• Cover Letter Tips

Should You Combine Your Cover Letter and Resume into One Document?

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The internet has impacted virtually every area of life, including the job search process. Gone are the days when a job seeker would simply hand an employer a cover letter and resume in paper form. Today, more companies than ever accept digital copies of those job search documents.

In fact, many companies and employers now only accept emailed digital cover letters and resumes so they can make use of applicant tracking systems (ATS). Unfortunately, there’s been little effort to standardize submission processes, and that can make it a little confusing for the average job seeker.

For example, how should you submit your emailed resume and cover letter? Should you send them separately or combine them into one document? In this post, we’ll examine both options and offer the advice you need to make the best decision.

What’s the difference between a cover letter and resume?

Before you decide whether to combine your cover letter and resume into one document, it is helpful to make sure that you fully understand each of these important tools. The fact is that each of these documents has its own role to play in the job search process, and they have some major differences:

Each of these documents serves a distinct purpose in the job search process. Resumes are designed to provide an employer with an easy way to quickly assess your qualifications. The main purpose of a cover letter is to help the employer understand your motivations, goals, and personality. Both are important documents, but they are not interchangeable.

Your cover letter should be a targeted document that focuses on your qualifications for a specific job role. It should contain information about why you are the best candidate for the position and what you hope to achieve for the employer if you are hired. Your resume is more of a marketing tool that highlights your skills, relevant work experience , and educational qualifications in an easily digested summarized format.

Structure and format

These two documents also have dramatically different structures and formats . Your resume will be divided into specific sections for easier consumption and will include bullet point lists of relevant skills and achievements. Cover letters look more like any other written communication, conveying your message in full sentences and paragraphs.

Cover letter and resume: to combine or not to combine?

Let’s get right to the main question here: should you combine your cover letter and resume into one document? As a general rule, you should try to avoid it wherever possible. Since resumes and cover letters serve two very different roles in the job search process, they should be treated as separate documents. The only time you should even consider combining these two documents is when the company has instructed you to do so.

Review the instructions

Whenever possible, it’s a good idea to get the submission guidelines for the position straight from the source. That means asking the company’s hiring manager how your resume and cover letter should be sent. If there are clear instructions, it’s important to follow them to the letter to maximize your chances of receiving the right type of attention. On those rare occasions when a company wants a combined document, the job posting will usually include that instruction.

Why you should not combine these two documents

In most instances, however, you will discover that the instructions are vague. Perhaps the only instruction is that your resume must be emailed. If that’s the case, then you should always choose to leave these two documents as separate files. There are several very good reasons to do so:

If you include these two tools in one document, applicant tracking systems may reject it. That can happen if the ATS mistakes your cover letter for a resume and assesses it based on its rules for resume approval.

Hiring managers often want to go directly to your resume to review your qualifications. If your cover letter is part of that document, it could be a distraction that frustrates your reader.

Your cover letter and resume serve different purposes. Keeping them separate helps to ensure that each document receives the attention it deserves.

What if employers request that your cover letter and resume be combined?

As we noted above, there may be times when a specific employer requests that a resume and cover letter be sent as one document. Obviously, that request should be honored if you want to be considered for an interview. The important thing then is to ensure that you combine them properly. The following tips can help:

Decide which document you want the employer to see first

Since the cover letter serves as your introduction, there is a case to be made for putting it in the front of the resume. If you want to make sure that the ATS scores your resume properly, however, you may want to put the resume at the beginning of the document. That can also help hiring managers quickly access your qualifications.

Create a new document

Make sure that you create an entirely new document for your combined file. That will enable you to keep them separate for other companies and submissions. Then copy and paste your resume and cover letter into this new document. Be sure to save the file with an appropriate file name. For example: JohnSmithResumeCoverLetter.docx or JohnSmithResumeCoverLetter.pdf.

Use proper formatting

When you paste each document into your combined file, make sure that you retain the original formatting. Also, be sure to include a page break at the end of the first document so that the next document begins on a fresh page.

Submit the combined file

Once you have your new combined file, submit it to the company. If the online job posting includes submission instructions, follow them to the letter. Otherwise, simply send it to the appropriate email address.

How to email your cover letter and resume

When emailing your cover letter and resume, either include the cover letter as an attachment or copy and paste its text into the email message. Don’t do both. 

It is generally recommended that you submit both the resume and cover letter as file attachments rather than having any part of them in the body of your email message. What you can include in the email text is confirmation that you have attached the resume and cover letter files.

Of course, you also need to decide whether you want to submit a Word document or a PDF file. Once again, review the job board instructions to see what the company is requesting. If there is no specific option listed, then the best thing to do is to submit each document in a Word file. 

Sample cover letter and resume template

Below, you will find a resume and cover letter template that you can use to ensure that your job search documents contain the information that employers want to see. You can use these templates to guide you as you create your own cover letter and resume:

Resume template

[Your first and last name]

[Your Phone number]

[Your Email address]

Professional Summary

[No more than three sentences highlighting your qualifications, experience, and achievements.]

Core Competencies

[Bullet point list of your relevant skills. Use multiple columns to list 12-15 top skills ]

Employment History

[Company name], [city], [state] | [Employment dates]

[Job title]

Job responsibility and achievement

[Repeat employment history for additional jobs, in reverse chronological order]

[Name of school], [city], [state]

[Degree], [major]

[Date you graduated] It should be noted that you don’t have to include education dates if you graduated more than one year ago. 

Certifications/Licenses

[Name of certification or license, organization providing it, and relevant dates]

Awards and Achievements

[Award, honor, achievement]

Cover letter template

[Your city and state]

[Recipient's first and last name]

[Company name]

[Company address]

Dear [Recipient's name],

My name is [your name] and I am interested in discussing the open [position name] position at your company. I have [length of experience] experience as a [your profession] and am confident that I can provide a great deal of value for your company if hired.

