this lesson for advanced students you will find sets of photos with extra questions.

3. Would you rather…?

speaking homework esl

An oldie but a goodie. Everybody likes talking about their preferences, and as teachers we can use this fact to get our students talking. The rule here is that students must explain why they prefer something over something else, because that is when production happens. Use the examples below, and once your students get the gist of the activity, ask them to prepare more of the ‘Would you rather’ questions in pairs. Give them a theme: holidays, work, lifestyle, possessions, extremes, etc. They can then answer other students’ questions.

Would you rather…?

  • visit the Sahara or Antarctica
  • spend a week without your phone or sleeping on the floor
  • be the richest person in the world or the most beautiful person in the world
  • study physics or literature
  • be a shop assistant or a doctor
  • live by the beach or in the mountains
  • celebrate your birthday every week or never celebrate it again
  • live right next to a stadium or an airport
  • be too busy or be bored
  • be able to breathe underwater or fly

4. Don’t stop talking

speaking homework esl

This is one of the best speaking fluency activities for ESL students to use if your lower-level learners still don’t feel comfortable speaking English. The purpose is to let them have a simple conversation with a partner, without worrying about accuracy, and enjoy the fact that they are able to communicate in a foreign language . Put your students in pairs and tell them they will talk about a topic you give them for two minutes. Tell them the point is to keep the conversation going, and that they can say whatever comes into their mind. That means they can share their own opinions and experience, but also ask their partner questions. You, the teacher, want to hear them speak English and that’s all you ask.

Some possible topics for the two-minute conversations include: weekends, food, films, pets, birthdays, shopping, family, cities, travelling, school. If you want to make it more interesting, choose some of these less obvious topics: carrots, socks, dolphins, dentists, headphones, windows, jars, islands, queues, coffee.

5. Is it something we have in common?

speaking homework esl

This simple activity creates lots of opportunities for students to ask questions. The following are some examples of what you might say to your students about yourself. You can obviously adapt the sentences so that they are true for you.

  • I always listen to classical music in the car.
  • I have four pairs of trousers.
  • There is a lamp in the corner of my bedroom.
  • I’ve had two cups of tea today.
  • I finish work at 7 on Thursdays.
  • I went abroad twice last year.
  • I can make lasagne and sushi.
  • I was at a friend’s birthday party last weekend.

After hearing or reading one of your sentences, students talk in pairs or groups to establish if it is something you and they have in common. It probably isn’t, so they will get one minute to modify the statement so that it is true for the three of them. This will require either asking their partners questions (e.g. Where do you listen to music? Do you listen to classical music? Do you always listen to something in the car?), or talking about their own experience, e.g. of listening to music and going places by car, until the other students decide that it is also true for them. (There might be students who, once they realize a sentence is untrue for all of them, will simply turn it into a negative, or change the beginning to ‘My English teacher…’. Make sure they know that is not what the activity is about.)

If you want your students to practise asking questions more, have a look at this lesson plan .Fluent speaking is arguably the most desirable skill for English learners. At ESL Brains , we always try to give it priority in the lessons we design, but it ultimately depends on you, the teacher, how much speaking practice your students are given. How do you create speaking opportunities in the lesson? Which of the no-prep speaking fluency activities for ESL students will you use to help your students communicate better in English?

Read other teaching tips posts

speaking homework esl

How to make the most of group activities in one-to-one classes

speaking homework esl

How teaching with authentic materials benefits your students

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ESL Brains Critical Reading Club

speaking homework esl

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speaking homework esl

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vocabulary revision exercises

Six no- and low-prep vocabulary revision exercises which make students think in English

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Great tips! I often use them during my classes!

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Me too 🙂 It’s amazing to see how quickly simple activities like these give students confidence in speaking.

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Thanks for the inspiration! It’s always nice to have a few fresh ideas, or even just a reminder to dust off some classic, well-loved activities too. 🙂

I know. We sometimes do so much lesson prep that we forget that some simple ideas can be really effective.

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I have a student who really struggles with any kind of conversation about herself. We often use photos of individuals and groups, and I ask leading questions about them. She has opened up tremendously, and I can now sneak in questions about her, as well. She’s really responding well to this.

I like the idea of asking her to talk about other people first, then about herself. Sounds like you’ve really helped her.

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Thank you for these brilliant ideas!!! They ll boost my worming ups and some conversation courses too!!!

Thanks! I’m glad to hear it 🙂

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Great tips! My students had lots of fun with them!

