The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Application Essays

What this handout is about.

This handout will help you write and revise the personal statement required by many graduate programs, internships, and special academic programs.

Before you start writing

Because the application essay can have a critical effect upon your progress toward a career, you should spend significantly more time, thought, and effort on it than its typically brief length would suggest. It should reflect how you arrived at your professional goals, why the program is ideal for you, and what you bring to the program. Don’t make this a deadline task—now’s the time to write, read, rewrite, give to a reader, revise again, and on until the essay is clear, concise, and compelling. At the same time, don’t be afraid. You know most of the things you need to say already.

Read the instructions carefully. One of the basic tasks of the application essay is to follow the directions. If you don’t do what they ask, the reader may wonder if you will be able to follow directions in their program. Make sure you follow page and word limits exactly—err on the side of shortness, not length. The essay may take two forms:

  • A one-page essay answering a general question
  • Several short answers to more specific questions

Do some research before you start writing. Think about…

  • The field. Why do you want to be a _____? No, really. Think about why you and you particularly want to enter that field. What are the benefits and what are the shortcomings? When did you become interested in the field and why? What path in that career interests you right now? Brainstorm and write these ideas out.
  • The program. Why is this the program you want to be admitted to? What is special about the faculty, the courses offered, the placement record, the facilities you might be using? If you can’t think of anything particular, read the brochures they offer, go to events, or meet with a faculty member or student in the program. A word about honesty here—you may have a reason for choosing a program that wouldn’t necessarily sway your reader; for example, you want to live near the beach, or the program is the most prestigious and would look better on your resume. You don’t want to be completely straightforward in these cases and appear superficial, but skirting around them or lying can look even worse. Turn these aspects into positives. For example, you may want to go to a program in a particular location because it is a place that you know very well and have ties to, or because there is a need in your field there. Again, doing research on the program may reveal ways to legitimate even your most superficial and selfish reasons for applying.
  • Yourself. What details or anecdotes would help your reader understand you? What makes you special? Is there something about your family, your education, your work/life experience, or your values that has shaped you and brought you to this career field? What motivates or interests you? Do you have special skills, like leadership, management, research, or communication? Why would the members of the program want to choose you over other applicants? Be honest with yourself and write down your ideas. If you are having trouble, ask a friend or relative to make a list of your strengths or unique qualities that you plan to read on your own (and not argue about immediately). Ask them to give you examples to back up their impressions (For example, if they say you are “caring,” ask them to describe an incident they remember in which they perceived you as caring).

Now, write a draft

This is a hard essay to write. It’s probably much more personal than any of the papers you have written for class because it’s about you, not World War II or planaria. You may want to start by just getting something—anything—on paper. Try freewriting. Think about the questions we asked above and the prompt for the essay, and then write for 15 or 30 minutes without stopping. What do you want your audience to know after reading your essay? What do you want them to feel? Don’t worry about grammar, punctuation, organization, or anything else. Just get out the ideas you have. For help getting started, see our handout on brainstorming .

Now, look at what you’ve written. Find the most relevant, memorable, concrete statements and focus in on them. Eliminate any generalizations or platitudes (“I’m a people person”, “Doctors save lives”, or “Mr. Calleson’s classes changed my life”), or anything that could be cut and pasted into anyone else’s application. Find what is specific to you about the ideas that generated those platitudes and express them more directly. Eliminate irrelevant issues (“I was a track star in high school, so I think I’ll make a good veterinarian.”) or issues that might be controversial for your reader (“My faith is the one true faith, and only nurses with that faith are worthwhile,” or “Lawyers who only care about money are evil.”).

Often, writers start out with generalizations as a way to get to the really meaningful statements, and that’s OK. Just make sure that you replace the generalizations with examples as you revise. A hint: you may find yourself writing a good, specific sentence right after a general, meaningless one. If you spot that, try to use the second sentence and delete the first.

Applications that have several short-answer essays require even more detail. Get straight to the point in every case, and address what they’ve asked you to address.

Now that you’ve generated some ideas, get a little bit pickier. It’s time to remember one of the most significant aspects of the application essay: your audience. Your readers may have thousands of essays to read, many or most of which will come from qualified applicants. This essay may be your best opportunity to communicate with the decision makers in the application process, and you don’t want to bore them, offend them, or make them feel you are wasting their time.

With this in mind:

  • Do assure your audience that you understand and look forward to the challenges of the program and the field, not just the benefits.
  • Do assure your audience that you understand exactly the nature of the work in the field and that you are prepared for it, psychologically and morally as well as educationally.
  • Do assure your audience that you care about them and their time by writing a clear, organized, and concise essay.
  • Do address any information about yourself and your application that needs to be explained (for example, weak grades or unusual coursework for your program). Include that information in your essay, and be straightforward about it. Your audience will be more impressed with your having learned from setbacks or having a unique approach than your failure to address those issues.
  • Don’t waste space with information you have provided in the rest of the application. Every sentence should be effective and directly related to the rest of the essay. Don’t ramble or use fifteen words to express something you could say in eight.
  • Don’t overstate your case for what you want to do, being so specific about your future goals that you come off as presumptuous or naïve (“I want to become a dentist so that I can train in wisdom tooth extraction, because I intend to focus my life’s work on taking 13 rather than 15 minutes per tooth.”). Your goals may change–show that such a change won’t devastate you.
  • And, one more time, don’t write in cliches and platitudes. Every doctor wants to help save lives, every lawyer wants to work for justice—your reader has read these general cliches a million times.