I have recently been employed at [relevant employer name], where I was responsible for [cite job duties using keywords that match the skills needed in the open position]. Prior to that, I [provide examples of job duties that show your qualifications to fill the company’s open job]. I would love to have the opportunity to use these skills as part of your team.

I have included my resume with this letter so that you can evaluate my qualifications and experience at your leisure. I appreciate your consideration and look forward to having the opportunity to discuss the position with you in greater detail.

Respectfully,

[Your name]

You should choose to send your cover letter and resume as separate documents, unless the company has instructed you to combine them into a single file. More importantly, make sure that you get those critical job search tools into the right hands so that you can increase your chances of landing an interview!

Want to know whether your resume has what it takes to capture a hiring manager’s interest? Get a free resume review from our team of experts today!

Recommended Reading:

How to Tailor Your Resume to Different Positions (Examples)

How long should a resume be in 2023?

How to Get Your Resume Past the ATS Scans

Ken Chase, Freelance Writer

During Ken's two decades as a freelance writer, he has covered everything from banking and fintech to business management and the entertainment industry. His true passion, however, has always been focused on helping others achieve their career goals with timely job search and interview advice or the occasional resume consultation. When he's not working, Ken can usually be found adventuring with family and friends or playing fetch with his demanding German Shepherd. Read more resume advice from Ken on  ZipJob’s blog .

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How To Match Your Cover Letter With Your Resume [With Examples]

A well-crafted cover letter and resume are essential for a successful job application, and understanding how these two documents should complement each other can significantly improve your chances of landing an interview. Creating a cohesive application package not only demonstrates your professionalism but also helps you stand out in a competitive job market. In this article, we'll explore:

  • The importance of a cohesive application package
  • The role of the cover letter in the application process
  • The role of the resume in the application process
  • Common concerns and questions job seekers have about the relationship between cover letters and resumes
  • An overview of the topics covered in the article

Design and Format Consistency

Ensuring your cover letter and resume have a consistent design and format is crucial for presenting a professional, visually appealing application package. A consistent design helps create a sense of control, familiarity, and reliability, as noted in this CareerFoundry article .

To achieve a cohesive design:

  • Choose a clean, easy-to-read layout: A well-organized layout makes it easier for hiring managers to quickly scan your documents and find relevant information.
  • Use the same font and font size across both documents: Consistency in typography creates a visually harmonious package and demonstrates attention to detail.
  • Align color schemes and design elements: Using a coordinated color palette and incorporating similar design elements, such as lines or icons, can make your application appear more polished.
  • Consider the impact of consistent design on the reader's perception: A well-designed application package conveys professionalism and can leave a lasting positive impression on the hiring manager.

Showcasing Your Personality

Your cover letter should highlight your unique personality and qualities that are not evident in your resume, setting you apart from other applicants. A resume focuses on your skills and professional experience, which may not convey your character and personal attributes. On the other hand, your cover letter provides an opportunity to showcase your communication style, voice, and relevant personal experiences.

For example:

After completing my degree in environmental science, I spent a year volunteering with a local conservation group to protect our community's natural habitats. This experience deepened my passion for protecting the environment and inspired me to pursue a career in sustainability.

By sharing your passion and enthusiasm for the role, you can demonstrate your genuine interest in the position and create a memorable impression on the hiring manager.

Addressing Red Flags

Your cover letter can serve as a valuable tool for addressing potential concerns or red flags in your resume, providing additional context and explanation. Common resume red flags may include employment gaps, frequent job changes, or unconventional career paths. When addressing these concerns in your cover letter:

  • Be honest and transparent about your situation.
  • Explain any personal or professional growth that resulted from these experiences.
  • Provide context for your career choices and demonstrate how they have contributed to your skill set.

For instance:

While my resume may show a gap in employment, I took that time to care for an ill family member. This experience taught me invaluable skills in time management, empathy, and resilience, which I believe will make me a stronger candidate for this position.

Customizing for the Specific Job Position

Customizing your cover letter for the specific job position and company you are applying for is essential for demonstrating your fit for the role and your genuine interest in the company. To tailor your cover letter:

  • Research the company and job position: Familiarize yourself with the company's values, mission, and goals, as well as the skills and qualifications required for the role.
  • Identify key skills and qualifications required for the role: As mentioned in this Indeed article , analyze your skill set and match it with the job requirements.
  • Address these requirements in your cover letter: Explain how your experience and skills make you an ideal candidate for the position.
  • Use company-specific language and terminology: This demonstrates your familiarity with the company and its industry.

Avoid using generic templates and create a customized cover letter for each application to show that you have taken the time to research and understand the specific job opportunity.

Connecting with the Company

Your cover letter should demonstrate your understanding of the company's values, mission, and goals, and how your skills and experience align with these factors. To establish a genuine connection with the company:

  • Research the company's values, mission, and goals: Use resources like the company's website, press releases, and social media accounts to gather information.
  • Identify your own values and goals that align with the company: Reflect on your personal and professional aspirations and how they relate to the company's mission.
  • Demonstrate how your experience and skills will contribute to the company's success: Explain how your background will add value to the organization.
  • Express enthusiasm for the company's products or services: Show your genuine interest in what the company does and how it aligns with your passions.

Examples Of How To Match Your Resume With Your Cover Letter

When crafting your job application materials, it's crucial to ensure your cover letter and resume complement each other. They should serve as two parts of a whole, providing a complete and compelling portrait of your skills, experiences, and professional history. Here are a few ways to match your resume with your cover letter effectively:

1. Tailored Skills Highlighting:

In your resume, you've listed down your technical and soft skills, such as team management, Python programming, or business analytics. When you write your cover letter, refer back to these skills and give concrete examples. If your resume states, "Proficient in Python," your cover letter might include a story of how you used Python to streamline a business process, boosting efficiency by 30%.