Thanks, Stephanie. It’s good to hear your students enjoyed them 🙂

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Beginning ESL students working on a writing homework assignment

Homework for Beginning ESL Students: 8 Tips for Success

Homework can be a controversial subject . Some schools and teachers are strongly in favor of it, others are strongly against it, and many fall somewhere in the middle. But, when it comes to ESL students and other English learners , homework can offer ways to extend learning outside of the classroom and encourage independent English reading, speaking, writing, and listening at home. Here are our tips for making homework for beginning ESL students a positive and productive experience.

  • 1. Keep it Brief

One of the keys to ESL homework success is to keep it as short and simple as possible. The goal should not be for students to spend hours on an assignment that may confuse and frustrate them. Instead, the main goal should simply be to practice and reinforce classroom learning.

There is also no rule stating that you have to assign homework for English language learners every day. Consider homework on an ad hoc basis , and only assign it on days when you have truly meaningful assignments, rather than as a given every single day. You can also send home a folder of fun English activities for students to complete for extra credit at any point in the year. This encourages learning at home while offering flexible options for families.

Whatever you choose to assign for homework, make sure that you are providing adequate scaffolding so that your ELLs will succeed. For newcomers, you may want to modify the assignment by giving them extra visuals , adapting the text to their language level, or writing directions in bullet points rather than paragraphs. Consider using writing prompts or sentence frames to support and guide your students in their writing.

2. Get to Know Your Students’ Families

The more you know about your students’ lives at home, the easier assigning reasonable and relevant homework for English language learners will be. Some students may have access to a computer and English-speaking relatives, while others may have neither.

As much as possible, have homework directions and explanations translated into the native language of the ESL student. Keep in mind that parents of ELLs likely speak another language, so it may be difficult for them to help their child with a homework assignment in English.

Once you get to know your students’ families, you can often offer better advice to help parents and their students succeed with homework. Reinforce that:

  • Using their native language is important for their child’s second language development and should be encouraged.
  • They can help their child, but shouldn’t do the homework for them. There is no benefit to homework being completed unless the child is learning by doing it themselves.
  • Homework is an important part of learning and a responsibility of their child.
  • They should feel comfortable coming to you at any time if they are struggling to help their child with homework or have any concerns relating to their child’s assignments.

An ESL's parent helps him with a homework assignment on the computer.

  • 3. Offer Flexibility

As you’re getting to know your students and their families, creating flexible homework assignments is essential. Here are some simple tips for making homework success more accessible:

  • Provide several days (or the entire week) to complete an assignment.
  • Allow students to choose between several readings or assignments to cater to their interests and help them build confidence.
  • Send home bilingual books so children can read in English and parents can follow along or read in their native language.
  • Send home supplies like markers or glue sticks that students may need for their assignments.
  • Provide open-ended homework assignments, like listening to something on StorylineOnline.net .
  • 4. Assess for Completion, Not Accuracy

The goal in assigning homework for beginning ESL students should not be total comprehension or mastery. That means that for many classes, assessing or monitoring for accuracy isn’t the best use of your time and can be discouraging to new students who are trying their best to grasp a whole new language.

Assessing for completion is the best option for most newcomer ESL students. It allows you to keep track of how students are doing and gauge their progress and parental involvement at home. And you can always have students turn in assignments and take your own private notes on their accuracy, even while assessing for completion publicly.

  • 5. Make Homework Hard to Forget

Oftentimes, homework for English language learners may be incomplete because the student wasn’t clear on what exactly needed to be done. In addition to verbally assigning homework, write down any assignments and consider using a brightly colored stamp to denote homework assignments.

You can also opt to send home a “homework packet” full of ESL homework ideas every week that contains all of the assignments that need to be completed during the week. While it will take some additional preparation, this provides a flexible option that allows time for questions and may result in a higher completion rate when parents have time to help students with their assignments.

  • 6. Create Meaningful Assignments

Colorin Colorado shares that “Recent meta-analyses have shown that educational programs that systematically incorporate use of ELLs’ home language result in levels of academic success , including achievement in literacy and other academic subjects, that are as high as and often better than that of ELLs in English-only programs (Genesee & Lindholm-Leary, in press).” When assigning homework for beginning ESL students, make sure you support students in using their native language. Encourage parents to read aloud to their children in their home language— research shows that strong native language literacy supports second language development .

Another part of providing flexibility with homework for beginning ESL students is allowing them to discover the subjects and topics they enjoy. Especially in the early days of learning a new language, learning vocabulary and choosing reading and writing assignments related to your students’ personal interests can be a big motivator.

If you assign at-home reading for ESL students, allow students to choose from several high-interest books that are on their language level. Consider sharing audio books or other resources for students to listen to stories, if possible.