Imagine the worst-case scenario (which may never come true—we’re talking hypothetically): the person who reads your essay has been in the field for decades. She is on the application committee because she has to be, and she’s read 48 essays so far that morning. You are number 49, and your reader is tired, bored, and thinking about lunch. How are you going to catch and keep her attention?

Assure your audience that you are capable academically, willing to stick to the program’s demands, and interesting to have around. For more tips, see our handout on audience .

Voice and style

The voice you use and the style in which you write can intrigue your audience. The voice you use in your essay should be yours. Remember when your high school English teacher said “never say ‘I’”? Here’s your chance to use all those “I”s you’ve been saving up. The narrative should reflect your perspective, experiences, thoughts, and emotions. Focusing on events or ideas may give your audience an indirect idea of how these things became important in forming your outlook, but many others have had equally compelling experiences. By simply talking about those events in your own voice, you put the emphasis on you rather than the event or idea. Look at this anecdote:

During the night shift at Wirth Memorial Hospital, a man walked into the Emergency Room wearing a monkey costume and holding his head. He seemed confused and was moaning in pain. One of the nurses ascertained that he had been swinging from tree branches in a local park and had hit his head when he fell out of a tree. This tragic tale signified the moment at which I realized psychiatry was the only career path I could take.

An interesting tale, yes, but what does it tell you about the narrator? The following example takes the same anecdote and recasts it to make the narrator more of a presence in the story:

I was working in the Emergency Room at Wirth Memorial Hospital one night when a man walked in wearing a monkey costume and holding his head. I could tell he was confused and in pain. After a nurse asked him a few questions, I listened in surprise as he explained that he had been a monkey all of his life and knew that it was time to live with his brothers in the trees. Like many other patients I would see that year, this man suffered from an illness that only a combination of psychological and medical care would effectively treat. I realized then that I wanted to be able to help people by using that particular combination of skills only a psychiatrist develops.

The voice you use should be approachable as well as intelligent. This essay is not the place to stun your reader with ten prepositional phrases (“the goal of my study of the field of law in the winter of my discontent can best be understood by the gathering of more information about my youth”) and thirty nouns (“the research and study of the motivation behind my insights into the field of dentistry contains many pitfalls and disappointments but even more joy and enlightenment”) per sentence. (Note: If you are having trouble forming clear sentences without all the prepositions and nouns, take a look at our handout on style .)

You may want to create an impression of expertise in the field by using specialized or technical language. But beware of this unless you really know what you are doing—a mistake will look twice as ignorant as not knowing the terms in the first place. Your audience may be smart, but you don’t want to make them turn to a dictionary or fall asleep between the first word and the period of your first sentence. Keep in mind that this is a personal statement. Would you think you were learning a lot about a person whose personal statement sounded like a journal article? Would you want to spend hours in a lab or on a committee with someone who shuns plain language?

Of course, you don’t want to be chatty to the point of making them think you only speak slang, either. Your audience may not know what “I kicked that lame-o to the curb for dissing my research project” means. Keep it casual enough to be easy to follow, but formal enough to be respectful of the audience’s intelligence.

Just use an honest voice and represent yourself as naturally as possible. It may help to think of the essay as a sort of face-to-face interview, only the interviewer isn’t actually present.

Too much style

A well-written, dramatic essay is much more memorable than one that fails to make an emotional impact on the reader. Good anecdotes and personal insights can really attract an audience’s attention. BUT be careful not to let your drama turn into melodrama. You want your reader to see your choices motivated by passion and drive, not hyperbole and a lack of reality. Don’t invent drama where there isn’t any, and don’t let the drama take over. Getting someone else to read your drafts can help you figure out when you’ve gone too far.

Taking risks

Many guides to writing application essays encourage you to take a risk, either by saying something off-beat or daring or by using a unique writing style. When done well, this strategy can work—your goal is to stand out from the rest of the applicants and taking a risk with your essay will help you do that. An essay that impresses your reader with your ability to think and express yourself in original ways and shows you really care about what you are saying is better than one that shows hesitancy, lack of imagination, or lack of interest.

But be warned: this strategy is a risk. If you don’t carefully consider what you are saying and how you are saying it, you may offend your readers or leave them with a bad impression of you as flaky, immature, or careless. Do not alienate your readers.

Some writers take risks by using irony (your suffering at the hands of a barbaric dentist led you to want to become a gentle one), beginning with a personal failure (that eventually leads to the writer’s overcoming it), or showing great imagination (one famous successful example involved a student who answered a prompt about past formative experiences by beginning with a basic answer—”I have volunteered at homeless shelters”—that evolved into a ridiculous one—”I have sealed the hole in the ozone layer with plastic wrap”). One student applying to an art program described the person he did not want to be, contrasting it with the person he thought he was and would develop into if accepted. Another person wrote an essay about her grandmother without directly linking her narrative to the fact that she was applying for medical school. Her essay was risky because it called on the reader to infer things about the student’s character and abilities from the story.