2. Reinforcing Achievements:

Your cover letter is a chance to flesh out the notable achievements listed in your resume. For instance, if your resume states, "Increased sales by 20% over a fiscal year," your cover letter could detail how you motivated the team, developed a sales strategy, and persevered through market challenges to achieve this.

3. Echoing the Professional Summary:

Your resume's professional summary is a snapshot of your career. In your cover letter, you can echo this summary in a narrative form. For example, if your summary describes you as a "Dedicated financial analyst with a passion for data-driven strategies," you might begin your cover letter with a story that shows this passion in action.

4. Expanding on Key Experiences:

A resume often contains bullet points about job duties and responsibilities. In your cover letter, select a few of these key experiences and describe them in more depth. If your resume says, "Managed a team of 10 sales associates," your cover letter might tell a story about a challenging time when your leadership skills really made a difference.

5. Mirroring Language and Tone:

Your resume and cover letter should not only share content but also style. If your resume is written in a formal, professional tone, maintain this in your cover letter. If your resume uses specific industry jargon or phrases from the job listing, mirror this language in your cover letter.

Remember, while your cover letter and resume should complement each other, they shouldn't be carbon copies. The cover letter allows you to show a bit more of your personality and to highlight your suitability for the role in a story-like format. In contrast, your resume offers a structured, concise overview of your skills, experiences, and achievements. By thoughtfully aligning these two documents, you can present a powerful and consistent professional brand.

Final Tips and Best Practices

By following some final tips and best practices, you can ensure your cover letter and resume are cohesive, professional, and compelling:

  • Proofread and edit both documents for grammar, spelling, and formatting errors.
  • Seek feedback from trusted friends, mentors, or professional resume services.
  • Utilize online resources and templates to guide your cover letter and resume creation, such as Harvard College's guide or HigherEdJobs' resources .
  • Continuously update and improve your application materials as you gain experience and skills.
  • Stay informed about industry trends and expectations for job applications.

By understanding how your cover letter and resume should complement each other and following the strategies outlined in this article, you can create a polished, professional application package that stands out to potential employers. Investing time and effort in crafting cohesive application materials can significantly improve your chances of landing an interview and advancing your career. We encourage you to continue refining your cover letter and resume skills and wish you success in your job search. If you have any additional tips or experiences with matching cover letters and resumes, please share them with us!

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Should you staple your resume & cover letter together.

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Most resume writing professionals advise against stapling your cover letter to your resume. (See Reference 3.) While it is important to keep both these documents together, generally an employer will read the cover letter and want to throw it away, keeping the resume if he plans to interview you.

Best Option

If the cover letter and/or resume are more than a page, the whole package will appear quite unorganized. For a very professional look, consider presenting or mailing your cover letter and resume in a folder. If you have letters of recommendation, a portfolio of projects or other documents, those would go in first (meaning the last things that would be seen when opening the folder). Then place your resume, then the cover letter. You would either hand the folder to the employer or mail the package in a 9 by 12 inch envelope. Don’t fold it in thirds and stuff it into a small envelope. Be sure the heading of the cover letter is upright.

Staples vs. Paper Clips

If your resume is more than one page, some experts suggest that you can staple these together since it is really one document. You might consider paper-clipping them, especially if the second page includes only information such as education and degrees, since the employer may only be interested in your contact information and work history.

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  • Cover Letter Writing 101

Daryn Edelman, a professional writer/lecturer in spirituality, mysticism, business ethics, culture and politics since 1999. He has written scripts for "The Chabad Telethon" and diverse articles featured in "Farbregen Magazine" and Chabad.com. He graduated from the University of California Los Angeles with a Bachelor of Arts in religious studies and the University of Liverpool with a Master of Arts in English.

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How to Attach a Cover Letter to a Resume When You Have to Use an Employer Website

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Email format for a follow-up resume, job hunting taglines.

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Including a cover letter with your resume shows off your communication and writing skills. The online job application is convenient and expeditious for both employers and job seekers alike. Still, job seekers shouldn't underestimate the importance of including a cover letter.

It helps to have a deeper understanding of the online application process from the employer's perspective, in addition to what you see on the computer screen as a job seeker.

Applicant Tracking Systems

Applicant tracking systems are software programs that hiring managers and human resources professionals use to field job applications, explains Jobscan.com . ATS programs may scan both your resume and cover letter documents for keywords that match the qualifications and skills that are required for a particular job opening. Employers need to be able to search cover letters, in addition to resumes.

For example, some applicants expound on technology in the cover letter that is important for the current job opening. After you attach the cover letter to the resume during the application process, the ATS program may be putting the document to use by picking out related keywords from sentences and paragraphs.

Re-Read Employer Instructions

Many hiring employers will post clear and detailed instructions or a Frequently Asked Questions section next to the advertised job opening online. Miss one detail and your job application could be thrown out of contention. In particular, many employers require that your cover letter and resume be written for a specific job opening or requisition.

If you are applying for multiple open positions within the same organization, be prepared to write multiple tailored cover letters. If you are unsure about the cover-letter submission instructions, politely call or email the hiring manager for clarification.

In many cases you only get one chance to apply and get everything correct. ATS systems may store your rejected application for an unspecified period of time, and you may have to wait before you can reapply.

Prepare Your Letter First

Avoid typing a cover letter into an online application form so that you can take a break and re-read it with fresh eyes after 30 minutes or so. Type your cover letter first in a word processing program for proofreading purposes. Use the built-in grammar and spell-checking functions to clean up your final document.

