Food Research International - Impact Score, Ranking, SJR, h-index, Citescore, Rating, Publisher, ISSN, and Other Important Details

Published By: Elsevier Ltd.

Abbreviation: Food Res. Int.

Impact Score The impact Score or journal impact score (JIS) is equivalent to Impact Factor. The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly mean number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal, as indexed by Clarivate's Web of Science. On the other hand, Impact Score is based on Scopus data.

Important details, about food research international.

Food Research International is a journal published by Elsevier Ltd. . This journal covers the area[s] related to Food Science, etc . The coverage history of this journal is as follows: 1992-2022. The rank of this journal is 2506 . This journal's impact score, h-index, and SJR are 8.96, 195, and 1.360, respectively. The ISSN of this journal is/are as follows: 09639969 . The best quartile of Food Research International is Q1 . This journal has received a total of 24113 citations during the last three years (Preceding 2022).

Food Research International Impact Score 2022-2023

The impact score (IS), also denoted as the Journal impact score (JIS), of an academic journal is a measure of the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is based on Scopus data.

Prediction of Food Research International Impact Score 2023

Impact Score 2022 of Food Research International is 8.96 . If a similar upward trend continues, IS may increase in 2023 as well.

Impact Score Graph

Check below the impact score trends of food research international. this is based on scopus data., food research international h-index.

The h-index of Food Research International is 195 . By definition of the h-index, this journal has at least 195 published articles with more than 195 citations.

What is h-index?

The h-index (also known as the Hirsch index or Hirsh index) is a scientometric parameter used to evaluate the scientific impact of the publications and journals. It is defined as the maximum value of h such that the given Journal has published at least h papers and each has at least h citations.

Food Research International ISSN

The International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) of Food Research International is/are as follows: 09639969 .

The ISSN is a unique 8-digit identifier for a specific publication like Magazine or Journal. The ISSN is used in the postal system and in the publishing world to identify the articles that are published in journals, magazines, newsletters, etc. This is the number assigned to your article by the publisher, and it is the one you will use to reference your article within the library catalogues.

ISSN code (also called as "ISSN structure" or "ISSN syntax") can be expressed as follows: NNNN-NNNC Here, N is in the set {0,1,2,3...,9}, a digit character, and C is in {0,1,2,3,...,9,X}

Table Setting

Food Research International Ranking and SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

SCImago Journal Rank is an indicator, which measures the scientific influence of journals. It considers the number of citations received by a journal and the importance of the journals from where these citations come.

Food Research International Publisher

The publisher of Food Research International is Elsevier Ltd. . The publishing house of this journal is located in the United Kingdom . Its coverage history is as follows: 1992-2022 .

Call For Papers (CFPs)

Please check the official website of this journal to find out the complete details and Call For Papers (CFPs).

Abbreviation

The International Organization for Standardization 4 (ISO 4) abbreviation of Food Research International is Food Res. Int. . ISO 4 is an international standard which defines a uniform and consistent system for the abbreviation of serial publication titles, which are published regularly. The primary use of ISO 4 is to abbreviate or shorten the names of scientific journals using the technique of List of Title Word Abbreviations (LTWA).

As ISO 4 is an international standard, the abbreviation ('Food Res. Int.') can be used for citing, indexing, abstraction, and referencing purposes.

How to publish in Food Research International

If your area of research or discipline is related to Food Science, etc. , please check the journal's official website to understand the complete publication process.

Acceptance Rate

  • Interest/demand of researchers/scientists for publishing in a specific journal/conference.
  • The complexity of the peer review process and timeline.
  • Time taken from draft submission to final publication.
  • Number of submissions received and acceptance slots
  • And Many More.

The simplest way to find out the acceptance rate or rejection rate of a Journal/Conference is to check with the journal's/conference's editorial team through emails or through the official website.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What is the impact score of food research international.

The latest impact score of Food Research International is 8.96. It is computed in the year 2023.

What is the h-index of Food Research International?

The latest h-index of Food Research International is 195. It is evaluated in the year 2023.

What is the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) of Food Research International?

The latest SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) of Food Research International is 1.360. It is calculated in the year 2023.

What is the ranking of Food Research International?

The latest ranking of Food Research International is 2506. This ranking is among 27955 Journals, Conferences, and Book Series. It is computed in the year 2023.

Who is the publisher of Food Research International?

Food Research International is published by Elsevier Ltd.. The publication country of this journal is United Kingdom.

What is the abbreviation of Food Research International?

This standard abbreviation of Food Research International is Food Res. Int..

Is "Food Research International" a Journal, Conference or Book Series?

Food Research International is a journal published by Elsevier Ltd..

What is the scope of Food Research International?

  • Food Science

For detailed scope of Food Research International, check the official website of this journal.

What is the ISSN of Food Research International?

The International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) of Food Research International is/are as follows: 09639969.

What is the best quartile for Food Research International?

The best quartile for Food Research International is Q1.

What is the coverage history of Food Research International?

The coverage history of Food Research International is as follows 1992-2022.

Credits and Sources

  • Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR), https://www.scimagojr.com/
  • Journal Impact Factor, https://clarivate.com/
  • Issn.org, https://www.issn.org/
  • Scopus, https://www.scopus.com/
Note: The impact score shown here is equivalent to the average number of times documents published in a journal/conference in the past two years have been cited in the current year (i.e., Cites / Doc. (2 years)). It is based on Scopus data and can be a little higher or different compared to the impact factor (IF) produced by Journal Citation Report. Please refer to the Web of Science data source to check the exact journal impact factor ™ (Thomson Reuters) metric.

Impact Score, SJR, h-Index, and Other Important metrics of These Journals, Conferences, and Book Series

Check complete list

Food Research International Impact Score (IS) Trend

Top journals/conferences in food science.

food research international quartile

FOOD RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL

  • Journal Search
  • Journal Details

Note: The following journal information is for reference only. Please check the journal website for updated information prior to submission.

FOOD RES INT

FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

  • Popular journals in the same field
  • Recent articles

Verified Reviews

Find the ideal target journal for your manuscript.

Explore over 38,000 international journals covering a vast array of academic fields.

Become a Peeref-certified reviewer

The Peeref Institute provides free reviewer training that teaches the core competencies of the academic peer review process.

Food Research International impact factor, indexing, ranking (2024)

food

Aim and Scope

The Food Research International is a research journal that publishes research related to Agricultural and Biological Sciences . This journal is published by the Elsevier Ltd.. The ISSN of this journal is 9639969 . Based on the Scopus data, the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) of food research international is 1.36 .

Food Research International Ranking

The Impact Factor of Food Research International is 7.425.

The impact factor (IF) is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. It is used to measure the importance or rank of a journal by calculating the times its articles are cited.

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) in Philadelphia. Impact factors began to be calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson-Reuters spun off and sold ISI to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate , which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Important Metrics

Food research international indexing.

The food research international is indexed in:

  • Web of Science (SCIE)

An indexed journal means that the journal has gone through and passed a review process of certain requirements done by a journal indexer.

The Web of Science Core Collection includes the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI), and Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI).

Food Research International Impact Factor 2024

The latest impact factor of food research international is 7.425 .

The impact factor (IF) is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. It is used to measure the importance or rank of a journal by calculating the times it's articles are cited.

Note: Every year, The Clarivate releases the Journal Citation Report (JCR). The JCR provides information about academic journals including impact factor. The latest JCR was released in June, 2023. The JCR 2024 will be released in the June 2024.

Food Research International Quartile

The latest Quartile of food research international is Q1 .

Each subject category of journals is divided into four quartiles: Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4. Q1 is occupied by the top 25% of journals in the list; Q2 is occupied by journals in the 25 to 50% group; Q3 is occupied by journals in the 50 to 75% group and Q4 is occupied by journals in the 75 to 100% group.

Journal Publication Time

The publication time may vary depending on factors such as the complexity of the research and the current workload of the editorial team. Journals typically request reviewers to submit their reviews within 3-4 weeks. However, some journals lack mechanisms to enforce this deadline, making it difficult to predict the duration of the peer review process.

The review time also depends upon the quality of the research paper.

Call for Papers

Visit to the official website of the journal/ conference to check the details about call for papers.

How to publish in Food Research International?

If your research is related to Agricultural and Biological Sciences, then visit the official website of food research international and send your manuscript.

Tips for publishing in Food Research International:

  • Selection of research problem.
  • Presenting a solution.
  • Designing the paper.
  • Make your manuscript publication worthy.
  • Write an effective results section.
  • Mind your references.

Acceptance Rate

Final summary.