  • 7. Use Homework as Preparation for Class

Because of the individuality of language learning and the differences in parental involvement , homework for beginning ESL students typically isn’t a valuable tool for developing mastery. The best homework for ESL practice is typically an assignment that prepares students for in-class activities and maximizes your effectiveness in the classroom.

Try some of these ESL homework ideas to make the most of your time in the classroom:

  • Preview a text for the next day’s class.
  • Review a vocabulary sheet for a text for the next day’s class.
  • Practice pronunciation and reading aloud in preparation for oral reading fluency.
  • Review a rough draft and make edits in preparation for finalizing a writing piece in class.
  • Add unknown words identified in class to your vocabulary notebook .

An English learner review homework assignments with her father.

  • 8. Encourage a Homework Routine

Part of assigning homework for beginning ESL students is helping them build good homework habits as they progress and as homework may become more intensive or time-consuming.

Here are some tips to pass along to parents to help students find their focus at home :

  • Create a schedule and do homework at the same time every day. Attaching it to an existing habit can help create consistency (e.g. having a snack and then doing homework).
  • Provide a space for students to do their homework that has the supplies they’ll need. This can be anything from a desk in their room to a spot in the kitchen.
  • Put screens and distractions away—consider them a reward for when homework is finished.
  • Develop an order to create a routine. If the child needs motivation, start with their favorite subject. If they’re naturally driven to complete homework, start with the hardest assignment to get it over with.

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Language-centered ESL activities for students with limited English ability help develop vocabulary and life skills necessary to communicate effectively with others.

Thank you to Melissa Miller, an ESOL teacher in Howard County, Maryland for consulting on this blog post. This blog was originally published on October 1, 2021. It was updated on February 3, 2023.

  • 2. Get to Know Your Students' Families

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ESL Speaking

Games + Activities to Try Out Today!

in Activities for Adults · Activities for Kids · ESL Speaking Resources

Describing Games and Activities ESL | Describe People & Things

If you’re looking for some of the best describing games, then you’re certainly in the right place. Stay tuned for the best describe the word ESL activities, along with lesson plans, worksheets and more.

describing-words-games

Describe games

Describe Games and Activities

Let’s get into the best describing words games for English learners.

#1: Describing Words Board Game

In real life, I love to play board games which is why I like to bring some into my classroom as well. It’s easy to make your own for just about topic, grammatical point or vocabulary set, including describing words.

In this case, fill the board with common objects that students might know. Then, when they land on that square, they have to say 1-3 (depending on the level) words or statements about that object. For example, pencil:

  • It’s made of wood.
  • A pencil is hard.
  • It has a sharp point.

If the student can come up with the required words/statements, they get to stay on that spot. Find out more about how to make your own ESL board games:

www.eslspeaking.org/esl-board-games

#2: Speaking Bingo Describing Activity

A nice way to give students some practice with describing things is to play this speaking Bingo game. Regular Bingo is fun but it doesn’t have a lot of educational value to it. Instead of just saying the word, I like to describe it instead to make it a more challenging listening activity, as well as vocabulary one.

Better yet, it’s possible to have students describe the words instead of you! Try it out:

www.eslspeaking.org/esl-speaking-bingo

#3: Using Relative Clauses to Describe Things or People

Using a relative clause (He is a person who…) or a reduced relative clause (This is the man I saw…) to describe people or things is very common. In this activity, students have to give hints to other people in their group about a secret object or person. The other students have to guess who or what is it.

Have a look here to find out more:

www.eslspeaking.org/relative-clause-speaking-activity

#4: ESL Comparatives Quiz

Comparative adjectives are a nice way to describe a lot of things! Have a look at this simple online quiz to try out with your students:

#5: Guessing Game Warm-Up

This is a simple party game that I’m sure you’ve played before. You get a sticky note with a secret person or thing on it and then have to ask questions to the other people at the party to try to figure out what it is.

To work on describing things, I play this game with a bit of a twist. Instead of asking questions, I get people to give hints to the person. For example, someone might have Barrack Obama at their secret person. They could give hints such as:

  • He’s American
  • He’s a politician
  • He was a former president

Try it out with your students:

www.eslspeaking.org/describe-something-guessing-game

#6: Taboo Describe Game

Here’s another party game that you may have played before. Traditionally, there is a secret word that you have to describe but you can’t use a list of other closely related words.

I’ve adapted it for my English learners to make it slightly easier. They still have to describe a secret word but I don’t use the banned list of related words. Find out more here:

www.eslspeaking.org/esl-speaking-game-for-kids-adults

p.s. It can be super helpful to laminate the words to recycle from class to class. Here are some top options: Best laminators. 