Again, the cover letter shows off your writing skills, which is vital in many career fields. Stick with the conventional cover letter format, including your contact information, the recipient's contact information, salutation, three-paragraph body and closing. Avoid fancy fonts, odd-looking margins and bullets.

Some employers request documents in the plain-text or ASCII format. Name and save this document to your hard drive. Use a professional name, such as "Jane Doe: Cover Letter," because the file name may appear in the employer's ATS system.

Attaching and Submitting

Some employer websites support attaching separate cover letter and resume documents during the application process. Simply click the "Browse" or similarly labeled button next to each option. Find the documents by name on your hard drive and upload each to the website.

Other employers might request that you send a cover letter and resume as one attachment, and you'll need to combine both documents into single document. In this case, you will need to open both documents and then copy and paste the text from the cover letter above the contact information in your resume document. Use a page break to keep the cover letter on page 1 and the resume on page 2. Afterwards, browse for the combined document on the hard drive and upload it to the employer's website. Many online applications will display some type of status message, such as "Upload Complete" or "Upload Successful."

Many recruiters don't even bother to read cover letters, and instead proceed straight to resumes. Small companies might accept your cover letter in the body of an email if your resume is attached.

  • Jobscan: Applicant Tracking System
  • Indeed: How To Send an Email Cover Letter
  • Career One Stop.org: Cover Letter Template
  • Microsoft Office: Word: Demo -- Add and Remove Page Breaks
  • Resume Power.com: Resume File Types -- MS Word, Plain-Text, and Adobe PDFs

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should i combine my cover letter and resume

Keep cover letters with your resume in Word

Job hunting electronically requires finesse. Keeping your cover letter with your resume , in a single document lessens the chance of losing that impressive letter, and it's easier for a potential employer to print. Here is one way to optimize your time and, maybe, impress a hiring manager.

Creating sections for a cover letter and resume

To keep your cover letter and your resume together, you can create them in the same document and use a separate section, with different information and formatting , for each.

Note:  You can use the same technique to create title pages, tables of contents, and other pages where you want different margins and headers and footers.

Insert a section break

Go to File > Options .

Select > Display .

Under Always show these formatting marks on the screen , select Paragraph marks .

Click or tap where you want to insert a section break for your cover letter.

Go to Layout (or Page layout for 2013), and select the down arrow next to Breaks .

Under Section Breaks , select Next Page .

Cover letter header

Cover letter footer

Resume header

Section break

Make the header and footer different from the previous section

Select the first page of the resume (not cover letter).

Go to Insert > Header .

Select Edit Header .

Click or tap anywhere in the header, and select Link to Previous to clear it.

Select Close Header and Footer .

Start your resume headers and footers on the second page of your resume

Select the second page of the resume .

Click or tap anywhere in the header, and select Different First Page .

Use different layouts for your cover letter and your resume

Set the layout for your cover letter, and then select the first page of your resume.

Dialog Box Launcher

Under Apply to , select This point forward .

Make your layout changes and select OK .

Resume footer

About the author      Karen Hofferber is a Certified Professional Resume Writer and senior resume writer at ResumePower.com. Changing careers? See The Career Change Resume by Kim Isaacs and Karen Hofferber for help. You can contact Karen at ResumePower.com.

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How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

Background Image

After weeks of heavy job searching, you’re almost there!

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send in your application and call it a day, you remember that you need to write a cover letter too.

So now, you’re stuck staring at a blank page, wondering where to start...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think. 

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve.

We're going to cover:

What Is a Cover Letter?

  • How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter, Step by Step
  • 15+ Job-Winning Cover Letter Examples

Let’s get started.

A cover letter is a document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume or CV.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, it should be around 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter is supposed to impress the hiring manager and convince them you’re worth interviewing as a candidate.

So, how can your cover letter achieve this?

First of all, it should complement your resume, not copy it. Your cover letter is your chance to elaborate on important achievements, skills, or anything else that your resume doesn’t give you the space to cover. 

For example, if you have an employment gap on your resume, the cover letter is a great place to explain why it happened and how it helped you grow as a person. 

If this is your first time writing a cover letter, writing about yourself might seem complicated. But don’t worry—you don’t need to be super creative or even a good writer .

All you have to do is follow this tried and tested cover letter structure:

structure of a cover letter

  • Header. Add all the necessary contact information at the top of your cover letter.
  • Formal greeting. Choose an appropriate way to greet your target audience.
  • Introduction. Introduce yourself in the opening paragraph and explain your interest in the role.
  • Body. Elaborate on why you’re the best candidate for the job and a good match for the company. Focus on “selling” your skills, achievements, and relevant professional experiences.
  • Conclusion. Summarize your key points and wrap it up professionally.

Now, let’s take a look at an example of a cover letter that follows our structure perfectly:

How to Write a Cover Letter

New to cover letter writing? Give our cover letter video a watch before diving into the article!

When Should You Write a Cover Letter?

You should always include a cover letter in your job application, even if the hiring manager never reads it. Submitting a cover letter is as important as submitting a resume if you want to look like a serious candidate.

If the employer requests a cover letter as part of the screening process, not sending one is a huge red flag and will probably get your application tossed into the “no” pile immediately.

On the other hand, if the job advertisement doesn’t require a cover letter from the candidates, adding one shows you went the extra mile.

Putting in the effort to write a cover letter can set you apart from other candidates with similar professional experience and skills, and it could even sway the hiring manager to call you for an interview if you do it right.

Need to write a letter to help get you into a good school or volunteer program? Check out our guide to learn how to write a motivation letter !

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

Now that you know what a cover letter is, it’s time to learn how to write one!

We’ll go through the process in detail, step by step.

#1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, stylish template?

cover letter templates for 2024

Just choose one of our hand-picked cover letter templates , and you’ll be all set in no time!