  • The impact factor of food research international is 7.425.
  • The food research international is a reputed research journal.
  • It is published by Elsevier Ltd. .
  • The journal is indexed in UGC CARE, Scopus, SCIE, PubMed .
  • The (SJR) SCImago Journal Rank is 1.36 .

SIMILIAR JOURNALS

EVOLUTION AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

ADAPTIVE HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND PHYSIOLOGY

CUADERNOS DE NEUROPSICOLOGIA-PANAMERICAN JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

NEUROSCIENCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS

REVISTA CHILENA DE NEUROPSICOLOGIA

BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES

BEHAVIOURAL PROCESSES

BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY

EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY

INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

TOP RESEARCH JOURNALS

  • Agricultural & Biological Sciences
  • Arts & Humanities
  • Business, Management and Accounting
  • Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Social Sciences

International Food Research Journal - WoS Journal Info

  • Editorial Board
  • Author's Guide
  • Code of Ethics
  • List of Issues
  • FOOD Website

© 2008 IFRJ, Faculty of Food Science & Technology, UPM.

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

  • View all journals
  • My Account Login
  • Explore content
  • About the journal
  • Publish with us
  • Sign up for alerts
  • Open access
  • Published: 25 May 2024

Association between modified youth healthy eating index and nutritional status among Iranian children in Zabol city: a cross-sectional study

  • Farshad Amirkhizi   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-1477-0260 1 ,
  • Mohammad-Reza Jowshan   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0001-8603-5674 2 ,
  • Soudabeh Hamedi-Shahraki   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-2270-7421 3 &
  • Somayyeh Asghari   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-0501-0115 2  

Scientific Reports volume  14 , Article number:  11978 ( 2024 ) Cite this article

Metrics details

  • Nutrition disorders
  • Public health

Diet quality in childhood and adolescence can affect health outcomes such as physical and cognitive growth and preventing chronic diseases in adulthood. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between diet quality using the modified youth healthy eating index (MYHEI) with socioeconomic factors and nutrition status in 7–12-year-old children in Iran. This descriptive-cross-sectional study was performed on 580 students in Zabol, Iran, selected through multistage cluster sampling. The diet was assessed through the 168-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and eating behaviors. Then, the MYHEI scoring system was used to calculate the diet quality. In addition, we used the WHO growth indices, such as weight to age, height to age, and body mass index (BMI) to age ratios, to evaluate nutrition status. The mean total MYHEI score in children was 56.3 ± 11.2. Among children with the highest MYHEI score quartile, the number of girls was significantly higher than boys ( p  = 0.001). The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 25.3%, 17.4%, and 21.7%, respectively. The prevalence of underweight (OR: 2.2; 95% CI  1.26, 3.90,  p  = 0.001) and stunting (OR: 3.2; 95% CI   1.65, 6.14,  p  = 0.006) were significantly lower in the higher MYHEI score quartile compared to the lower quartile. The overall diet quality of most children should be modified. Therefore, to improve the children’s health and nutrition status, it is necessary to perform nutritional interventions such as training and promotional programs, especially in schools.

Introduction

The emerging evidence in the last few decades has shown important changes in diet due to economic changes, urbanization, and globalization 1 . Based on the nutrition global reports in 2018, one out of three people is struggling with malnutrition, one out of 20 children is dealing with hunger and one out of five deaths is assigned to low diet quality 2 . These alterations have led to a double burden of malnutrition and an increased risk of chronic and non-communicable diseases including obesity, diabetes type 2, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and some types of cancer especially in low- and middle-income countries 3 , 4 . In Iran, the statistics of the Second National Integrated Micronutrients Survey (NIMS-II) in 2018 reported the prevalence of wasting and stunting as 8% and 5% respectively, and the prevalence of obesity or overweight was reported as approximately 16% 5 . In Zabol, underweight, wasting, and stunting among kindergarten were reported at 5%, 7.1%, and 7.3% respectively 6 .

Nutrition is one of the major influential factors in the development of cognitive, emotional, mental, and physical growth in childhood and early adolescence 7 . This part of life is the best opportunity to improve the nutrition status and prevent the health consequences caused by malnutrition and chronic diseases 8 . A dietary pattern institutionalized in this stage can continue until adulthood. That is why identifying different aspects of nutrition and the quality of the diet and its association with socio-economic and demographic factors is vital 9 . Several studies have indicated that a low-quality diet could affect mental and physical health as well as human and economic resources 10 , 11 . Since foods and macro- /micronutrients are not commonly consumed alone, investigating the dietary patterns makes it possible to study the impact of the whole diet on nutritional status which provides a practical approach for dietary recommendations to improve overall health 12 .

The Healthy Eating Index (HEI) has been considered to assess the diet quality in different societies with different food patterns. On the other hand, the Modified Youth HEI (MYHEI) scoring system was developed to rate the diet quality in the population of children and adolescents 13 which was modified and validated for the Iranian children and adolescents by Mirmiran et al 14 . Higher MYHEI scores indicate the consumption of nutrient-dense and healthy foods. Given the impact of nutrition status on health outcomes and shaping nutrition habits during childhood, evaluation of the diet quality is of high importance. On the other hand, studies evaluating the association of MYHEI scores with nutritional status among Iranian children and adolescents are limited. So, the current study was performed to evaluate the relationship between the quality of the diet using MYHEI with some socio-demographic factors and nutritional outcomes including stunting, wasting, and being underweight as well as energy and nutrient intakes among 7–12-year-old Iranian children.

Materials and methods

Study subjects.

In the present cross-sectional study, 580 school children aged 7–12 years were recruited from May to September 2021 by a multi-stage cluster sampling method as a representative sample of children in the urban areas of Zabol, Sistan and Baluchestan Province in the southeast of Iran. At first, schools were selected as clusters, and then school classes were considered as strata. Afterward, the children were randomly chosen from the list of student records of each class.

The sample size of the study was calculated based on information obtained from the study by Shahraki et al 15 . By considering a confidence interval of 95% ( z ), a degree of precision of 3% ( d ), and a prevalence of stunting of 16% ( p ), it was calculated that 574 subjects needed to be included in the study. Estimating a nonresponse rate of 5%, 602 children were invited to participate in this study. The inclusion criteria were being in the age range of 7 to 12 years and the willingness of child parents to participate in the study. The exclusion criteria included taking any medications, being on a specific diet, and having any hereditary disorders or chronic diseases. After excluding those with implausible energy intakes of lower than 500 kcal/day and higher than 4000 kcal/day (12 boys, 10 girls), 580 children remained for the analyses.

Demographic data and anthropometric measurements

General characteristics of children and their parents including age and sex, parent’s educational level, parent’s occupation, household size, and number of children in the household were obtained through face-to-face interviews with the child’s mother by two trained research assistants using a questionnaire.

The weight of participants was measured without shoes in light clothing using a Beurer digital weighing scale (Beurer BF66, Germany). Also, height was measured in a standing position without shoes by mounting tape to the nearest 0.1 cm precision. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as weight (kg) divided by squared height (m 2 ). The weighing scale was calibrated to zero before taking every measurement. To minimize the subjective error, all measurements were done by the same person.

Assessment of dietary intake

Dietary intake was evaluated using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) with 168 food items, which was designed and validated specifically for the Iranian population 14 . The good validity and reliability of the FFQ in terms of assessing the nutrient and food consumption of Iranian children has been reported previously 16 . The FFQ also evaluated eating behaviors relevant to the diet quality of children, including the use of sugar-sweetened beverages, sweet snacks, salty snacks, and the frequency of eating fast foods.

The trained research assistants administered all the questionnaires by interviewing the children and their mothers. The mothers were asked about the consumption of a given serving of each food item by children during the previous year on a daily ( e.g. bread), weekly ( e.g. rice, milk), or monthly ( e.g. fish) basis. The research assistants guided the child’s mothers on the estimation of food quantities, using a set of calibrated household measurements ( e.g. cups, glasses, bowls, plates, spoons, ladles). Portion sizes of consumed foods were then converted to the gram, using household measures. Food intakes were then converted to energy and other nutrients using the Nutritionist-IV (N4) software program (version 7.0; N-Squared Computing, Salem, OR, USA) 17 , 18 , modified for Iranian foods. Almost all foods eaten by the subjects could be coded. When a particular ethnic food was not in the database of N4, it was coded as a similar item.