#7: Just a Minute

If you want to challenge your students, try out this speaking activity. Bring some different objects into the classroom and put students into pairs. Take out the first object and set a timer for one minute. One person in each group has to describe the object for one minute without stopping. Then, use a different object and the other person tries the same task.

It’s also possible to do this activity without objects but instead use things like:

  • Favourite thing
  • Most delicious food

Have a look here for more information:

www.eslspeaking.org/just-a-minute-game-esl-speaking

#8: Hot Potato Describe Game

This is a fun game to try out if you want to inject some excitement into the classroom. Students pass around the potato (or another object) until the timer goes off or the music stops. Whoever is holding the potato when this happens has to do a task of some kind.

In this case, show the student a flashcard or other object and have them make 1-3 statements (depending on the level) to describe the object. For example, a cat.

  • It’s black and white.
  • It has soft fur.
  • It looks sleepy.

Find out more about this fun ESL game here:

www.eslspeaking.org/hot-potato-esl-speaking-game-for-kids

#9: Word Association

This activity is a nice way to focus on word families. Have a look here for all the details:

#10: Puzzle Finder Activity

This is a fun ESL speaking and listening activity that focuses on teamwork as well as describing common vocabulary words. It’s a flexible activity that can be adapted to many different kinds of things. Basically, students have to describe their puzzle pieces to others to help decide if they have a match. Check it out:

www.eslspeaking.org/puzzle-finder-esl-ice-breaker

#11: TOEIC Speaking Test: Describe the Picture

Most English proficiency speaking tests have a section where students have to describe a picture of some kind. There is certainly specific vocabulary related to this that can help our students get the best possible score. If I’m teaching students who are likely to take these kinds of tests in the future, I like to teach them how to describe a picture by doing some sample tests. Here are a few to try out:

www.eslspeaking.org/toeic-speaking-mini-tests

#12: Current Events Presentation Project

With some of my more advanced students, I like to do a current events presentation project. It’s challenging because students often have to learn a bunch of new vocabulary words that they may not be familiar with because they often aren’t found in ESL textbooks.

As part of the project, they have to describe the event and then talk about why it’s important. It’s a describing activity but of a different sort than most of the other ones on this list. Try it out and I think you’ll like the results as much as I did:

www.eslspeaking.org/current-events-presentation-project

#13: Describing Places

A common topic that involves lots of adjectives and descriptions is for places. For example, describing a city. Here are some of the best ideas for this popular unit that is found in most ESL textbooks:

www.eslspeaking.org/teaching-places

#14: Song for Describing People

When I teach kids, I always like to use some songs and chants in my classes. They help make grammar and vocabulary far more memorable and I sometimes even catch students singing along to them between classes. This always makes me feel like I’ve done a good thing!

Have a look on YouTube and you’ll be able to easily find something for the age and level of students that you teach.

#15: ESL Adjective Games and Activities

Using adjectives are necessary for describing things. Here are some of the best ESL adjective activities to consider trying out:

www.eslspeaking.org/esl-adjective-games

#16: What are you Cooking? (Describing Food)

This is an engaging 4-skills ESL activity that’s perfect for adults. Students have to make a 3-course menu from ingredients chosen by another group. Then, they have to make a presentation to try to convince others that their menu is the best. This is where descriptive words come in! Have a look here to find out more:

https://eslspeaking.org/what-are-you-cooking-4-skills-esl-activity/

#17: English Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

These kinds of adjectives are very helpful for describing just about anything. A comparative compares two things (The dog is bigger than the cat) while a superlative talks about only one thing (That’s the fluffiest cat in my neighbourhood). There are lots of interesting comparative/superlative activities to try out with your students:

www.eslspeaking.org/esl-comparative-superlative-activities

#18: Describe and Draw a Picture

This is a fun activity for kids as well as adults that usually has some hilarious results. It’s for describing people ESL. Find some pictures of monsters or aliens. Then, one student has to describe what they see to the other student who has to draw it. When they’re done, they can compare the two pictures. Find out more:

www.eslspeaking.org/draw-a-picture

describe-word-game

Describe the word game

#19: Picture Prompt

This is a nice warmer activity or to use as a review at the end of class. Find an interesting picture that has a number of target vocabulary words. Then, elicit some of those from the students. What you can do with this depends on the level of the students. Beginners may say a single word while more advanced students can make sentences. Or, even write a story based on what they see. Check out all the options:

www.eslspeaking.org/picture-prompt

#20: Flip-Chart Vocabulary Review Describe Game

This is a fun review game that helps students practice describing the word. The first team chooses one person to be in the hot seat. Then, the team has to describe the secret words to that person who guesses what it is. They try to get as many words as possible in a minute. I generally allow one pass per round. I play 3-5 rounds with different people in the hot seat. Have a look here for more information:

www.eslspeaking.org/vocabulary-review-game-for-kids-and-adults

#21: Postcards ESL Writing Activity

On a postcard, people often describe places or events. Check out this simple activity:

#22: Show and Tell

This isn’t just for kids! Show and Tell is a fun ESL activity for all ages. I have students bring in one of their favourite things or a picture/PowerPoint slide if it’s too big. Then, they have to describe to the class about their thing in 1-2 minutes. After that, I have a question/answer time. It’s fun and interesting to see a bit about the student’s hobbies or home life. More information here:

#23: Dictogloss

This is a challenging listening activity for higher-level students. Find (or write) a passage filled with lots of descriptive words. It might be someone talking about their hometown, or their favourite hobby.

Then, put students into pairs and read it out at a faster than normal pace. Students have to take notes and then try to recreate what they heard. Read it again and students do the same thing. After that, they can compare what they have with the original. Find out more details here:

www.eslspeaking.org/dictogloss-esl-activity

#24: Describing Yourself Toiler Paper Icebreaker

You’ve maybe done this icebreaker activity before? You have to take a certain number of toilet paper squares and then say a true statement about yourself for each one that you have. I like to mix things up a bit and allow some follow-up questions too. Check it out:

www.eslspeaking.org/ice-breaker-speaking-activity

#25: ESL Clothes Quiz

Try out this fun game that describes clothes:

#26: I’m an Alien

This is a fun describe game that you can use with kids. Pretend that you’re an alien from another planet and don’t know anything about happens on Earth. Students have to tell you everything you need to know to survive. To focus on describing words, pretend that you don’t know what basic things and students have to describe these things to you. Try out this fun ESL activity:

www.eslspeaking.org/im-an-alien-an-esl-speaking-activity-for-kids

#27: ESL Describing Game

Write down 10-20 words randomly on the whiteboard (more ideas here: Whiteboard Activities ). They should be related to a certain topic that you want to review (sports, animals, food, etc.). Then, put students into pairs and the first student has to choose a word and describe it to their partner. When their partner guesses, they switch roles and play again.

describing-words-games

Games where you describe a word.

#28: Five Senses Vocabulary Activity

Try out this versatile activity that can be done either through speaking or listening and alone or in groups. Bring in a common object like an orange and then students have to think of descriptive words related to the 5 senses to describe the object. It’s challenging but fun and I think your students will enjoy it as much as mine do! Find out more:

5 Senses ESL Vocabulary Activity

#29: ESL Fruit and Vegetable Quiz

Check out this simple online quiz that describes fruit and veggies:

#30: Mystery Box

Place an object inside a box without showing it to the students. Describe the object using adjectives, size, shape, and other relevant details. Students then guess what the object is based on the description.

#31: Descriptive Bingo

Create Bingo cards with various adjectives. Call out different nouns, and students mark the corresponding adjectives that could be used to describe those nouns on their cards.

#32: Describe the Odd One Out

Show students a group of objects, with one that doesn’t belong based on certain criteria (e.g., size, color, purpose). Students describe why they think the odd one out is different.

#33: Travel Brochure

Assign students a country or city and have them create a travel brochure describing the attractions, culture, and experiences using descriptive language.

#34: Describing Role Play

Prepare cards with roles or occupations. Students draw a card and take on that role while describing their daily routine or work using relevant vocabulary.

#35: Descriptive Story Writing

Provide a prompt or an opening sentence for a story. Students take turns adding sentences, focusing on using descriptive language to bring the story to life.

#36: Adjective Scavenger Hunt

Give students a list of adjectives. They walk around the classroom or school, finding objects that match each adjective and then describing them.

Describing Words Worksheets

Describing worksheets are perfect for an in-class assignment or for homework. Here are some of the best ones to consider:

English Worksheets

ISL Collective

Describing Words Lesson Plans

If you’re a teacher, then you’ll know what a huge time-saver it can be to have ready-made lesson plans at your fingertips. Here are some of the best ESL describing lesson plans to check out:

Lingua House

Your Dictionary

Teaching Description Words FAQs

There are a number of common questions that people have about teaching words to describe things. Here are the answers to some of the most popular ones.

What are describing words?

Describing words, also known as adjectives, provide information about nouns by adding details like color, size, shape, and more.

How do you teach adjectives effectively?

Use real-life objects, pictures, and examples to demonstrate how adjectives modify nouns and make sentences more descriptive.

What’s a simple way to introduce adjectives?

Start with basic adjectives like “big,” “small,” “happy,” and “sad.” Show objects and ask students to describe them using these words.