As a bonus, our intuitive AI will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter as you write it. You’ll have the perfect cover letter done in minutes!

cover letter templates

#2. Put Contact Information in the Header

As with a resume, it’s important to 

start your cover letter

 with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter’s header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text.

Contact Information on Cover Letter

Here, you want to include all the essential contact information , including:

  • Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top.
  • Job Title. Match the professional title underneath your name to the exact job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Email Address. Always use a professional and easy-to-spell email address. Ideally, it should combine your first and last names.
  • Phone Number. Add a number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country, no need for more details.
  • Relevant Links (optional). You can add links to websites or social media profiles that are relevant to your field. Examples include a LinkedIn profile , Github, or an online portfolio.

Then it’s time to add the recipient’s contact details, such as:

  • Hiring Manager's Name. If you can find the name of the hiring manager, add it.
  • Hiring Manager's Title. While there’s no harm in writing “hiring manager,” if they’re the head of the department, we recommend you use that title accordingly.
  • Company Name. Make sure to write the name of the company you're applying to.
  • Location. The city and state/country are usually enough information here, too.
  • Date of Writing (Optional). You can include the date you wrote your cover letter for an extra professional touch.

matching resume and cover letter

#3. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed all the contact information, it’s time to start writing the content of the cover letter.

The first thing you need to do here is to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager.

In fact, you want to address the hiring manager personally .

Forget the old “Dear Sir or Madam” or the impersonal “To Whom It May Concern.” You want to give your future boss a good impression and show them that you did your research before sending in your application.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes something sticks with their generic approach

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager?

First, check the job ad. The hiring manager’s name might be listed somewhere in it.

If that doesn’t work, check the company’s LinkedIn page. You just need to look up the head of the relevant department you’re applying to, and you’re all set.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer.

Here’s what you should look for on LinkedIn:

linkedin search cco

And there you go! You have your hiring manager.

But let’s say you’re applying for a position as a server . In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager” or “food and beverage manager.”

If the results don’t come up with anything, try checking out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Make sure to address them as Mr. or Ms., followed by their last name. If you’re not sure about their gender or marital status, you can just stick to their full name, like so:

  • Dear Mr. Kurtuy,
  • Dear Andrei Kurtuy,

But what if you still can’t find the hiring manager’s name, no matter where you look?

No worries. You can direct your cover letter to the company, department, or team as a whole, or just skip the hiring manager’s name.

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear [Company Name]

Are you applying for a research position? Learn how to write an academic personal statement .

#4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Hiring managers get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The biggest problem with most opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Here’s an example:

  • My name is Jonathan, and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a Sales Manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

And do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start with some of your top achievements to grab the reader’s attention. And to get the point across, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

Your opening paragraph should also show the hiring manager a bit about why you want this specific job. For example, mention how the job relates to your plans for the future or how it can help you grow professionally. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not just applying left and right—you’re actually enthusiastic about getting this particular role.

Now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Dear Mr. Smith,

My name’s Michael, and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked as a Sales Representative with Company X, another fin-tech company , for 3+ years, where I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month and beat the KPIs by around 40%. I believe that my previous industry experience, passion for finance , and excellence in sales make me the right candidate for the job.

The second candidate starts with what they can do for the company in the future and immediately lists an impressive and relevant achievement. Since they’re experienced in the same industry and interested in finance, the hiring manager can see they’re not just a random applicant.

From this introduction, it’s safe to say that the hiring manager would read the rest of this candidate’s cover letter.

#5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details

The next part of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what sets you apart as a qualified candidate for the job.

The main thing you need to remember here is that you shouldn’t make it all about yourself . Your cover letter is supposed to show the hiring manager how you relate to the job and the company you’re applying to.

No matter how cool you make yourself sound in your cover letter, if you don’t tailor it to match what the hiring manager is looking for, you’re not getting an interview.

To get this right, use the job ad as a reference when writing your cover letter. Make sure to highlight skills and achievements that match the job requirements, and you’re good to go.

Since this part of your cover letter is by far the longest, you should split it into at least two paragraphs.

Here’s what each paragraph should cover:

Explain Why You’re the Perfect Candidate for the Role

Before you can show the hiring manager that you’re exactly what they’ve been looking for, you need to know what it is they’re looking for.

Start by doing a bit of research. Learn what the most important skills and responsibilities of the role are according to the job ad, and focus on any relevant experience you have that matches them.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. The top requirements on the job ad are:

  • Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of $10,000+ / month
  • Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  • Excellent copywriting skills

So, in the body of your cover letter, you need to show how you meet these requirements. Here’s an example of what that can look like:

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $40,000+ . As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. I created the ad copy and images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

Our example addresses all the necessary requirements and shows off the candidate’s relevant skills.

Are you a student applying for your first internship? Learn how to write an internship cover letter with our dedicated guide.

Explain Why You’re a Good Fit for the Company

As skilled and experienced as you may be, that’s not all the hiring manager is looking for.

They also want someone who’s a good fit for their company and who actually wants to work there.

Employees who don’t fit in with the company culture are likely to quit sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary , so hiring managers vet candidates very carefully to avoid this scenario.

So, you have to convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about working with them.

Start by doing some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company’s product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the company’s culture like?

Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or on job-search websites like Jobscan or Glassdoor.

Then, pick your favorite thing about the company and talk about it in your cover letter.

But don’t just describe the company in its own words just to flatter them. Be super specific—the hiring manager can see through any fluff.

For example, if you’re passionate about their product and you like the company’s culture of innovation and independent work model, you can write something like:

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features, such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2, were real game changers for the device.

I really admire how Company XYZ strives for excellence in all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone who thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I’ll be a great match for your Product Design team.

So, make sure to do your fair share of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying to that specific company.