Assessment of adherence to the modified youth healthy eating index

Adherence of the participants to the healthy eating guidelines was assessed using the MYHEI scoring system. Briefly, MYHEI consisted of 10 components including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat ratio, sugar-sweetened beverages, butter and margarine, sweet snacks, salty snacks, and fast foods. In the MYHEI scoring system, higher consumption of the five components (whole grains, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat ratio) and avoidance or lower consumption of the remaining five components (sugar-sweetened beverages, butter and margarine, sweet snacks, salty snacks, and fast foods) indicate a healthier diet. Each component is scored 0 (for lack of adherence) to 10 (for full adherence), with intermediate scores calculated to indicate the degree of adherence to dietary recommendations. All the component scores are summed to obtain a total MYHEI score, which ranges from 0 to 100, with a higher score indicating a healthier diet. The criteria for scoring each component are summarized in Table 1 .

Assessment of nutritional outcomes

In this study, underweight, stunting, and wasting as nutritional outcomes were investigated in the participants. Nutritional outcomes of children were evaluated by calculating weight-for-age (WAZ), height-for-age (HAZ), and BMI-for-age (BAZ) Z scores according to the World Health Organization (WHO) growth standards 2007 for 5–19 years (WHO 2007). The Z scores for these nutritional indicators were calculated using the WHO Anthro Plus software program (version 1.0.4) 19 . Underweight, stunting, and wasting among children were considered as WAZ, HAZ, and BAZ less than 2 standard deviations (Z score < -2SD) below the median of the reference population (growth references, WHO 2007), respectively 19 .

Statistical analysis

Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS version 25 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). Participants were classified based on cut-points of MYHEI in quartiles categories as follows: 1st, < 47.5; 2nd, 47.5 to < 54.5; 3rd, 54.5 to < 64.4; 4th, ≥ 64.4. The Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to determine the normality of the data. The results are presented as mean ± standard deviation for quantitative data with normal distribution; while for qualitative data, frequency (percent) was used. Noticeable variations in anthropometric and general characteristics across quartile groups of MYHEI were assessed by the ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc test. To identify considerable differences, the Pearson chi-square (χ 2 ) test was employed across quartile groups of MYHEI for qualitative data.

Age-, sex- and energy-adjusted intakes of nutrients and food groups were compared across the MYHEI categories using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with Bonferroni correction. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare numerical variables with non-normal distribution. The association of MYHEI component scores and nutritional outcomes among participants were also investigated by ANCOVA, after adjusting for age, sex, and energy intake. To explore the relationship between MYHEI and the probability of underweight, stunting, and wasting, multivariate logistic regression was used in crude and adjusted models. In the adjusted model, important factors including age (years), sex (boy/girl), and energy intake (kcal/day) were controlled. In all multivariate models, the fourth quartile (Q 4 ) of the MYHEI was considered as a reference. The Mantel–Haenszel extension test was used to evaluate the overall trend of increasing quartile categories of MYHEI associated with an increasing prevalence of nutritional outcomes. The findings of logistic regression are described as adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A p -value < 0.05 was defined as significant.

Ethics approval and consent to participate

All the methods and procedures carried out in this study were by the guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the Ethics Committee of Zabol University of Medical Sciences (Ethics code: IR.ZBMU.REC.1401.006). Before the beginning of the study, children’s parents were fully informed about the objectives and protocol of the study. Parents and guardians provided informed written consent for their children participating in the study. Parents were informed that they could revoke the participation agreement at any time.

The study sample consisted of 580 children with a mean (± standard deviation) of 9.6 ± 1.6 years. Of this children population, 48.1% ( n  = 279) were boys and 51.9% ( n  = 301) were girls. The general characteristics of children and their households across quartiles of MYHEI scores are presented in Table 2 . Children in the highest quartile of MYHEI were more likely to be girls ( p  = 0.001) and had significantly higher weight, height, and BMI ( p  < 0.0001 for all) compared with those in the lowest quartile. Furthermore, children in the second and third quartiles of MYHEI had higher weight and BMI compared with those in the first quartile ( p  < 0.05 for all). There were no significant differences regarding education levels and occupation status of children’s parents, household size, and the number of children per household across categories of MYHEI.

Age, sex, and energy-adjusted means for selected nutrients and food groups across quartiles of MYHEI are shown in Table 3 . Children in the highest quartile of MYHEI compared with the lowest quartile had significantly higher intakes of energy ( p  < 0.0001), protein ( p  < 0.05), cholesterol ( p  < 0.05), vitamin A ( p  < 0.0001), vitamin B 6 ( p  < 0.05), folate ( p  < 0.0001), calcium ( p  < 0.0001), and zinc ( p  < 0.0001). Likewise, children in the third quartile of MYHEI had higher intakes of energy, protein, vitamin A, vitamin B 6 , folate, calcium, and zinc compared with those in the first quartile ( p  < 0.05 for all). Greater adherence to MYHEI was associated with higher consumption of fruits and dairy products. Those in the third or fourth quartiles of MYHEI had significantly higher consumption of fruits ( p  < 0.0001) and dairy products ( p  < 0.05) compared with those in the first quartile. There was no significant difference regarding intakes of carbohydrates, total fat, SFA, vitamin C, iron, magnesium, and consumption of meats, vegetables, nuts, and legumes across MYHEI quartiles (Table 3 ).

The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting among participants was 25.3%, 17.4%, and 21.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference regarding the prevalence of the aforementioned nutritional outcomes between girls and boys (data not shown). The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting across quartiles of MYHEI is shown in Fig.  1 , As can be seen, underweight ( p -trend = 0.001) and stunting ( p -trend < 0.0001) were significantly lower prevalent among participants in the highest quartile of MYHEI compared with those in the bottom quartile. Indeed, greater adherence to MYHEI was associated with a lower prevalence of underweight and stunting in the children. No significant associations were found between adherence to MYHEI and the prevalence of wasting among the participants.

figure 1

The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting among children across the quartiles of Modified Youth Healthy Eating Index scores (MYHEI). Quartile cut-points of MYHEI (Q) are as follows: 1st quartile, < 47.5; 2nd quartile, 47.5 to < 54.5; 3rd quartile, 54.5 to < 64.4; 4th quartile, ≥ 64.4. P -values derived from Mantel-Hanszel extension χ 2 test.

The association of MYHEI component scores and nutritional outcomes among children is presented in Table 4 . The mean (± standard deviation) of the MYHEI total score was 56.3 ± 11.2. The highest and lowest scores of MYHEI components were related to “whole grains” (8.3 ± 1.3) and “meat ratio” (2.7 ± 1.6), respectively. The mean scores of “whole grains” ( p  < 0.0001), “meat ratio” ( p  = 0.008), and “sweet snacks” ( p  = 0.034) were significantly lower in underweight children compared with normal-weight children, after adjustment for confounders. Compared to the children with normal height growth, those who were stunted had significantly lower scores for “fruits” ( p  < 0.0001), “dairy” ( p  = 0.001), “meat ratio” ( p  = 0.005) and higher scores for “butter and margarine” ( p  = 0.001). No significant differences were found between wasted and normal children regarding the scores of MYHEI components. After adjustment for confounding factors, MYHEI’s total score in both underweight ( p  = 0.001) and stunted ( p  < 0.0001) children were significantly lower than children with normal growth. There were no significant associations between MYHEI total score and wasting among participants.

Table 5 indicates the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the incidence of underweight, stunting, and wasting as the dependent variables across quartiles of MYHEI as independent variables. In the crude model, the probability of having underweight (OR, Q 1 -Q 4 : 2.5, 1.5, 1.4, 1.0, respectively; p -trend = 0.001) and stunting (OR, Q 1 -Q 4 : 3.5, 2.1, 1.2, 1.0, respectively; p -trend < 0.0001) elevated with decreasing quartile of the MYHEI. The chance of having underweight (OR, Q 1 -Q 4 : 2.2, 1.4, 1.3, 1.0, respectively; p -trend = 006) and stunting (OR, Q 1 -Q 4 : 3.2, 2.0, 1.1, 1.0, respectively; p  = 0.001) significantly increased even after adjustment for age, sex and energy intake.

The current study investigated the connection between MYHEI and nutritional status and social-demographic factors in 7–12-year-old Iranian children. Results showed that the prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting among participants was 25.3%, 17.4%, and 21.7%, respectively, with no differences between girls and boys. Based on the findings, children in the highest quartile of MYHEI had significantly higher weight, height, and BMI with a lower prevalence of underweight and stunting. To the best of our knowledge, limited studies are available investigating the association between MYHEI and nutritional status in Iranian children.