Assess your credentials and your likelihood of getting into the program before you choose to take a risk. If you have little chance of getting in, try something daring. If you are almost certainly guaranteed a spot, you have more flexibility. In any case, make sure that you answer the essay question in some identifiable way.

After you’ve written a draft

Get several people to read it and write their comments down. It is worthwhile to seek out someone in the field, perhaps a professor who has read such essays before. Give it to a friend, your mom, or a neighbor. The key is to get more than one point of view, and then compare these with your own. Remember, you are the one best equipped to judge how accurately you are representing yourself. For tips on putting this advice to good use, see our handout on getting feedback .

After you’ve received feedback, revise the essay. Put it away. Get it out and revise it again (you can see why we said to start right away—this process may take time). Get someone to read it again. Revise it again.

When you think it is totally finished, you are ready to proofread and format the essay. Check every sentence and punctuation mark. You cannot afford a careless error in this essay. (If you are not comfortable with your proofreading skills, check out our handout on editing and proofreading ).

If you find that your essay is too long, do not reformat it extensively to make it fit. Making readers deal with a nine-point font and quarter-inch margins will only irritate them. Figure out what material you can cut and cut it. For strategies for meeting word limits, see our handout on writing concisely .

Finally, proofread it again. We’re not kidding.

Other resources

Don’t be afraid to talk to professors or professionals in the field. Many of them would be flattered that you asked their advice, and they will have useful suggestions that others might not have. Also keep in mind that many colleges and professional programs offer websites addressing the personal statement. You can find them either through the website of the school to which you are applying or by searching under “personal statement” or “application essays” using a search engine.

If your schedule and ours permit, we invite you to come to the Writing Center. Be aware that during busy times in the semester, we limit students to a total of two visits to discuss application essays and personal statements (two visits per student, not per essay); we do this so that students working on papers for courses will have a better chance of being seen. Make an appointment or submit your essay to our online writing center (note that we cannot guarantee that an online tutor will help you in time).

For information on other aspects of the application process, you can consult the resources at University Career Services .

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Asher, Donald. 2012. Graduate Admissions Essays: Write Your Way Into the Graduate School of Your Choice , 4th ed. Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

Curry, Boykin, Emily Angel Baer, and Brian Kasbar. 2003. Essays That Worked for College Applications: 50 Essays That Helped Students Get Into the Nation’s Top Colleges . New York: Ballantine Books.

Stelzer, Richard. 2002. How to Write a Winning Personal Statement for Graduate and Professional School , 3rd ed. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Make a Gift

Get the Reddit app

Discord

Join the A2C Discord!

r/ApplyingToCollege is the premier forum for college admissions questions, advice, and discussions, from college essays and scholarships to college list help and application advice, career guidance, and more.

I Reviewed My Admissions Profile from UNC-Chapel Hill

Hello everyone,

I recently was accepted to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a full ride scholarship! Consequently, I chose to enroll this year as a first-year freshman.

A few days ago, I got the opportunity to dive into the specifics of my admissions profile. I am aware that others have did the same and posted their experiences as well. However, I believe that every experience is worth sharing, thus I am here to share mine!

Disclaimer: I was unable to take any pictures.

On my admissions file, there was a ranking system for four different categories: Program, Performance, Extracurriculars, and Personal Qualities.

PROGRAM (average ranking: 7): This category essentially focused on the types of classes that appeared on my transcript (AP, Honors, IB, etc). With this category, admission officers use this information to determine if you are prepared for the academic rigor evident at UNC-CH. As the admission officer explained it to me, more advanced courses will allow one to increase their ranking in this individual category. As for the specific ranking system, AOs assign a number from 1 to 10. I received a 10; I had a total of 8 AP Courses, 19 Credit Hours of Dual Enrollment, and 18 Honors Courses.

PERFORMANCE (average ranking: 7): The performance category evaluated your grades in the respective classes that appeared on your transcript. This category seems heavily formula based; since this category is also on a scale of 1 to 10, a 10 is given to an applicant with all A’s. Although one B would bring your ranking down to a 9, the AO explained that with each ranking level, there is some room for “leeway”. In other words, the grade thresholds for each ranking level is appropriately expansive to permit a high rank (9, 8, 7, 6) even if an applicant has a few B’s. I received a 10 on this category because I had all A’s.

(NOTE: For both the Performance and Program categories, classes and grades from grade 9 to grade 11 are taken into consideration. With both categories, grade 12 classes and grades are not considered (this is not saying that senior year classwork does not influence the admission process. Don’t slack off senior year!))

EXTRACURRICULARS (average ranking: 5): This category evaluates your extracurricular involvement. The ranking is influenced by commitment, types of extracurriculars, and the quality of your specific involvement in your activities. Applicants receive either a 1, 3, 5, 7, or 10 as their category ranking. I received a 7 for this category: I had two major leadership activities that influenced my entire district, VP of National Honor Society, and consistently worked 30+ hours a week since grade 9.