Is the company you want to work for not hiring at the moment? Check out our guide to writing a letter of interest .

#6. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Finally, it’s time to conclude your cover letter.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't make in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? If there’s any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision, mention it here. If not, just recap your key selling points so far, such as key skills and expertise.
  • Express gratitude. Politely thanking the hiring manager for their time is always a good idea.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. This means you should ask the hiring manager to do something, like call you and discuss your application or arrange an interview.
  • Remember to sign your cover letter. Just add a formal closing line and sign your name at the bottom.

Here’s an example of how to end your cover letter :

I hope to help Company X make the most of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your Facebook marketing goals. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided email address or phone number so that we may arrange an interview.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alice Richards

Feel free to use one of these other popular closing lines for your cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Once you’re done with your cover letter, it’s time to check if it meets all industry requirements. 

Give our handy cover letter writing checklist a look to make sure:

Does your cover letter heading include all essential information?

  • Professional Email
  • Phone Number
  • Relevant Links

Do you address the right person? 

  • The hiring manager in the company
  • Your future direct supervisor
  • The company/department in general

Does your introductory paragraph grab the reader's attention?

  • Did you mention some of your top achievements?
  • Did you use numbers and facts to back up your experience?
  • Did you convey enthusiasm for the specific role?

Do you show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

  • Did you identify the core requirements for the role?
  • Did you show how your experiences helped you fit the requirements perfectly?

Do you convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the company you’re applying to?

  • Did you identify the top 3 things that you like about the company?
  • Did you avoid generic reasons for explaining your interest in the company?

Did you conclude your cover letter properly?

  • Did you recap your key selling points in the conclusion?
  • Did you end your cover letter with a call to action?
  • Did you use the right formal closing line and sign your name?

15 Cover Letter Tips

Now you’re all set to write your cover letter! 

Before you start typing, here are some cover letter tips to help take your cover letter to the next level:

  • Customize Your Cover Letter for Each Job. Make sure your cover letter is tailored to the job you're applying for. This shows you're not just sending generic applications left and right, and it tells the hiring manager you’re the right person for the job.
  • Showcase Your Skills. Talk about how your skills meet the company’s needs. And while your hard skills should be front and center, you shouldn’t underestimate your soft skills in your cover letter either.
  • Avoid Fluff. Don’t make any generic statements you can’t back up. The hiring manager can tell when you’re just throwing words around, and it doesn’t make your cover letter look good.
  • Use Specific Examples. Instead of saying you're great at something, give an actual example to back up your claim. Any data you can provide makes you sound more credible, so quantify your achievements. For example, give numbers such as percentages related to your performance and the timeframe it took to accomplish certain achievements.
  • Research the Company. Always take time to learn about the company you're applying to. Make sure to mention something about them in your cover letter to show the hiring manager that you're interested.
  • Follow the Application Instructions. If the job posting asks for something specific in your cover letter or requires a certain format, make sure you include it. Not following instructions can come off as unattentive or signal to the hiring manager that you’re not taking the job seriously.
  • Use the Right Template and Format. Choose the right cover letter format and adapt your cover letter’s look to the industry you’re applying for. For example, if you’re aiming for a job in Law or Finance, you should go for a cleaner, more professional look. But if you’re applying for a field that values innovation, like IT or Design, you have more room for creativity.
  • Express Your Enthusiasm. Let the hiring manager know why you're excited about the job. Your passion for the specific role or the field in general can be a big selling point, and show them that you’re genuinely interested, not just applying left and right.
  • Address Any Gaps. If there are any employment gaps in your resume , your cover letter is a great place to mention why. Your resume doesn’t give you enough space to elaborate on an employment gap, so addressing it here can set hiring managers at ease—life happens, and employers understand.
  • Avoid Quirky Emails. Your email address should be presentable. It’s hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is “[email protected].” Just use a [email protected] format.
  • Check Your Contact Information. Typos in your email address or phone number can mean a missed opportunity. Double-check these before sending your application.
  • Mention if You Want to Relocate. If you’re looking for a job that lets you move somewhere else, specify this in your cover letter.
  • Keep It Brief. You want to keep your cover letter short and sweet. Hiring managers don’t have time to read a novel, so if you go over one page, they simply won’t read it at all.
  • Use a Professional Tone. Even though a conversational tone isn’t a bad thing, remember that it's still a formal document. Show professionalism in your cover letter by keeping slang, jargon, and emojis out of it.
  • Proofread Carefully. Typos and grammar mistakes are a huge deal-breaker. Use a tool like Grammarly or QuillBot to double-check your spelling and grammar, or even get a friend to check it for you.

15+ Cover Letter Examples

Need some inspiration? Check out some perfect cover letter examples for different experience levels and various professions.

5+ Cover Letter Examples by Experience

#1. college student cover letter example.

college or student cover letter example

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#2. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Middle Management Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a project manager cover letter here.

#3. Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#4. Career Change Cover Letter Example

Career Change Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to a career change resume and cover letter here.

#5. Management Cover Letter Example

Management Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a management cover letter here.

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an executive resume here.

9+ Cover Letter Examples by Profession

#1. it cover letter example.

IT Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

#2. Consultant Cover Letter Example

Consultant Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#3. Human Resources Cover Letter

Human Resources Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a human resources cover letter here.

#4. Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business cover letter here.

#5. Sales Cover Letter Example

Sales Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales cover letter here.

#6. Social Worker Cover Letter

Social Worker Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a social worker cover letter here.

#7. Lawyer Cover Letter

Lawyer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a lawyer cover letter here.

#8. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an administrative assistant cover letter here.

#9. Engineering Cover Letter Example

Engineering Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineer cover letter here.

#10. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist cover letter here.

Need more inspiration? Check out these cover letter examples to learn what makes them stand out.