Similar to this study findings, Koksal et al. determined a positive association between MYHEI score and weight, height, and BMI 20 . However, Askari et al. could not find any relationship between HEI scores and these anthropometric measurements in a cross-sectional study of 788 six-year-old children 11 which was also observed in several other studies that used HEI 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 . It seems that MYHEI is a better predictor for nutritional status than older HEI versions since salty snacks and sweet beverages and snacks, the core elements of MYHEI, are more frequently consumed by children, which may result in a lack of enough micronutrient intake and a higher rate of stunting 25 . Children in the highest quartile of MYHEI had significantly higher intakes of energy, protein, cholesterol, vitamin A, vitamin B 6 , folate, calcium, and zinc.

Furthermore, underweight children had significantly lower scores for “whole grains”, “meat ratio”, and “sweet snacks” and stunted children had lower scores for “fruits”, “dairy”, and “meat ratio” as well as a higher score for “butter and margarine” compared with normal children. Lower cereal consumption reduces macro- and micro-nutrient intakes including carbohydrate, protein, magnesium, vitamin E, calcium, and potassium which could result in the subjects being underweight. This implies adequate cereal intake might be essential for a weight balance in children 26 , 27 , 28 . On the other hand, it seems that inadequate intake of macronutrients and micronutrients may cause stunting, so the weight-to-height index (wasting) does not change with the lower intake of nutrients, while it may cause underweight, as indicated in current study findings.

MYHEI interestingly does not measure energy intake. However, this score is highly related to the intake of several essential nutrients and proteins necessary for the growth and health of children, which shows that higher MYHEI scores signify a better diet quality alongside its relation and impact on health and nutrition status 9 , 29 , 30 . Furthermore, participants in the highest MYHEI quartile reported considerably higher fruit and dairy intakes than the lower MYHEI quartile. These higher dairy intakes are rather important in teenagers due to being in their growth stage. These findings match some other studies 11 , 31 .

In accordance with the present study results, some of the previous studies also reported that females usually achieve higher MYHEI scores 32 , 33 , 34 . It has been shown that boys are less inclined to eat healthy foods to control their body weight. However, some studies did not support this conclusion 31 , 35 , 36 , 37 . No significant differences were found between household size, the number of children per household, and education levels and occupation status of children’s parents with MYHEI. Furthermore, unlike other studies, there was no other meaningful relationship between demographic and economic features such as education level, parent job status, family size, and the number of children in each family of MYHEI groups 7 , 38 , 39 , 40 .

Manios et al. in a study conducted on the Greek population, observed lower HEI scores in unemployed or less educated (less than 9 years) mothers compared to educated mothers (more than 9 years) in 2518 1–5-year-old children 7 . On the other hand, in a study on 326 students aged 13–17 years old by Yaghoobloo et al., there was no correlation between the parent's education level and their children's diet quality 31 . This lack of correlation could be due to the social conditions of adolescents to choose foods without adhering to parental guidance or the lack of connection between educational status and income in developing countries. Furthermore, this could reflect the cross-sectional study type that cannot observe and conclude the causality relationship between the MYHEI score and parental education.

This study has a variety of strengths and limitations. It should be noted that studies using MYHEI in analyzing diet quality in 7–12-year-old Iranian children are limited. Considering confounding factors in data analysis, proper sample size alongside the use of an authentic and reliable FFQ for diet analysis, trained interviewers, using standard methods in evaluation, as well as using the stricter MYHEI index for diet quality analysis compared to previous healthy diet indexes are the strengths of this study.

However, this is a cross-sectional study, which prevents the creation of any causal relationships. Furthermore, this study might have some common nutrition study biases, such as failure to report unhealthy food consumption properly, excessive healthy food reports, and lower or higher food consumption reports by parents or caretakers. This study uses multiple methods to facilitate diet reminders and reduce errors. Furthermore, not considering the effects of unknown confounding variables and data collection in a specific seasonal period might affect normal food intake. Also, some studies use 11–12-year-old students themselves with perception, conceptualization, memory skills, and accurate meal size estimation 41 . This might lead to more accurate reporting compared to parents.

The current study suggested a meaningful relationship between MYHEI and gender, anthropometric parameters, alongside the lower prevalence of stunting and underweight in 7–12-year-old Iranian students. However, there was no relationship with other indexes such as socioeconomic status, family education levels, and wasting prevalence. These findings might help develop health promotions and nutritional interventions, especially in schools to improve this population's diet quality. Future studies could further investigate the relationship between the MYHEI quality index with nutritional outcomes and general characteristics in childhood and adolescence.

Data availability

On reasonable request, the corresponding author will provide the datasets used and analyzed during the current work.

Abbreviations

Modified youth healthy eating index

Youth healthy eating index

  • Healthy eating index

Food frequency questionnaire

Body mass index

Cardiovascular disease

Second national integrated micronutrients survey

Nutritionist-IV

Weight-for-age

Height-for-age

BMI-for-age

World health organization

Analysis of covariance

Adjusted odds ratios

Confidence intervals

Saturated fatty acids

Organization, W.H. Report of the technical consultation on measuring healthy diets: concepts, methods and metrics: virtual meeting, 18–20 (2021)

Popkin, B. M., Corvalan, C. & Grummer-Strawn, L. M. Dynamics of the double burden of malnutrition and the changing nutrition reality. The Lancet 395 , 65–74 (2020).

Article   Google Scholar  

Khan, D. S. A. et al. Nutritional status and dietary intake of school-age children and early adolescents: Systematic review in a developing country and lessons for the global perspective. Front. Nutr. 2 (8), 739447 (2022).

Thomson, J. L., Landry, A. S., Tussing-Humphreys, L. M. & Goodman, M. H. Diet quality of children in the United States by body mass index and sociodemographic characteristics. Obes. Sci. Pract. 6 , 84–98 (2020).

Article   PubMed   Google Scholar  

Pouraram, H. et al. Second national integrated micronutrient survey in Iran: Study design and preliminary findings. Arch. Iran. Med. 21 , 137–144 (2018).

PubMed   Google Scholar  

Khoushabi, F., Abadi, H. B., Shadan, M. R. & Bagheri, S. Prevalence of malnutrition among kindergartens children in southeast of Iran. Res J Pharm Technol 12 , 313–218 (2019).

Manios, Y. et al. Diet quality of preschoolers in Greece based on the healthy eating index: the GENESIS study. J. Am. Diet Assoc. 109 , 616–623 (2009).

Article   CAS   PubMed   Google Scholar  

Gingras, V. et al. Associations of early parental concerns and feeding behaviors with child’s diet quality through mid-childhood. Nutrients 12 , 3231 (2020).

Article   PubMed   PubMed Central   Google Scholar  

Rauber, F., da Costa Louzada, M. L. & Vitolo, M. R. Healthy eating index measures diet quality of Brazilian children of low socioeconomic status. J. Am. College Nutr. 33 (1), 26–31 (2014).

Della Lucia, C. M. et al. Diet quality and adequacy of nutrients in preschool children: should rice fortified with micronutrients be included in school meals?. Nutrients 8 , 296 (2016).

Askari, M. et al. Healthy eating index and anthropometric status in young children: A cross-sectional study. Clin. Nutr. ESPEN 45 , 306–311 (2021).

Mullie, P., Clarys, P., Hulens, M. & Vansant, G. Dietary patterns and socioeconomic position. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 64 , 231–238 (2010).

Feskanich, D., Rockett, H. R. & Colditz, G. A. Modifying the Healthy Eating Index to assess diet quality in children and adolescents. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 104 , 1375–1383 (2004).

Hooshmand, F. et al. Modified healthy eating index and incidence of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: Tehran lipid and glucose study. J. Pediatr. 197 (134–139), 132 (2018).

Google Scholar  

Shahraki, S. H., Amirkhizi, F., Amirkhizi, B. & Hamedi, S. Household food insecurity is associated with nutritional status among Iranian children. Ecol. Food Nutr. 55 , 473–490 (2016).

Asghari, G., Yuzbashian, E., Mirmiran, P., Bahadoran, Z. & Azizi, F. Prediction of metabolic syndrome by a high intake of energy-dense nutrient-poor snacks in Iranian children and adolescents. Pediatr. Res. 79 , 697–704 (2016).

Haytowitz, D. et al. USDA national nutrient database for standard reference, release 24. US Department of Agriculture: Washington, DC, USA (2011).

Nutritionist, I. N-squared computing. Silverton: Nutritionist IV (1998).

Onis, M. D. et al. Development of a WHO growth reference for school-aged children and adolescents. Bull. World Health Organ. 85 , 660–667 (2007).