PERSONAL QUALITIES (average ranking: 5): The AO leading my admissions profile breakdown explained how this category took the most effort to score. In other words, since AOs spend much of their time evaluating an applicant’s personal qualities, it can be concluded that a prospective applicant should also put much of their time into showcasing their personal attributes. Personal qualities are taken from your main Common App essay and the UNC-CH supplemental questions. Applicants receive a 1, 3, 5, or 7 for this category. I received a 7 (I was very shocked). In order to prevent exposure, I will not go into detail about what I wrote for my essay or supplemental questions. However, one piece of advice that helped me through the writing process was to pretend as if you were having a conversation with someone. You don’t want your responses to mimic a thesaurus. They do not need to be “typical” responses. A human is reading your responses, so ensure that you properly capture your best attributes in a way that affects a human, not a computer.

On some of the other posts about this topic, I have seen that two admissions officers typically read your profile. In my case, only one AO read mine (I was told that for exclusively this year, one admission officer read your profile). His comments acknowledged my perfect grades, leadership capabilities, willingness to overcome adversity, and excerpts taken from my letters of recommendation.

Thanks for taking the time to read this! I decided to make this post to show others that admissions officers truly do look at everything. On this subreddit, it is apparent that others may not believe this to be true. Even if you have plans to attend a school other than UNC-CH, please use this post as a reminder that AO’s know that you are more than your grades and test scores. As a result, for the future high school class of 2023, show these admissions officers what they will miss if they do not accept you! Give it all you got! I believe in each and every one of you!

First-Year Application

We’re grateful for your interest in joining our community.

When you apply, we’ll consider everything we learn about you from reading your application. You’re a unique individual, and we want to treat you as you deserve to be treated — with care, appreciation, and respect.

I’m an International Student

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

Pick Your Deadline

Early action (non-binding).

Application Deadline – October 15 Decision Available – January 31

Regular Decision

Application Deadline – January 15 Decision Available – March 31

enrollment confirmation deadline

For Early Action and Regular Decision – May 1

Complete your Application

Apply online through the Common Application. Then, be sure to have your supporting materials sent to us, which will help us gain a fuller understanding of you as a student and the contributions that you make in the classroom.

What’s on the Common Application?

  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Essay and Two Short Answers
  • Your College and University Courses
  • Global Opportunities
  • Honors Carolina and Special Opportunities
  • Application Fee or Fee Waiver

What supporting materials are required?

  • Letter of Recommendation
  • Official Transcript and School Report
  • SAT or ACT Scores (optional for 2025 admission)

When you complete your Common Application, provide us with your personal email address to make sure our messages go straight to you.

  • Global Opportunities This section of your application is optional. In addition to considering applicants for fall enrollment, we are looking for students who want to go abroad before enrolling at Carolina through either the Global Gap Year Fellowship or Carolina Global Launch.  If you’d like to be considered for either, indicate your interest and submit two additional short answer responses that share your interest in global experiences.
  • Honors Carolina and Special Opportunities This section of your application is optional. You can express interest in a range of special opportunities including Honors Carolina,  assured enrollment in professional or dual-degree programs, or specific scholarships.
  • Application Fee or Fee Waiver The non-refundable application fee is $85, and if you can’t pay the fee right now, please talk with your school counselor about asking us to waive it. The bottom line: whether you apply with a fee or a waiver, we’ll be grateful to receive your application, and we’ll consider you with care, appreciation, and respect.
  • Official Transcript and School Report Ask your school to send us your official transcript by secure electronic delivery as well as an official school report.
  • For students applying for the 2024-2025 academic year , students are not required to submit a test score.
  • For students applying for the 2025-2026 academic year , students with a weighted GPA of 2.8 or above (on a 4.0 scale) are not required to submit a test score. Students with a weighted GPA below 2.8 (on a 4.0 scale) are required to submit either an ACT or SAT score.
  • For students applying for the 2026-2027 academic year and beyond , students with a weighted GPA of 2.8 or above (on a 4.0 scale) are not required to submit a test score. Students with a weighted GPA below 2.8 (on a 4.0 scale) are required to submit either an ACT score of 17 or higher or an SAT score of 930 or higher.
  • For the full UNC System policy, please visit www.northcarolina.edu/students/admission/ .
  • Most successful applicants (domestic and international) to Carolina have very strong grades in their core academic coursework and have well above a B+ average in their courses. If your school does not provide a weighted GPA on a 4.0 scale, but you have above a B+ average in your courses (weighted if applicable), you will not be required to submit an ACT or SAT. If you are an international student in a Cambridge-based or similar educational system, we consider your grades made in A-level or external exams for the purposes of this UNC System GPA-based testing requirement.

Silhouettes of students walking past campus building

Apply for Aid

Submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and CSS Profile. Learn how to submit both on our Financial Aid website.

Keep in Mind

  • If you’re a North Carolina resident, you’ll need verify your residency with Residency Determination Services.
  • Check your email regularly. If we need materials or more information as we’re reviewing your application, your email is where you’ll hear from us.
  • If you need to add information to your application after you’ve submitted it, you’ll be able to send it to us using MyCarolina. If a school official or recommender has additional information, please ask them to email us at [email protected] and include your full name and date of birth.
  • If you believe your academic progress has been affected by disability-related issues, we encourage you to share this information with us. Learn more about submitting disability-related documentation.
  • We require all applicants (including students offered admission) to disclose any new school-based disciplinary incidents or criminal charges that occur after the application was submitted within ten days of the occurrence. The student’s written explanation as well as any required corroborating documentation (from a school official or legal representative) can be shared in MyCarolina.