Plug & Play Cover Letter Template

Not sure how to start your cover letter? Don’t worry!

Just copy and paste our free cover letter template into the cover letter builder, and swap out the blanks for your details.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Profession]

[Your Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

[Your Location]

[Your LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

[Your Personal Website URL (optional)]

[Recipient's Name, e.g., Jane Doe],

[Recipient's Position, e.g., Hiring Manager]

[Company Name, e.g., ABC Corporation]

[Company Address]

[City, State/Country]

Dear [Recipient's Name],

As a seasoned [Your Profession] with [Number of Years of Experience] years of industry experience, I am eager to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my experience in [Your Industry/Sector] and the successes I've achieved throughout my education and career, I believe I can bring unique value and creativity to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I've taken the lead on more than [Number of Projects/Assignments] projects, some valued up to $[Highest Project Value]. I pride myself on consistently exceeding client expectations and have successfully [Mention a Key Achievement] in just a [Amount of Time] through [Skill] and [Skill].

I've collaborated with various professionals, such as [List Roles], ensuring that all [projects/tasks] meet [relevant standards or objectives]. This hands-on experience, coupled with my dedication to understanding each [client's/customer's] vision, has equipped me to navigate and deliver on complex projects.

My key strengths include:

  • Improving [Achievement] by [%] over [Amount of Time] which resulted in [Quantified Result].
  • Optimizing [Work Process/Responsibility] which saved [Previous Employer] [Amount of Time/Budget/Other Metric] over [Weeks/Months/Years]
  • Spearheading team of [Number of People] to [Task] and achieving [Quantified Result].

Alongside this letter, I've attached my resume. My educational background, a [Your Degree] with a concentration in [Your Specialization], complements the practical skills that I'm particularly eager to share with [Company Name].

I'm excited about the possibility of contributing to [Something Notable About the Company or Its Mission]. I'd be grateful for the chance to delve deeper into how my expertise aligns with your needs.

Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

The Heart of Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application falls through.

After all, your cover letter is meant to complement your resume. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression in your cover letter, only for the hiring manager to never read it because your resume was mediocre.

But don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here, too.

Check out our dedicated guide on how to make a resume and learn everything you need to know to land your dream job!

Just pick one of our resume templates and start writing your own job-winning resume.

resume examples for cover letters

Key Takeaways

Now that we’ve walked you through all the steps of writing a cover letter, let’s summarize everything we’ve learned:

  • A cover letter is a 250 - 400 word document that’s meant to convince the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job.
  • Your job application should always include a cover letter alongside your resume.
  • To grab the hiring manager’s attention, write a strong opening paragraph. Mention who you are, why you’re applying, and a standout achievement to pique their interest.
  • Your cover letter should focus on why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you’re passionate about working in this specific company.
  • Use the body of your cover letter to provide details on your skills, achievements, and qualifications, as well as make sure to convey your enthusiasm throughout your whole cover letter.
  • Recap your key selling points towards the end of your cover letter, and end it with a formal closing line and your full name signed underneath.

At Novorésumé, we’re committed to helping you get the job you deserve every step of the way! 

Follow our career blog for more valuable advice, or check out some of our top guides, such as:

  • How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide
  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers [Full List]

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Resume.io updates resume.io

Merge resumes and cover letters into one pdf file, new feature.

PDF exports have become even more flexible! With our latest update, you can now merge your resume and cover letter into a single PDF file for added convenience.

This way, you can not only avoid clutter and find your professional files more easily, but also streamline your job applications. Send your professional story in a single PDF document for the recruiter’s convenience, as well as your own.

You can find this new function in the dropdown menu under “More” to the right of your resume/cover letter preview. Then, simply choose which two documents to combine and you’re good to go!

Step 1 Step 2

Make sure your cover letter and resume go hand in hand and are never missed. We are committed to always expanding our feature list, so stay tuned for future updates!

should i combine my cover letter and resume

should i combine my cover letter and resume

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How do I upload a cover letter and resume as one document?

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Stefan Blom

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  • Article Author

You can save your résumé in PDF format (Word offers a PDF option in the Save As dialog) and then use a split/merge application to combine your various PDFs. (An example of PDF split/merge applications is Gios PDF Splitter and Merger; see  http://www.paologios.com/products/?type=bin .)

Text documents, in this context, is probably referring to  plain text documents, the ones that NotePad can open.

Stefan Blom Microsoft Word MVP

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Rohn007

Open the 2 doc files

<CTL A> to select all text in one document, the <CTL C> to copy it

go to second document

<CTL END> to jump to the end of the doc

<CTL V> to paste the copied document

you now have 2 of the documents in one.

save as the combined document to a new name as a "DOC" format file

move the cursor to the place you want to put the PDF file

Insert tab / Text group / Object ddl / select Object to display Object dialog / Create from File tab / browse to locate your PDF file (do NOT click on Link to File)

it will take a little time, but a PDF icon will eventually display in your document. The pdf is now embedded in the doc file.  If the file name is not readable, type the file name in beside the icon and maybe include instruction something like this "Double click the icon to open this file"

You now have all three files in one, saved as a DOC format file.

43 people found this reply helpful

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Combine a Cover Letter and Resume Into One Document

    3. Open a new document. To begin combining your resume and cover letter into a single document, start a new file on your computer in your preferred application or platform. Choose a file name that's professional and use your full name without any numbers to differentiate your application from the candidate pool.

  2. Should You Combine Your Cover Letter and Resume into One Document

    Create a new document. Make sure that you create an entirely new document for your combined file. That will enable you to keep them separate for other companies and submissions. Then copy and paste your resume and cover letter into this new document. Be sure to save the file with an appropriate file name.