Koksal, E., Karacil Ermumcu, M. S. & Mortas, H. Description of the healthy eating indices-based diet quality in Turkish adults: a cross-sectional study. Environ. Health Prev. Med. 22 , 1–9 (2017).

Hurley, K. M. et al. The healthy eating index and youth healthy eating index are unique, nonredundant measures of diet quality among low-income, African American adolescents. J. Nutr. 139 , 359–364 (2009).

Article   CAS   PubMed   PubMed Central   Google Scholar  

Mohseni-Takalloo, S., Mirmiran, P., Hosseini-Esfahani, F., Mehrabi, Y. & Azizi, F. Metabolic syndrome and its association with healthy eating index-2005 in adolescents: Tehran lipid and glucose study. J. Food Nutr. Res. 2 , 155–161 (2014).

Woodruff, S., Hanning, R., McGoldrick, K. & Brown, K. Healthy eating index-C is positively associated with family dinner frequency among students in grades 6–8 from Southern Ontario Canada. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 64 , 454–460 (2010).

Tardivo, A. P. et al. Associations between healthy eating patterns and indicators of metabolic risk in postmenopausal women. Nutr. J. 9 , 1–9 (2010).

Contreras, M., Zelaya Blandón, E., Persson, L. Å. & Ekström, E. C. Consumption of highly processed snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and child feeding practices in a rural area of Nicaragua. Mater. Child Nutr. 12 , 164–176. https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12144 (2016).

Albertson, A. M., Reicks, M., Joshi, N. & Gugger, C. K. Whole grain consumption trends and associations with body weight measures in the United States: Results from the cross sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2012. Nutr. J. 15 , 1–14 (2015).

Schwingshackl, L. et al. Consumption of dairy products in relation to changes in anthropometric variables in adult populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. PLoS One 11 , e0157461 (2016).

Yu, Z. M. et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and body adiposity among populations in Eastern Canada: The Atlantic partnership for tomorrow’s health study. BMJ open 8 , e018060 (2018).

Drake, I. et al. Development of a diet quality index assessing adherence to the Swedish nutrition recommendations and dietary guidelines in the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Public Health Nutr. 14 , 835–845 (2011).

Golley, R. K., Hendrie, G. A. & McNaughton, S. A. Scores on the dietary guideline index for children and adolescents are associated with nutrient intake and socio-economic position but not adiposity. J. Nutr. 141 , 1340–1347 (2011).

Yaghoobloo, K., Azadbakhat, L., Nourian, M. & Mahaki, B. Evaluating diet adequacy using healthy eating index-2005 in 13–17-year-old students in Isfahan, Iran, in 2014. J. Health Syst. Res. 14 , 195–203 (2018).

Karimi, G., Heidari-Beni, M., Riahi, R., Qorbani, M. & Kelishadi, R. Healthy eating index in a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents by socio-demographic characteristics: The Weight disorders survey of the CASPIAN-IV Study. Turkish J. Pediatr. 62 , 930–939 (2020).

Hiza, H. A., Casavale, K. O., Guenther, P. M. & Davis, C. A. Diet quality of Americans differs by age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, and education level. J. Acad. Nutr. Diet. 113 , 297–306 (2013).

Van Lee, L. et al. Adherence to the Dutch dietary guidelines is inversely associated with 20-year mortality in a large prospective cohort study. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 70 , 262–268 (2016).

Article   ADS   PubMed   Google Scholar  

de Assis, M. M. et al. Food environment, social deprivation and obesity among students from Brazilian public schools. Public Health Nutr. 22 , 1920–1927 (2019).

Correa, E. N., Padez, C. M., Abreu, Â. H. & Vasconcelos, F. D. Geographic and socioeconomic distribution of food vendors: a case study of a municipality in the Southern Brazil. Cadernos de Saude Publica. 30 (33), e00145015 (2017).

Horta, P. M., Verly Junior, E. & Santos, L. C. D. Usual diet quality among 8-to 12-year-old Brazilian children. Cadernos de Saúde Pública 35 , e00044418 (2019).

Irala-Estevez, D. et al. A systematic review of socio-economic differences in food habits in Europe: Consumption of fruit and vegetables. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 54 , 706–714 (2000).

Tek, N. A. et al. Evaluation of dietary quality of adolescents using Healthy Eating Index. Nutr. Res. Pract. 5 , 322–328 (2011).

Fisberg, R. M. et al. Dietary quality and associated factors among adults living in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 106 , 2067–2072 (2006).

Torres, R., Santos, E., Orraca, L., Elias, A. & Palacios, C. Diet quality, social determinants, and weight status in Puerto Rican children aged 12 years. J. Acad. Nutr. Diet. 114 , 1230–1235 (2014).

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors express their gratitude to everybody who took part in the study. This project was also supported by the research council of Zabol University of Medical Sciences.

This study was supported by Zabol University of Medical Sciences.

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Public Health, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran

Farshad Amirkhizi

Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No#44, Hojjatdoust St., Naderi St., Keshavarz Blvd, Tehran, 141556117, Iran

Mohammad-Reza Jowshan & Somayyeh Asghari

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Public Health, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran

Soudabeh Hamedi-Shahraki

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Contributions

Conception and Design: F.A, S.H, S.A. Acquisition of Data: F.A, S.H, M.J. Analysis and Interpretation of Data: F.A, S.H. Drafting the Manuscript: F.A, M.J. Revising Manuscript for Intellectual Content: F.A, S.A. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Soudabeh Hamedi-Shahraki or Somayyeh Asghari .

Ethics declarations

Competing interests.

The authors declare no competing interests.

Consent for publication

Not applicable.

Additional information

Publisher's note.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ .

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article.

Amirkhizi, F., Jowshan, MR., Hamedi-Shahraki, S. et al. Association between modified youth healthy eating index and nutritional status among Iranian children in Zabol city: a cross-sectional study. Sci Rep 14 , 11978 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-024-63038-3

Download citation

Received : 09 January 2024

Accepted : 23 May 2024

Published : 25 May 2024

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-024-63038-3

Share this article

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Nutrition status
  • Underweight

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines . If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Quick links

  • Explore articles by subject
  • Guide to authors
  • Editorial policies

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

food research international quartile

Take the Quiz: Find the Best State for You »

What's the best state for you », china's food security dream faces land, soil and water woes.

China's Food Security Dream Faces Land, Soil and Water Woes

Reuters

FILE PHOTO: A worker shovels soil next to irrigation channels and recently planted shoots of Xinjiang poplar at the Yangguan state-backed forest farm, on the edge of the Gobi desert on the outskirts of Dunhuang, Gansu province, China, April 13, 2021. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo

By Mei Mei Chu

BEIJING (Reuters) - China, the world's biggest agriculture importer, has set targets to drastically reduce its reliance on overseas buying over the coming decade in line with its push for food security, but they will be exceedingly difficult to meet, experts say.

With limited land and water, China will have to sharply increase farming productivity through technology, including genetically modified crops, and expand area under cultivation to meet Beijing's 10-year projections.

The government envisions 92% self-sufficiency in staple grains and beans by 2033, up from 84% during 2021-2023, according to a document released in late April, on a path towards President Xi Jinping's goal to become an "agriculture power" by the middle of the century.

Cutting the country's imports would be a blow to producers from the U.S. to Brazil and Indonesia, who have expanded capacity to meet demand from China's 1.4 billion people, the world's largest market for soybeans, meat and grains.

Over the 10 years to 2033 the agriculture ministry projects a 75% plunge in corn imports to 6.8 million tons and a 60% drop for wheat to 4.85 million tons.

For soybeans, the biggest item on a farm import bill that totalled $234 billion last year, Beijing sees imports falling 21% to 78.7 million tons in a decade.

Those targets defy the trends of the past decade in which grains and oilseed imports have surged 87%.

"Forecasting a sharp reversal where in 10 years the country will be importing less than it does today seems questionable," said Darin Friedrichs, co-founder of Shanghai-based Sitonia Consulting.

China will struggle to meet its targets mainly due to a lack of land and water, five analysts and industry executives say.

In stark contrast to Beijing's projections, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sees China's corn imports in 2033/34 roughly in line with current levels and wheat imports declining 20%. In the biggest divergence, USDA expects soybean imports to rise 39%.

The USDA also expects growth in demand for animal feed, a key user of soybeans and corn, to outpace domestic corn output expansion and spur imports of sorghum and barley.

NATIONAL SECURITY

Food security has long been a priority for China, which has a painful history of famine and must feed nearly 20% of the global population with less than 9% of its arable land and 6% of its water resources.