Helpful Deadlines

DeadlineEarly ActionRegular Decision
Application and Fee or WaiverOctober 15January 15
ResidencyOctober 15January 15
Supporting Materials and Test ScoresDecember 1February 15
Financial AidMarch 1March 1
Admissions Decisions AvailableJanuary 31March 31
Enrollment Confirmation if AdmittedMay 15May 15

UNC Health Professions Advising Logo

  • Application Services
  • Letters of Recommendation
  • Personal Statement
  • Preparing to Interview

Writing a Personal Statement

Most health-related professional schools require applicants to submit one personal essay, also called your personal statement. This essay is your chance to introduce yourself to admissions committees and discuss what will make you a unique and engaging part of your chosen health profession.

The Basics of Writing a Personal Statement

  • You should be clear and concise in your writing. Admissions committees are looking for a coherent essay with no spelling or grammatical errors.
  • The length of your essay may vary depending on each school’s requirements. If you are submitting your applications through AMCAS, there is a 5,300 character limit, approximately 500 words.
  • Use active voice instead of passive voice, for example, say “I learned” rather than “I was taught”.
  • Write an essay that is personal and describes who you are as a person. Although you might want to discuss an engaging interaction or experience with another person, make sure your essay is primarily about you.
  • Ask others to read over your essay and provide feedback.
  • Expect to make several revisions of your essay.
  • Avoid using slang words and colloquialisms.

We cannot stress this enough. A great way to proofread your own writing is to read it backwards: start reading at the very last word of your essay and read until you reach the beginning.

Although your essay should be structured and coherent, for example, correct grammar and spelling, it doesn’t have to be as formal as other academic writing. If writing isn’t your strongest skill, remember that you don’t have to be a great creative writer to write a great personal statement; and remember that your application doesn’t rest solely on your writing abilities. Your personal statement is just one piece of your application. Think of it as a supporting document that will help admissions committees see your true strength and potential.

If you would like help writing your personal essay, you can schedule an appointment with The Writing Center .

Additional Resources from The Writing Center:

Online Writing Resources

Tips for Writers of Application Essays, Personal Statements, Grants, and Cover Letters

Handout on Application Essays

PrepScholar

Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 3 tips for writing stellar unc chapel hill supplement essays.

author image

College Essays

unc-1

If you're applying for admission to UNC Chapel Hill , you'll have to write a total of three essays as part of your application. Your UNC Chapel Hill supplemental essays are a great way to tell the admissions committee more about yourself while also showing your interest in UNC and your dedication to your education.

In this article, we'll break down what the UNC essay prompts are, what you should talk about in each, and offer tips for writing great UNC supplemental essays.

What Are the UNC Essay Prompts?

UNC Chapel Hill uses the Common Application for its admissions process. As a first-year applicant, you'll be required to write a total of three essays: one Common Application essay and two UNC-specific essays.

The UNC supplemental essays are two 200-250 word essays that respond to UNC-specific questions. There are a total of four UNC supplemental essays to choose from; you get to pick whichever two you would like to answer.

Here are the four UNC essay prompts:

  • Describe an aspect of your identity and how this has shaped your life experiences or impacted your daily interactions with others?
  • Describe a peer who is making a difference in your school or community. What actions has that peer taken? How has their work made a difference in your life?
  • If you could change one thing to better your community, what would it be? Please explain.
  • Former UNC-Chapel Hill employee, community service member, and civil rights activist Esphur Foster once said, “We are nothing without our history.” Her words are memorialized on the Northside Neighborhood Freedom Fighters monument. How does history shape who you are?

In the next section, we'll talk about how to answer each of the UNC supplemental essays.

UNC Supplemental Essays, Analyzed

Each of the four UNC essay prompts asks you to share about something in your life that the admissions committee wouldn't know from reading the rest of your application. The key to writing great UNC supplemental essays is to be personal and specific.

Let's take a look at what the admissions committee wants to know in each prompt.

Describe an aspect of your identity and how this has shaped your life experiences or impacted your daily interactions with others? (200-250 words)

To answer this prompt, you'll have to do three things. First, you need to identify a peer who's active in your community and making a difference. You can interpret the word “peer” loosely here if you want to. It could be someone your age or someone from your school, or just another person in your social group you’ve seen making a difference. 

No matter who you choose, you'll have to briefly explain who they are and what they're doing. This will help your readers contextualize why this person is important! And, as usual, it's even better if you can do this in a story format. Maybe you volunteered with someone from your dance class who also happens to be one of the most outspoken advocates for climate change in your city. Telling a story about your personal experience with them would take your essay to another level.

Finally, you need to be very specific about how the community builder you've chosen has impacted your life. While it's great if you have a close relationship with this person, you don't have to in order to write a great essay! Maybe your school’s student body president organized a group that cleans litter out of neighborhoods. While you don't know her personally, her group's hard work makes your life cleaner, and it helps people have more pride in their city.

Keep in mind that even though you're talking about another person, this essay should still showcase something about you. Pick a person who inspires you or shares your values, and explain why you think their work matters. Don't miss the chance to help admissions counselors get to know you better!

people-2557396_640

Describe an aspect of your identity (for example, your religion, culture, race, sexual or gender identity, affinity group, etc.). How has this aspect of your identity shaped your life experiences thus far? (200-250 words)

To answer this prompt, you're going to have to do a little introspection. The admissions counselors want you to write about one aspect of who you are , then explain how it has impacted your values, ideas, and experiences.