  3. Make one file of both resume and cover letter? Or serapately?

    It sounds counterintuitive, but if they only ask for a resume, then that's probably what they want to look at first and then read the cover letter afterwards. If you try to upload both files separately into one section, then you run the risk of replacing your resume file with the cover letter, or vice versa.

  4. How To Match Your Cover Letter With Your Resume [With Examples]

    In your cover letter, select a few of these key experiences and describe them in more depth. If your resume says, "Managed a team of 10 sales associates," your cover letter might tell a story about a challenging time when your leadership skills really made a difference. 5. Mirroring Language and Tone:

  5. Should You Staple Your Resume & Cover Letter Together?

    Writer. Photo Credits. Most resume writing professionals advise against stapling your cover letter to your resume. (See Reference 3.) While it is important to keep both these documents together, generally an employer will read the cover letter and want to throw it away, keeping the resume if he plans to interview you.

  6. Should You Include a Cover Letter? With Expert Tips

    Here are some benefits of including a cover letter in your job application: 1. They showcase your personality. Cover letters typically reveal insights into a candidate's values, character traits and outlook on work. Many hiring managers prefer candidates who align with the organization's culture, so highlighting your unique personality in your ...

  7. How to Attach a Cover Letter to a Resume When You Have to Use an ...

    Use a page break to keep the cover letter on page 1 and the resume on page 2. Afterwards, browse for the combined document on the hard drive and upload it to the employer's website. Many online applications will display some type of status message, such as "Upload Complete" or "Upload Successful." Many recruiters don't even bother to read cover ...

  8. How to Make Your Cover Letter and Resume Match

    1 Use the same format and style. One way to make your cover letter and resume match is to use the same format and style for both documents. This means choosing a clear and professional font ...

  9. What is the Relationship Between My Resume and Cover Letter?

    A cover letter will use paragraphs, and the tone is much more personal than a resume. It's great to let your personality shine through, and you should focus on how you can meet the employer's needs. You should to select the most relevant, persuasive parts of your resume, emphasize them and provide additional detail.

  10. How to Write a Combination Resume (With Example!)

    Relevant/key skills: The first half of the main show in a combination resume, this is where you list your key skills that are relevant to the role you're applying for. See below for a few different possible approaches to this section. Work history: The second act in a combination resume is a list of your past roles, with responsibilities and ...

  11. Keep cover letters with your resume in Word

    Insert a section break. Go to File > Options. Select > Display. Under Always show these formatting marks on the screen, select Paragraph marks. Click or tap where you want to insert a section break for your cover letter. Go to Layout (or Page layout for 2013), and select the down arrow next to Breaks. Under Section Breaks, select Next Page.

  12. Should I Use the Same Template for Cover Letter and Resume?

    Choosing a professional resume template and using a similar template for your cover letter is the best way to create a coherent, polished job application. And yes, cover letters are necessary! As a bonus, a well-designed template will prompt you on what to include in your resume and what a cover letter should look like .

  13. Should Your Cover Letter and Resume Templates Match?

    Your Cover Letter and Resume Should Match. A well-written cover letter should complement your resume in style and content. Be sure all of these elements match when you create your cover letter and resume together: Color. Font and font size. Layout, including margins and paragraph spacing. Contact information. An easy way to make sure your cover ...

  14. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    start your cover letter. with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter's header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text. Here, you want to include all the essential contact information, including: Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top. Job Title.

  15. What to Include in a Cover Letter (& What to Leave Out)

    A great cover letter consists of the following components: 1. Your name and contact information in a header. The hiring manager needs to have your contact information. Without these details, they have no way of inviting you for an interview. The most eye-catching way of adding your contact information to your cover letter is by creating a large ...

  16. Cover Letter and Resume in One Document

    No. Your resume should talk about your qualifications; your cover letter should talk about why you fit this particular position. Your resume should be bullet-points that can be skimmed at a glance; your cover letter should be written as a letter and go into detail about a few parts of your background to show why you'd be excellent in the position.

  17. Shall I combine my resume and cover letter? : r/resumes

    Shall I combine my resume and cover letter? While applying on Indeed it only allows you to add resume for most advertisements . Do you think its a good idea to combine both resume and cover letter in a single pdf file with cover letter at the beginning followed by resume? ehh nah, I think just the resume is fine. No.

  18. How to Put Together a Resume in 8 Steps

    Here are eight easy steps you can take to put together a resume quickly: 1. Identify qualifications that align with the job description. The best resumes are the ones that are tailored specifically for the job that you're applying for. Start the process of creating your resume by carefully reviewing the job description for the position.

  19. Merge resumes and cover letters into one PDF file!

    Send your professional story in a single PDF document for the recruiter's convenience, as well as your own. You can find this new function in the dropdown menu under "More" to the right of your resume/cover letter preview. Then, simply choose which two documents to combine and you're good to go! Step 1 Step 2.

  20. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    2. Include a greeting. In your research, try to find the name of the person reviewing applications for the job. Address your letter to this person with a common business greeting, such as "Dear [first and last name]" or "Dear [position title]." Avoid using "To whom it may concern."

  21. Should I combine Cover Letter and Resume? : r/jobs

    Reply. Sleepyslothbear • 3 yr. ago. 'You aren't required to upload a resume' is a strange one...! If it's clear why you're suitable for the role, probably wouldn't combine. But if you want to highlight how you meet their requirements, no harm in including. 1. Reply. maora34 • 3 yr. ago. Cover letters in 2k20 lul.

  22. How do I upload a cover letter and resume as one document?

    Open the 2 doc files. <CTL A> to select all text in one document, the <CTL C> to copy it. go to second document. <CTL END> to jump to the end of the doc. <CTL V> to paste the copied document. you now have 2 of the documents in one. save as the combined document to a new name as a "DOC" format file.