The urgency to cut dependence on imports grew after the country faced supply chain disruptions during the COVID pandemic and the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

A trade war with the U.S., its No.2 agriculture supplier after Brazil, and climate shocks such as heavy rains last year that damaged China's wheat harvest, have added to the challenge.

On June 1, China will implement a food security law that calls for absolute self-sufficiency in staple grains and requires local governments to include food security in their economic and development plans.

That will add to other efforts to bolster food production, including stepped up grains insurance cover for farmers to protect their income, announced this week.

Last month, Beijing launched a drive to raise grain output by at least 50 million tons by 2030, spotlighting upgraded farmland and investments in seed technology for higher crop yields and quality.

SOIL CHALLENGES

China increased production of corn, soybeans, potatoes and oilseeds last year after expanding planting on previously uncultivated land and encouraging farmers to switch from cash crops to staples.

However, even as the world's no. 2 corn producer harvested a record 288.84 million metric tons last year, imports surged to a near-record 27.1 million tons, driven by traders' preference for corn from overseas that is often higher quality and cheaper.

Production growth has hit a bottleneck due to insufficient arable land, small production scale and a lack of farmers and agriculture technology, state media reported.

China's arable land per capita is less than one-third the level in Brazil and one-sixth the level of the U.S., World Bank data from 2021 shows.

Degraded and polluted soil in a country where a significant share of land is either rocky mountains or desert leave it with little space for expansion.

The government, which has increasingly called for protection of its fertile black soil, is set to complete a four-year soil survey in 2025. The last survey, in 2014, found that 40% of its arable land was degraded from overuse of chemicals and heavy metal contamination.

To compensate, China is pouring millions of dollars into research of farming water-intensive crops such as rice in the deserts of Inner Mongolia and Xinjiang.

By turning sand into soil and breeding saline-tolerant crops, it aims to develop more farmland, a strategy industry executives say will take time and heavy investments in fertiliser, irrigation and biotechnology.

One obstacle is China's predominance of small farms, run by aging owners who may not be able to afford or operate machinery such as drone sprayers, more productive seeds and technology such as big data and AI.

Farms in China average 0.65 hectares, compared to 187 hectares in the U.S. and 60 hectares in Germany. China is gradually shifting towards a consolidation of its fragmented farms.

After decades of hesitation, it is slowly adopting genetically modified crops, this year approving the planting of corn and soybean varieties that are higher-yielding and insect-resistant, as well as gene-edited disease-resistant wheat in hopes of accelerating production growth.

China's soybean yields at 1.99 tons per hectare lag the 3.38 and 3.4 ton-yields in Brazil and the U.S., which have embraced genetically modified soybeans.

But analysts say the government's target for cutting soybean imports is unrealistic. At best, China could ease its dependence on soybean imports to 70% from more than 80% now, said Carl Pray, an agriculture professor at Rutgers University in the U.S.

Almost all of China's soybeans are high protein varieties to produce tofu, and to replace imports it would need to rapidly expand production of high-oil producing varieties for cooking oil, which he said would be hard, even with research.

"To produce enough soybeans to replace the Brazilian and U.S. imports, there is just not enough land," Pray said.

($1 = 7.2276 yuan)

(This story has been refiled to correct a typo in the chart)

(Reporting by Mei Mei Chu; Editing by Tony Munroe and Sonali Paul)

Copyright 2024 Thomson Reuters .

Join the Conversation

Tags: United States , international trade , Brazil

America 2024

food research international quartile

Health News Bulletin

Stay informed on the latest news on health and COVID-19 from the editors at U.S. News & World Report.

Sign in to manage your newsletters »

Sign up to receive the latest updates from U.S News & World Report and our trusted partners and sponsors. By clicking submit, you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions & Privacy Policy .

You May Also Like

The 10 worst presidents.

U.S. News Staff Feb. 23, 2024

food research international quartile

Cartoons on President Donald Trump

Feb. 1, 2017, at 1:24 p.m.

food research international quartile

Photos: Obama Behind the Scenes

April 8, 2022

food research international quartile

Photos: Who Supports Joe Biden?

March 11, 2020

food research international quartile

Takeaways From the NCAA’s Settlement

Laura Mannweiler May 24, 2024

food research international quartile

Noncitizen Voting: the Fiction and Facts

Aneeta Mathur-Ashton May 24, 2024

food research international quartile

Quiz: Who Said What in Trump’s Trial?

U.S. News Staff May 24, 2024

food research international quartile

CDC: COVID-19 Strains Are on the Rise

Cecelia Smith-Schoenwalder May 24, 2024

food research international quartile

Consumers See Worsening Job Market

Tim Smart May 24, 2024

food research international quartile

Biden vs. the Border

Elliott Davis Jr. May 23, 2024

food research international quartile

food research international quartile

food research international quartile

RESTAURANT GLOBUS, Elektrostal - Restaurant Reviews & Photos - Tripadvisor

Applied Food Research

food research international quartile

Subject Area and Category

  • Food Science

Elsevier B.V.

Publication type

Information.

How to publish in this journal

food research international quartile

The set of journals have been ranked according to their SJR and divided into four equal groups, four quartiles. Q1 (green) comprises the quarter of the journals with the highest values, Q2 (yellow) the second highest values, Q3 (orange) the third highest values and Q4 (red) the lowest values.

The SJR is a size-independent prestige indicator that ranks journals by their 'average prestige per article'. It is based on the idea that 'all citations are not created equal'. SJR is a measure of scientific influence of journals that accounts for both the number of citations received by a journal and the importance or prestige of the journals where such citations come from It measures the scientific influence of the average article in a journal, it expresses how central to the global scientific discussion an average article of the journal is.

Evolution of the number of published documents. All types of documents are considered, including citable and non citable documents.

This indicator counts the number of citations received by documents from a journal and divides them by the total number of documents published in that journal. The chart shows the evolution of the average number of times documents published in a journal in the past two, three and four years have been cited in the current year. The two years line is equivalent to journal impact factor ™ (Thomson Reuters) metric.

Evolution of the total number of citations and journal's self-citations received by a journal's published documents during the three previous years. Journal Self-citation is defined as the number of citation from a journal citing article to articles published by the same journal.

Evolution of the number of total citation per document and external citation per document (i.e. journal self-citations removed) received by a journal's published documents during the three previous years. External citations are calculated by subtracting the number of self-citations from the total number of citations received by the journal’s documents.

International Collaboration accounts for the articles that have been produced by researchers from several countries. The chart shows the ratio of a journal's documents signed by researchers from more than one country; that is including more than one country address.

Not every article in a journal is considered primary research and therefore "citable", this chart shows the ratio of a journal's articles including substantial research (research articles, conference papers and reviews) in three year windows vs. those documents other than research articles, reviews and conference papers.

Ratio of a journal's items, grouped in three years windows, that have been cited at least once vs. those not cited during the following year.

Evolution of the percentage of female authors.

Evolution of the number of documents cited by public policy documents according to Overton database.

Evoution of the number of documents related to Sustainable Development Goals defined by United Nations. Available from 2018 onwards.

Scimago Journal & Country Rank

Leave a comment

Name * Required

Email (will not be published) * Required

* Required Cancel

The users of Scimago Journal & Country Rank have the possibility to dialogue through comments linked to a specific journal. The purpose is to have a forum in which general doubts about the processes of publication in the journal, experiences and other issues derived from the publication of papers are resolved. For topics on particular articles, maintain the dialogue through the usual channels with your editor.

Scimago Lab

Follow us on @ScimagoJR Scimago Lab , Copyright 2007-2024. Data Source: Scopus®

food research international quartile

Cookie settings

Cookie Policy

Legal Notice

Privacy Policy

Facts.net

40 Facts About Elektrostal

Lanette Mayes

Written by Lanette Mayes

Modified & Updated: 21 May 2024

Jessica Corbett

Reviewed by Jessica Corbett

40-facts-about-elektrostal

Elektrostal is a vibrant city located in the Moscow Oblast region of Russia. With a rich history, stunning architecture, and a thriving community, Elektrostal is a city that has much to offer. Whether you are a history buff, nature enthusiast, or simply curious about different cultures, Elektrostal is sure to captivate you.

This article will provide you with 40 fascinating facts about Elektrostal, giving you a better understanding of why this city is worth exploring. From its origins as an industrial hub to its modern-day charm, we will delve into the various aspects that make Elektrostal a unique and must-visit destination.

So, join us as we uncover the hidden treasures of Elektrostal and discover what makes this city a true gem in the heart of Russia.