Can you give an example of using describing words in a sentence?

“The tall giraffe ate the green leaves.”

What’s a good way to expand students’ adjective vocabulary?

Create word banks with related adjectives (e.g., synonyms for “happy” – joyful, delighted) to help students choose varied words.

Can songs or rhymes help teach descriptive words?

Incorporate songs that use descriptive words. Rhymes can make learning adjectives more engaging and memorable.

What’s the importance of teaching description words?

Description words enhance language by adding depth and detail. Teaching them helps students express themselves more vividly.

How can I encourage students to use adjectives in their writing?

Assign creative writing tasks that require them to incorporate a certain number of adjectives, encouraging them to think creatively.

How do you teach the order of multiple adjectives before a noun?

Teach the sequence: Opinion, Size, Age, Shape, Color, Origin, Material, Noun (OSASCOMP). For example, “a beautiful, large, old book.”

Can descriptive words be used in sentences without nouns?

Yes, descriptive words can stand alone in sentences to express opinions or feelings, like “Interesting!” or “Great!”

Did you like these ESL Describe Games?

39 ESL Vocabulary Activities: For English Teachers of Teenagers and Adults Who Want to Make...

  • Amazon Kindle Edition
  • Bolen, Jackie (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 57 Pages - 10/26/2015 (Publication Date)

Then you’re going to love this book over on Amazon: 39 ESL Vocabulary Activities for Teenagers and Adults . The key to better English classes is a wide variety of interactive, engaging and student-centred activities and games and this book will help you get there in style.

Pick up a copy of 39 ESL Vocabulary Activities to keep on the bookshelf in your office to use as a handy reference guide. Or, take the digital version with you to your favourite coffee shop for some lesson planning on the go. Whatever the case, get ready for some ESL teaching awesome in your life,

Head over to Amazon to find out more about the book today:

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Have your say about these Describing Games and Activities

What’s your top pick for a describe the word game or activity? Is it one of the options from this list or do you have your eye on another one? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear from you.

Also be sure to give this article a share on Facebook, Pinterest, or Twitter. It’ll help other busy English teachers, like yourself, find this useful resource?

Last update on 2024-04-25 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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About Jackie

Jackie Bolen has been teaching English for more than 15 years to students in South Korea and Canada. She's taught all ages, levels and kinds of TEFL classes. She holds an MA degree, along with the Celta and Delta English teaching certifications.

Jackie is the author of more than 100 books for English teachers and English learners, including 101 ESL Activities for Teenagers and Adults and 1001 English Expressions and Phrases . She loves to share her ESL games, activities, teaching tips, and more with other teachers throughout the world.

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Sam needs help with his homework.

Instructions

Do the preparation exercise first. Then watch the video and follow the instructions to practise your speaking.

Preparation

Makayla: Hi Sam. How are you? Sam: Oh … Hi Makayla. I’m fine. Makayla: What’s up? Sam: Well, I haven’t done my French and maths homework … and I don’t know what to do. Makayla: Oh, don’t worry. I’ll help you … OK … For French, write an email to your French friend about your weekend … and for … Sam: Stop! Stop! Wait a minute. Can you say that again? Makayla: OK. Write an email to your French friend. Sam: Write an email … OK. Makayla: Yes … about your weekend. Sam: Do you mean a special weekend? Makayla: No, no. Just a typical weekend … you know … what you normally do at the weekend. Sam: OK. And for maths? Makayla: For maths … erm … it’s pages 27 and 28 from the book and revise everything for the exam next week. Sam: Hang on! Can you repeat that? Makayla: Yeah. Pages 27 and 28 from the book and revise for the exam. Sam: Exam? What exam? Makayla: You know, the end of term exam? It’s next Tuesday! Sam: Ohhh … OK, thanks a lot, Makayla!

Makayla: Hi Sam. How are you? Sam: Oh … Hi Makayla. I’m f___. Makayla: What’s up? Sam: Well, I haven’t done my French and maths homework … and I d___ k___ what to d__. Makayla: Oh, don’t worry. I’ll help you … OK … For French, write an email to your French friend about your weekend … and for … Sam: Stop! Stop! Wait a m_____. Can you s__ that a____? Makayla: OK. Write an email to your French friend. Sam: Write an email … OK. Makayla: Yes … about your weekend. Sam: D__ y__ mean a special weekend? Makayla: No, no. Just a typical weekend … you know … what you normally do at the weekend. Sam: OK. And for maths? Makayla: For maths … erm … it’s pages 27 and 28 from the book and revise everything for the exam next week. Sam: Hang on! Can you r_____ t___? Makayla: Yeah. Pages 27 and 28 from the book and revise for the exam. Sam: Exam? W___ exam? Makayla: You know, the end of term exam? It’s next Tuesday! Sam: Ohhh … OK, t_____ a l__, Makayla!