The good news (and maybe bad news?) is that there are tons of facets to your personality. The prompt gives you a few big areas you can focus on, but the trick is going to be to pick an element of your identity that you can tell a story about.

Let's say you identify as trans. That's probably a huge part of who you are! To write this essay, start by telling a story about how your trans identity has shaped you. Maybe you were elected homecoming queen after you transitioned, and it showed you how accepting yourself was the first step in being accepted by others. Whatever the case may be, using a story will be key to connecting with your audience.

And of course, don't forget to answer the second part of the prompt about how this part of your identity has shaped you as a person. Make sure you're making the connection for your reader! Don't just say you're the child of Palestinian immigrants. Explain how that has solidified your commitment to humanitarianism and economic equality.

If you could change one thing to better your community, what would it be? Please explain. (200-250 words)

While this prompt may seem serious, it doesn't have to be. You don't need to do in-depth research into your neighborhood and your city's politics, but you do need to pick a change that has personal meaning for you.

For instance, maybe you and your neighbors don't know each other well and you'd like to have a greater feeling of community with the people you live nearby. That reason has nothing to do with legislation, but would still make a big impact!

The key here is to identify the thing you would change, then explain why you would make that change. Going back to our example about neighborhood community, maybe the "why" is because it would help you support one another. Your neighbors could help each other with yard work, child care, and maybe even after school tutoring! By bringing people together, not only do you take some of the burden off of individuals, but it would form the bonds that help make neighborhoods happy, healthy, and safe places to live.

The last crucial detail you need to discuss in your response is how you would contribute to this change. Don't be afraid of dreaming big! You can easily integrate your explanation of how you’d contribute into your description of the change that you want to see. 

To the extent that you can, give concrete details about what you’d do to support this change . As much as this prompt is asking about your community, it’s even more interested in finding out how you perceive your role in your community--and whether you take that responsibility seriously. 

Former UNC-Chapel Hill employee, community service member, and civil rights activist Esphur Foster once said, “We are nothing without our history.” Her words are memorialized on the Northside Neighborhood Freedom Fighters monument. How does history shape who you are? (200-250 words)

This prompt is asking you to show your awareness of your place in the world beyond the things that are local to you, like your family, school, and hometown. Understanding how history has shaped who you are helps you be an ethical citizen and member of your communities--qualities that UNC is looking for in its applicants!

But “history” seems a little broad, right? The good news about that is that you can bring your own interpretation of the term “history” to your response here. You could look reflect on aspects of U.S. history, world history, or the history of a set of religious beliefs. You could write about something more personal, like your family history, or something pertaining to your academic interests, like the history of women in computer science!

The key here is to make sure you explain how a specific piece of history has shaped who you are --your identity and your views of the world. To do this effectively, you won’t be able to summarize the entire history of the United States or the legacies of second-wave feminism. You’ll have to incorporate one or two historical details into your story and dive deep into how they have shaped who you are. Because as the prompt says, we are nothing without our history!

body-tips-and-tricks

3 Tips For Mastering Your UNC Essays

Hoping to write two amazing UNC supplemental essays? Follow these key tips to do so!

#1: Use Your Own Voice

The point of a college essay is for the admissions committee to have the chance to get to know you beyond what's featured in other parts of your application. Your admissions essays are your chance to become more than just a collection of statistics—to really come alive for your application readers.

Make sure that the person you're presenting in your college essays is yourself. Don't just write what you think the committee wants to hear or try to act like someone you're not—it will be really easy for the committee to tell you're lying.

If you lie or exaggerate, your essay will come across as insincere, which will at best diminish its effectiveness and at worst make the admissions committee think twice on accepting you. Stick to telling real stories about the person you really are, not who you think UNC wants you to be.

#2: Avoid Cliches and Overused Phrases

When writing your UNC essays, don't use cliches or overused quotes or phrases. The college admissions committee has probably seen numerous essays that state, "Be the change you want to see in the world." You can write something more original than that!

Each of the UNC essays asks you something specific about your experience or background. Your essay should be 100% you—you don't want the admissions committee to think, "Anyone could have written this essay."

correcting-1870721_640

#3: Check Your Work

Your UNC essays should be the strongest example of your work possible. Before you turn in your UNC Chapel Hill application, edit and proofread your essays.

Run your essays through a spelling and grammar check before you submit and ask someone else to read your essays. You can seek a second opinion on your work from a parent, teacher, or friend. Ask them whether your work represents you as a student and person. Have them check and make sure you haven't missed any small writing errors. Having a second opinion will help your work be the best it possibly can be.

Final Thoughts

Your UNC supplemental essays are your chance to show the admissions committee what makes you special and different from the other tens of thousands of students applying for admission at UNC.

In your essays, make sure you are authentic, well-spoken, and polished so you give the admissions committee the best possible understanding of who you are as a person.

What's Next?

Need more help with your scholarship search? Read our expert guide on how to find college scholarships .

Need help writing your Common App essay? Our tips will show you how to write a Common App essay guaranteed to make you stand out from other applicants!

How does UNC's selectivity compare with those of other top colleges? Get the answer in our guide to the most selective schools in the nation !