Key Takeaways:

  • Elektrostal, known as the “Motor City of Russia,” is a vibrant and growing city with a rich industrial history, offering diverse cultural experiences and a strong commitment to environmental sustainability.
  • With its convenient location near Moscow, Elektrostal provides a picturesque landscape, vibrant nightlife, and a range of recreational activities, making it an ideal destination for residents and visitors alike.

Known as the “Motor City of Russia.”

Elektrostal, a city located in the Moscow Oblast region of Russia, earned the nickname “Motor City” due to its significant involvement in the automotive industry.

Home to the Elektrostal Metallurgical Plant.

Elektrostal is renowned for its metallurgical plant, which has been producing high-quality steel and alloys since its establishment in 1916.

Boasts a rich industrial heritage.

Elektrostal has a long history of industrial development, contributing to the growth and progress of the region.

Founded in 1916.

The city of Elektrostal was founded in 1916 as a result of the construction of the Elektrostal Metallurgical Plant.

Located approximately 50 kilometers east of Moscow.

Elektrostal is situated in close proximity to the Russian capital, making it easily accessible for both residents and visitors.

Known for its vibrant cultural scene.

Elektrostal is home to several cultural institutions, including museums, theaters, and art galleries that showcase the city’s rich artistic heritage.

A popular destination for nature lovers.

Surrounded by picturesque landscapes and forests, Elektrostal offers ample opportunities for outdoor activities such as hiking, camping, and birdwatching.

Hosts the annual Elektrostal City Day celebrations.

Every year, Elektrostal organizes festive events and activities to celebrate its founding, bringing together residents and visitors in a spirit of unity and joy.

Has a population of approximately 160,000 people.

Elektrostal is home to a diverse and vibrant community of around 160,000 residents, contributing to its dynamic atmosphere.

Boasts excellent education facilities.

The city is known for its well-established educational institutions, providing quality education to students of all ages.

A center for scientific research and innovation.

Elektrostal serves as an important hub for scientific research, particularly in the fields of metallurgy , materials science, and engineering.

Surrounded by picturesque lakes.

The city is blessed with numerous beautiful lakes , offering scenic views and recreational opportunities for locals and visitors alike.

Well-connected transportation system.

Elektrostal benefits from an efficient transportation network, including highways, railways, and public transportation options, ensuring convenient travel within and beyond the city.

Famous for its traditional Russian cuisine.

Food enthusiasts can indulge in authentic Russian dishes at numerous restaurants and cafes scattered throughout Elektrostal.

Home to notable architectural landmarks.

Elektrostal boasts impressive architecture, including the Church of the Transfiguration of the Lord and the Elektrostal Palace of Culture.

Offers a wide range of recreational facilities.

Residents and visitors can enjoy various recreational activities, such as sports complexes, swimming pools, and fitness centers, enhancing the overall quality of life.

Provides a high standard of healthcare.

Elektrostal is equipped with modern medical facilities, ensuring residents have access to quality healthcare services.

Home to the Elektrostal History Museum.

The Elektrostal History Museum showcases the city’s fascinating past through exhibitions and displays.

A hub for sports enthusiasts.

Elektrostal is passionate about sports, with numerous stadiums, arenas, and sports clubs offering opportunities for athletes and spectators.

Celebrates diverse cultural festivals.

Throughout the year, Elektrostal hosts a variety of cultural festivals, celebrating different ethnicities, traditions, and art forms.

Electric power played a significant role in its early development.

Elektrostal owes its name and initial growth to the establishment of electric power stations and the utilization of electricity in the industrial sector.

Boasts a thriving economy.

The city’s strong industrial base, coupled with its strategic location near Moscow, has contributed to Elektrostal’s prosperous economic status.

Houses the Elektrostal Drama Theater.

The Elektrostal Drama Theater is a cultural centerpiece, attracting theater enthusiasts from far and wide.

Popular destination for winter sports.

Elektrostal’s proximity to ski resorts and winter sport facilities makes it a favorite destination for skiing, snowboarding, and other winter activities.

Promotes environmental sustainability.

Elektrostal prioritizes environmental protection and sustainability, implementing initiatives to reduce pollution and preserve natural resources.

Home to renowned educational institutions.

Elektrostal is known for its prestigious schools and universities, offering a wide range of academic programs to students.

Committed to cultural preservation.

The city values its cultural heritage and takes active steps to preserve and promote traditional customs, crafts, and arts.

Hosts an annual International Film Festival.

The Elektrostal International Film Festival attracts filmmakers and cinema enthusiasts from around the world, showcasing a diverse range of films.

Encourages entrepreneurship and innovation.

Elektrostal supports aspiring entrepreneurs and fosters a culture of innovation, providing opportunities for startups and business development.

Offers a range of housing options.

Elektrostal provides diverse housing options, including apartments, houses, and residential complexes, catering to different lifestyles and budgets.

Home to notable sports teams.

Elektrostal is proud of its sports legacy, with several successful sports teams competing at regional and national levels.

Boasts a vibrant nightlife scene.

Residents and visitors can enjoy a lively nightlife in Elektrostal, with numerous bars, clubs, and entertainment venues.

Promotes cultural exchange and international relations.

Elektrostal actively engages in international partnerships, cultural exchanges, and diplomatic collaborations to foster global connections.

Surrounded by beautiful nature reserves.

Nearby nature reserves, such as the Barybino Forest and Luchinskoye Lake, offer opportunities for nature enthusiasts to explore and appreciate the region’s biodiversity.

Commemorates historical events.

The city pays tribute to significant historical events through memorials, monuments, and exhibitions, ensuring the preservation of collective memory.

Promotes sports and youth development.

Elektrostal invests in sports infrastructure and programs to encourage youth participation, health, and physical fitness.

Hosts annual cultural and artistic festivals.

Throughout the year, Elektrostal celebrates its cultural diversity through festivals dedicated to music, dance, art, and theater.

Provides a picturesque landscape for photography enthusiasts.

The city’s scenic beauty, architectural landmarks, and natural surroundings make it a paradise for photographers.

Connects to Moscow via a direct train line.

The convenient train connection between Elektrostal and Moscow makes commuting between the two cities effortless.

A city with a bright future.

Elektrostal continues to grow and develop, aiming to become a model city in terms of infrastructure, sustainability, and quality of life for its residents.

In conclusion, Elektrostal is a fascinating city with a rich history and a vibrant present. From its origins as a center of steel production to its modern-day status as a hub for education and industry, Elektrostal has plenty to offer both residents and visitors. With its beautiful parks, cultural attractions, and proximity to Moscow, there is no shortage of things to see and do in this dynamic city. Whether you’re interested in exploring its historical landmarks, enjoying outdoor activities, or immersing yourself in the local culture, Elektrostal has something for everyone. So, next time you find yourself in the Moscow region, don’t miss the opportunity to discover the hidden gems of Elektrostal.

Q: What is the population of Elektrostal?

A: As of the latest data, the population of Elektrostal is approximately XXXX.

Q: How far is Elektrostal from Moscow?

A: Elektrostal is located approximately XX kilometers away from Moscow.

Q: Are there any famous landmarks in Elektrostal?

A: Yes, Elektrostal is home to several notable landmarks, including XXXX and XXXX.

Q: What industries are prominent in Elektrostal?

A: Elektrostal is known for its steel production industry and is also a center for engineering and manufacturing.

Q: Are there any universities or educational institutions in Elektrostal?

A: Yes, Elektrostal is home to XXXX University and several other educational institutions.

Q: What are some popular outdoor activities in Elektrostal?

A: Elektrostal offers several outdoor activities, such as hiking, cycling, and picnicking in its beautiful parks.

Q: Is Elektrostal well-connected in terms of transportation?

A: Yes, Elektrostal has good transportation links, including trains and buses, making it easily accessible from nearby cities.

Q: Are there any annual events or festivals in Elektrostal?

A: Yes, Elektrostal hosts various events and festivals throughout the year, including XXXX and XXXX.

Elektrostal's fascinating history, vibrant culture, and promising future make it a city worth exploring. For more captivating facts about cities around the world, discover the unique characteristics that define each city . Uncover the hidden gems of Moscow Oblast through our in-depth look at Kolomna. Lastly, dive into the rich industrial heritage of Teesside, a thriving industrial center with its own story to tell.

Was this page helpful?

Our commitment to delivering trustworthy and engaging content is at the heart of what we do. Each fact on our site is contributed by real users like you, bringing a wealth of diverse insights and information. To ensure the highest standards of accuracy and reliability, our dedicated editors meticulously review each submission. This process guarantees that the facts we share are not only fascinating but also credible. Trust in our commitment to quality and authenticity as you explore and learn with us.