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English lessons for kids

21 Apr / 2014

Futurama-Episode-113--Fry-and-the-Slurm-Factory

Back to my philosophy: I don’t care what we are doing or what we are talking about, as long as it’s in English.

Building lessons for older children as I’ve said can be challenging.  I want to engage them. I want them to learn, even if they don’t.  I find inspiration from my own struggles to learn a foreign language.

I love cartoons, especially those for adults like Simpsons, Family Guy and Futurama.  I’ve watched every episode several times.  When I started learning Russian, I watched those same episodes in Russian with Russian subtitles.  Through my own memory and context of the show, I quickly learned new vocabulary and sentence structure.  Even better, it was real language (as opposed to the kind that only exist in textbooks).

I was thrilled when my student said he was crazy about Futurama too. I was even more thrilled as I started searching the internet and found other ESL teachers who had made worksheets from the show.

From Season 1 episode – Space Pilot 3000, which can be found streaming at  www.free-tv-video-online.me

speaking homework esl

This also introduces the conversation starter

What will the future be like?

What will the future be like in 50 years? What will our computers look like? How will we use our phones? How will we make food at home? Will we have flying cars?  What else? What kind of robots will we have? Where will travel in space? What will schools be like? Will we still use books? What will our houses look like? What will the music sound like? What will people wear?

Children have a knack for predicting the future , after all they are the ones creating it.  Take a look at the future of computing .

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  4. COM 241 homework

  5. Public Speaking homework 2

  6. Speaking

COMMENTS

  1. 12 Fun ESL Speaking Activities for Teens or Adults

    12. Story Chain. 1. Interview Pop. Student level: Pre-Intermediate to Advanced. Type of Lesson: Group or Individual. This is a great one for students to have fun and be creative. Put students in pairs, or you could also carry this one out in a one-one lesson. Students choose one person they want to interview.

  2. 13 Entertaining ESL Homework Ideas to Keep Your Students Engaged

    12. Analyze a Song. Music is great for English learners since it stresses many aspects of language that can otherwise be hard to isolate, like the emotion of language, intonation and stress. Have students choose their favorite English language song to listen to for homework and then ask them to do the following:

  3. 35 ESL Speaking Activities: Engage with Fun for Better Fluency

    Provides a fun and interactive way for students to practice their question-asking and answering skills. Helps students get to know each other, fostering a sense of community in the class. Encourages movement and active learning. Builds confidence in speaking as students interact directly with their peers.

  4. Outside-the-box ESL homework ideas

    Lower-level students often struggle to start speaking English, first in the classroom, then outside of it. To help them open up and get accustomed to using the language in different situations, their homework could be going to a café and ordering something.They could also ask someone for directions, or have a chat with an English-speaking colleague.

  5. 10 entertaining homework ideas for online English Language Learners

    Here are 10 fun and entertaining homework ideas for your ESL students: Cafe hopper. Tiktok star. Let's go to the movies. Hello Mr. Teacher. Interview a stranger. Shine like a Karaoke star. Expert on the loose. 24 hour challenge.

  6. Homework for ESL Students

    These ESL homework ideas are designed to enhance language learning and engage students both in and out of the classroom: Daily journaling, vocabulary flashcards, reading comprehension, listening to podcasts/songs, video diaries, role-play scenarios, grammar worksheets, online games, book club discussions, and a pen pal program.

  7. 15 Speaking Projects And Activities For ESL Students

    ESL Exam Preparation Material. Some students are hugely motivated by doing well in exams such as the IELTS test, and IGCSE ESL speaking tests. Exam boards for tests such as these produce a plethora of practise material that is often available for free online and ready to be use.

  8. 11 Time-Saving & Engaging ESL Homework Ideas

    11 ESL Homework Ideas . So there you have it - 11 engaging ESL homework ideas that your students will actually want to do outside of class! As you can see, these ESL homework ideas are a million miles away from the types of boring worksheets that you had to fill in for language classes at school.

  9. 15 Of The Best ESL Speaking Games And Activities.

    it is a fun and engaging English speaking game that tests questioning knowledge. 11. Call My Bluff / Two Truths and A Lie. This is a similar game to the Make a Wish game above, but Call My Bluff is a more difficult and fun game which is perfect at the start of term as a 'getting to know you' kind of game.