Want to write the perfect college application essay?   We can help.   Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will help you craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay to proudly submit to colleges.   Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now:

Hayley Milliman is a former teacher turned writer who blogs about education, history, and technology. When she was a teacher, Hayley's students regularly scored in the 99th percentile thanks to her passion for making topics digestible and accessible. In addition to her work for PrepScholar, Hayley is the author of Museum Hack's Guide to History's Fiercest Females.

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!

Improve With Our Famous Guides

  • For All Students

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 160+ SAT Points

How to Get a Perfect 1600, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 800 on Each SAT Section:

Score 800 on SAT Math

Score 800 on SAT Reading

Score 800 on SAT Writing

Series: How to Get to 600 on Each SAT Section:

Score 600 on SAT Math

Score 600 on SAT Reading

Score 600 on SAT Writing

Free Complete Official SAT Practice Tests

What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For?

15 Strategies to Improve Your SAT Essay

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 4+ ACT Points

How to Get a Perfect 36 ACT, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 36 on Each ACT Section:

36 on ACT English

36 on ACT Math

36 on ACT Reading

36 on ACT Science

Series: How to Get to 24 on Each ACT Section:

24 on ACT English

24 on ACT Math

24 on ACT Reading

24 on ACT Science

What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

ACT Vocabulary You Must Know

ACT Writing: 15 Tips to Raise Your Essay Score

How to Get Into Harvard and the Ivy League

How to Get a Perfect 4.0 GPA

How to Write an Amazing College Essay

What Exactly Are Colleges Looking For?

Is the ACT easier than the SAT? A Comprehensive Guide

Should you retake your SAT or ACT?

When should you take the SAT or ACT?

Stay Informed

Get the latest articles and test prep tips!

Follow us on Facebook (icon)

Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

Check out our top-rated graduate blogs here:

GRE Online Prep Blog

GMAT Online Prep Blog

TOEFL Online Prep Blog

Holly R. "I am absolutely overjoyed and cannot thank you enough for helping me!”

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program details.

Minimum Credit Hours 46

Application Cycle Fall Consultation with the Director of Graduate Admissions will be required in order to be considered for admission in any semester other than Fall.

Application Priority Deadline

November 14th, 2023

Application Deadline December 12, 2023

Expected Duration 4-5 Years

Learning Environment Residential

Admissions Information

Who Should Apply Applicants with an undergraduate degree interested in engaging in rigorous training in research methodology with substantive knowledge to provide the academic foundation and research experience to become creative and independent researchers. A Master’s degree or experience in health policy or health services research is preferred but not required.

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) program looks for students with an outstanding academic record, innovative thinking, and evidence of a focus in research interests on health services research and health policy.

Prior Degree Required Master’s degree or relevant experience preferred but not required.

Required Prerequisites None.

Undergraduate G.P.A. An average grade of B (cumulative GPA 3.0) or better is required. Incoming students had a mean undergraduate GPA of 3.4.

Letters of Recommendation Required 3 (academic and/or professional; academic preferred)

Interviews Department will contact selected applicants for interviews.

Visit Opportunities Learn about opportunities to connect with faculty, staff, and current students virtually and in person.

How To Apply

I. Complete UNC Graduate School application The Graduate School Application is a common application system for UNC Chapel Hill programs.

More Information

1. Application Fee

The UNC Graduate School application fee is $95. Information on UNC Graduate School Fee Waiver Requests

2. Faculty Interest(s)/mentor(s)

You are asked to list faculty with whom you’d like to work; this information can be helpful to the admissions committee.

3. Applicant information,  including North Carolina residency information.

4. Area(s) of interest

Please select your primary and secondary concentration areas via the Areas of Interest/Specialization drop-down box within your application. Please note that this selection is essential in facilitating a match with an advisor, so careful consideration of a concentration is strongly encouraged. Referring to the research approach and required courses in each concentration is strongly encouraged before making a selection. Selecting more than two concentration areas is not required or encouraged.

5. Educational history

Please upload a copy of your most recent transcript(s), including your current term grades, if applicable. (If grades are not yet available, send them to the UNC Gillings program contact as soon as they become available.) Be sure the transcript reflects the name of the institution and any degrees you received.

We advise that you order two copies of your transcript(s) to be sent to you. If you are admitted and choose to enroll, UNC will require official transcript(s) showing degree(s) awarded.

6. Community standards

You will be asked about honor code, crime, academic sanction, military discharge, etc.

7. Upload your personal statement.

Upload a brief essay (up to 4 pages in length) that addresses the issues listed below. Use this statement to provide the Admissions Committee with detailed information relevant to your application that is not otherwise available.

  • Why do you wish to study health policy and/or health services research?
  • Please describe any previous research experience you have had.
  • Which of our concentration areas is the closest match for your research approach and interests? Describe how the selected concentration focus will fit into your projected career plans. (Please see Plans for Graduate Study Page requirements below)
  • Discuss the way in which your past education, research and/or work experience(s) will contribute to your proposed studies at UNC.
  • Explain how your academic background, strengths, and lived experiences might: (1) contribute to health services/ health policy research and/ or (2) distinguish you from other applicants. Indicate faculty members in the Department who most closely match your interests. Be specific about the areas of overlap in interest.