Share this Fact:

IMAGES

  1. 食品专业徐宝军教授受邀担任国际期刊Food Research International副主编-理工科技学院

    food research international quartile

  2. The top quartile of nutrient dense, low-cost food categories. NRF

    food research international quartile

  3. New study pinpoints ways to improve quality of food & nutrition research

    food research international quartile

  4. Food group intakes among non-consumers ( ) and by quartiles

    food research international quartile

  5. 我校研究生在《Food Research International》(JCR一区)发表学术论文-鲁东大学

    food research international quartile

  6. Average intake amount (g) of each food group according to the quartile

    food research international quartile

VIDEO

  1. 로쿰 혹은 터키쉬 딜라이트의 유래

  2. Percentile ! Percentile Rank ! Quartile ! Decile ! Detailed Explanation ! Utility in Education

  3. Market Analysis : Market Research Survey 🦽🦽🦽 Kalyan Today 589-28-189 Ep

  4. Descriptive Statistics 2

  5. Another 5 Star Review

  6. What is Quartiles and Inter Quartile Range

COMMENTS

  1. Food Research International

    Food Research International provides a forum for the rapid dissemination of significant novel and high impact research in food science, technology, engineering and nutrition. ... four quartiles. Q1 (green) comprises the quarter of the journals with the highest values, Q2 (yellow) the second highest values, Q3 (orange) the third highest values ...

  2. Food Research International

    Food Research International provides a forum for the rapid dissemination of significant novel and high impact research in food science, technology, engineering and nutrition. The journal only publishes novel, high quality and high impact review papers, original research papers and letters to the editors, in the various disciplines encompassing the science and technology of food.

  3. Journal Rankings on Food Science

    International Scientific Journal & Country Ranking. SCImago Institutions Rankings SCImago Media Rankings SCImago Iber SCImago Research Centers Ranking SCImago Graphica Ediciones Profesionales de la Información

  4. Food Research International

    The best quartile of Food Research International is Q1. This journal has received a total of 24113 citations during the last three years (Preceding 2022). Food Research International Impact Score 2022-2023. The latest impact score (IS) of the Food Research International is 8.96. It is computed in the year 2023 as per its definition and based on ...

  5. Food Research International

    Food Research International has an h-index of 195.It means 195 articles of this journal have more than 195 number of citations. The h-index is a way of measuring the productivity and citation impact of the publications. The h-index is defined as the maximum value of h such that the given journal/author has published h papers that have each been cited at least h number of times.

  6. Food Research International

    The main emphasis of Food Research International is the research on Antioxidant, emphasizing the topic of ABTS. ABTS studies tackled cover an aspect of the field of DPPH. ... The chart below presents the interquartile range (first quartile 25%, median 50% and third quartile 75%) of the number of citations of articles over time.

  7. Guide for authors

    Introduction Food Research International is the successor to the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology Journal. Building on the quality and strengths of its predecessor, Food Research International has been developed to create a truly international forum for the communication of research in food science. Food Research International provides a forum for the rapid dissemination of ...

  8. FOOD RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL

    0963-9969. eISSN: 1873-7145. Category / Quartile: FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY - SCIE (Q1) WoS Core Citation Indexes: SCIE - Science Citation Index Expanded. Impact Factor (IF): 8.1.

  9. FOOD RESEARCH INTERNATIONAL

    0963-9969. Aims and Scope. Food Research International provides a forum for the rapid dissemination of significant novel and high impact research in food science, technology, engineering and nutrition. The journal only publishes novel, high quality and high impact review papers, original research papers and letters to the editors, in the ...

  10. Food Research International Latest Journal's Impact IF 2023-2024

    Food Research International 2023-2024 Journal's Impact IF is 7.425. Check Out IF Ranking, Prediction, Trend & Key Factor Analysis. Journal Search Engine. Share About. ... Quartile Rank Percentile; Agricultural and Biological Sciences - Food Science-Q1-13/338-96% Key Factor Analysis

  11. Food Research International

    2005 — Volume 38. Page 1 of 2. Formerly known as Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology Journal. Read the latest articles of Food Research International at ScienceDirect.com, Elsevier's leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature.

  12. food research international Impact Factor, Ranking, publication fee

    Food Research International Quartile . The latest Quartile of food research international is Q1. Each subject category of journals is divided into four quartiles: Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4. Q1 is occupied by the top 25% of journals in the list; Q2 is occupied by journals in the 25 to 50% group; Q3 is occupied by journals in the 50 to 75% group and Q4 is ...

  13. International Food Research Journal

    » International Food Research Journal. Abbreviation: INT FOOD RES J ISSN: 1985-4668 eISSN: 2231-7546 Category / Quartile: FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY - SCIE(Q4) WoS Core Citation Indexes: ... Home Category & Quartile Countries & Regions Blog My Dashboard Membership About WJI

  14. International Food Research Journal

    The International Food Research Journal (IFRJ) publishes papers in English, six (6) issues a year. The scope of the Journal includes: Food chemistry. Food microbiology. Food safety. Food processing. Food engineering. Food quality. Food toxicology.

  15. International Food Research Journal

    The Impact IF 2022 of International Food Research Journal is 0.92, which is computed in 2023 as per its definition. International Food Research Journal IF is decreased by a factor of 0.37 and approximate percentage change is -28.68% when compared to preceding year 2021, which shows a falling trend.

  16. Association between modified youth healthy eating index and ...

    The research assistants guided the child's ... selected nutrients and food groups across quartiles of MYHEI are ... a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use ...

  17. Sustainability

    The innovation of this research lies in the application of the PCSO algorithm to dynamically manage inventory in real-time, aligning with sustainable inventory management practices. ... of some outliers with significantly high values, with the maximum and minimum values differing by about 375. The upper quartile is positioned lower, indicating ...

  18. China's Food Security Dream Faces Land, Soil and Water Woes

    China's soybean yields at 1.99 tons per hectare lag the 3.38 and 3.4 ton-yields in Brazil and the U.S., which have embraced genetically modified soybeans. But analysts say the government's target ...

  19. Insights

    Aims & scope. Food Research International provides a forum for the rapid dissemination of significant novel and high impact research in food science, technology, engineering and nutrition. The journal only publishes novel, high quality and high impact review papers, original research papers and letters to the …. View full aims & scope.

  20. ICTforAg 2024: Localizing impact

    May 28, 2024 - 9:00am to 5:00pm EDT. The ICTforAg 2024 covers a wide range of topics focused on localizing ICT to empower and engage small-scale producers in the global South. Our Washington, DC event explores the localization of ICT, responsible AI in agriculture, the potential for AI to increase farm profitability, empowering citizen science ...

  21. 628DirtRooster

    Welcome to the 628DirtRooster website where you can find video links to Randy McCaffrey's (AKA DirtRooster) YouTube videos, community support and other resources for the Hobby Beekeepers and the official 628DirtRooster online store where you can find 628DirtRooster hats and shirts, local Mississippi honey and whole lot more!

  22. PEKIN, Elektrostal

    Pekin. Review. Save. Share. 17 reviews #12 of 28 Restaurants in Elektrostal $$ - $$$ Asian. Lenina Ave., 40/8, Elektrostal 144005 Russia +7 495 120-35-45 Website + Add hours Improve this listing. See all (5) Enhance this page - Upload photos! Add a photo.

  23. RESTAURANT GLOBUS, Elektrostal

    Review. Share. 67 reviews. #2 of 28 Restaurants in Elektrostal $$ - $$$, European, Contemporary, Vegetarian Friendly. Fryazevskoye Hwy., 14, Elektrostal Russia. + Add phone number + Add website + Add hours Improve this listing. There aren't enough food, service, value or atmosphere ratings for Restaurant Globus yet.

  24. Applied Food Research

    Applied Food Research complements Elsevier food science Journals such as Food Research International, LWT and Journal of Food Engineering by offering a broader and more inclusive reach to cater for the increased spread of research interests. ... Quartile; Food Science: 2022: Q3: Food Science: 2023: Q1: SJR The SJR is a size-independent prestige ...

  25. 40 Facts About Elektrostal

    40 Facts About Elektrostal. Elektrostal is a vibrant city located in the Moscow Oblast region of Russia. With a rich history, stunning architecture, and a thriving community, Elektrostal is a city that has much to offer. Whether you are a history buff, nature enthusiast, or simply curious about different cultures, Elektrostal is sure to ...