  10. 23 ESL Speaking Activities for Adults: Free Their Inner Kids

    Conversation Class Lesson Plan: A Step-by-Step Guide for Lively English Classes ». ESL activities for adults are a great way to build your students' speaking confidence. Read this guide to find out about 23 great activities, including "Sentence Auction," "Video Dictionary," "Running Dictation," "News Brief" and more.

  11. Speaking Worksheets

    Students interview each other, and perhaps teacher. Watch for trick questions. Clearly no-one in the class has "gone" to London. WH- Question Practice - Teacher or pair student asks student to pose various WH- questions. Practical speaking worksheets for the ESL teacher. Free printables for use in the English classroom or for homework.

  12. Great homework ideas for ESL students

    1. Ask general comprehension questions on the video. 2. Re-create the story as a class, eliciting it from students piece by piece with the help of key words from the story as prompts on the board. Alternatively divide the class into A and B. For homework, A's watch one video and B's another.

  13. ESL Conversation Activities for Adults: Top 25

    Adults like a nice mix of old and new, so add in a new activity or two to each lesson. There are a ton of ESL speaking activities for adults, so get creative #7: Ask Students if They Want Homework in Conversation Classes for Adults. Adults usually have very different expectations about things like homework when they're studying English.

  14. Five no-prep speaking fluency activities for ESL students

    be too busy or be bored. be able to breathe underwater or fly. 4. Don't stop talking. This is one of the best speaking fluency activities for ESL students to use if your lower-level learners still don't feel comfortable speaking English. The purpose is to let them have a simple conversation with a partner, without worrying about accuracy ...

  15. Homework for Beginning ESL Students

    But, when it comes to ESL students and other English learners, homework can offer ways to extend learning outside of the classroom and encourage independent English reading, speaking, writing, and listening at home. Here are our tips for making homework for beginning ESL students a positive and productive experience. 1. Keep it Brief

  16. Describing Word Games and Activities for ESL

    This is a fun ESL speaking and listening activity that focuses on teamwork as well as describing common vocabulary words. It's a flexible activity that can be adapted to many different kinds of things. ... Describing worksheets are perfect for an in-class assignment or for homework. Here are some of the best ones to consider: English ...

  17. 10 ESL Homework Ideas and ESL Writing Projects

    Here at Twinkl, we've compiled a list of 10 ESL homework ideas and writing projects to try with your students. From practising their English skills to sharing their native language, you're sure to find something to suit your pupils' needs. A presentation or report on their country or language. Teach the rest of the class how to count to ...

  18. Homework problems

    Worksheets and downloads. Homework problems - exercises 213.31 KB. Homework problems - answers 190.09 KB. Homework problems - transcript 198.8 KB.

  19. Story Cubes

    Story Cubes are awesome for teaching English. Great conversation starters. But opening the box and looking at your student and telling them, Tell Me a STORY is a bit overwhelming. I haven't had a student that felt comfortable which such a big task. So here are some alternative ways to play with the cubes. Pick 2

  20. Future-ama

    Back to my philosophy: I don't care what we are doing or what we are talking about, as long as it's in English. Building lessons for older children as I've said can be challenging. I want to engage them. I want them to learn, even if they don't. I find inspiration from my own struggles to learn a foreign language.

  21. American Center (@KrasnodarCenter)

    The latest Tweets from American Center (@KrasnodarCenter). American Center of Krasnodar is a leading English language school with native speaking teachers. http://t ...

  22. More than 500 AI Models Run Optimized on Intel Core Ultra Processors

    Why It Matters: Surpassing 500 AI models is a landmark moment for Intel's efforts to nurture and support the AI PC transformation.Not only is the Intel Core Ultra processor the fastest-growing AI PC processor to date — selling more units in a single quarter than competing processors in all of 2023 — it is also the most robust platform for AI PC development, with more AI models ...

  23. AMERICAN CENTER OF KRASNODAR: English Language Services

    The American Center of Krasnodar is located at ul.Karasunskaya Naberezhnaya, 73/1, in downtown Krasnodar, Russia. The American Center is an Educational and Cultural center started by Thomas Horan, an American citizen living in the southern Russian city of Krasnodar. The American Center provides English lessons both in group or individual format, with native language teachers.

  24. What Ralph Waldo Emerson Knew About Money

    Essay. What Ralph Waldo Emerson Knew About Money The great American thinker was able to write his shimmering essays thanks to a healthy income from dividends and speaking fees.

  25. East and Southern Africa: Journalists targeted amid ongoing crackdown

    Speaking out against or scrutinising government policies, actions or inaction, or publicly sharing information deemed damaging to the government carried the risk of arrest, arbitrary detention, or death," said Tigere Chagutah, Amnesty International's Regional Director for East and Southern Africa.