8. Upload your resume or CV.

9. Enter names of recommenders. UNC will then send them an email with instructions for submitting a letter on your behalf.

3 Letters of Recommendations are required. We encourage references from professors or teachers (or teaching assistants) or work/research supervisors who have worked directly and closely with you and who can speak about you with specificity.

10. Report test scores, if applicable.

GRE scores are neither required nor typically recommended for applicants.

International applicants must submit official TOEFL or IELTS standardized test scores. Code 5816 routes to UNC. TOEFL/IELTS scores must be no more than two years old.

11. Document submission (check legibility of uploads)

Applicants should preview all documents uploaded into the application system to ensure that all documents are legible for committee review.

12. Track your progress.

You will be able to track status through the Graduate School application. Once a decision is made, you will receive an email instructing login to the Graduate School application portal to see the decision letter.

II. Application Review Process

1. Department reviews application and recommends a decision.

Time-to-decision varies. Departments make recommendations to the UNC Graduate School for admitting and denying applicants. Final decisions are rendered by the UNC Graduate School.

2. UNC Graduate School reviews department recommendation and renders a final decision:

The UNC Graduate School reviews all admissions recommendations made by programs. Once final decisions have been made, the UNC Graduate School will send the applicant an email instructing them to login to their application portal to see the decision letter.

III. Costs and Funding

When estimating costs, please visit the UNC Cashier’s Office and use the Graduate and Professional Program Tuition and Fees link. Please note that the tuition and fees of graduate programs at Gillings vary from other graduate programs at UNC.

Gillings departments and concentrations consider both domestic and international applicants for funding. Please see below for helpful tips and resources:

1. Applicants will be reviewed for eligibility for UNC Graduate School scholarships and fellowships. Departments and concentrations will decide which applicants to nominate. No additional application is required.

2. Please refer to our School’s Costs and Funding page and/or UNC-Chapel Hill’s Office of Scholarships and Student Aid (OSSA) website.

3. Apply for FEDERAL financial aid by March 1 (please verify this date via FAFSA ). If you have been admitted and completed the FAFSA form by their deadline, the UNC Office of Scholarship and Student Aid will create a financial aid package for you.

4. Funding offers through the department, such as research assistantships, are possible but not guaranteed.

5. Students positions at Gillings are posted here . The UNC Graduate School also provides resources for funding, including a listserv for incoming and current students, here .

During and After The Program

For more information on our curriculum and graduate school/career outcomes, please see our Student Handbook .

Gillings Admissions [email protected]

Kim Sieler Academic Coordinator [email protected]

Justin Trogdon Director of Graduate Admissions [email protected]

CAHME serves the public interest by advancing the quality of healthcare management education.

The Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) is a global network of colleges, universities, faculty, individuals and organizations dedicated to the improvement of health and healthcare delivery through excellence in healthcare management and policy education.

The UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center is a cancer research and treatment center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Serving patients at the N.C. Basnight Cancer Hospital, UNC Lineberger is the only public comprehensive cancer center in the state of North Carolina.

New HIV risk assessment tool could help focus prevention resources for women in Africa

Information for:.

  • Law Library

JD and Dual Degree Applicants

How should i prepare.

No specific curriculum, major or courses are required for admission to Carolina Law. A broad educational background is encouraged. To apply, you must:

  • Have a bachelor’s degree from a fully accredited college or university by the date of anticipated enrollment.
  • Have taken the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) administered by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) within the last five years.
  • Register with the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) . Registration includes law school report preparation, letter of recommendation and transcript processing, and access to applications for all law schools accredited by the American Bar Association.

Application Materials

Application materials are accepted through the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) beginning October 1. All materials must be received by the school by May 1.

Your application will be considered once our Office of Admissions has received the following:

  • Application form . Complete the entire LSAC application online. Submitting the application electronically means you have agreed to all the agreements in the directions and on the last page of the application. Submitting it electronically serves as the signature on the honor system page.
  • Application fee. Your nonrefundable application fee of $75 must be submitted by credit card through LSAC.
  • Scores from every Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) taken before or after submission of the application and reported through the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) at the LSAC. We accept test scores up to five years old. If you have multiple test scores, we base our admissions decision on the highest score. We accept the February LSAT, but we encourage you to take one of the earlier exams so that your application is completed in a timely fashion. If you have a pending LSAT test date or unreported score, your file will be held as incomplete and will be ineligible for review.
  • Transcripts of grades from all colleges, universities, graduate and professional schools attended.
  • Two (2) letters of recommendation. A third letter of recommendation is optional. Recommendation writers should use your full name.
  • Personal statement. This is your opportunity to share why you want to join the legal profession, and why you are interested in Carolina Law. Please refer to the application for specific information regarding the personal statement requirement and the topics to be addressed.The personal statement should be double-spaced and in no less than 10-point type. The maximum number of pages for answering each required topic is three (3) pages and two (2) pages for the optional topic. Each topic should be addressed in its own word document.

The legal profession plays a vital role in the pursuit of justice and in sustaining the institutions of society, including governments, private corporations and organizations, nonprofit organizations, families, and individuals. Please write a statement discussing why you want to become a member of the legal profession and why you think you are prepared for the ethical, professional, and time demands of the profession. 

What is your reason for choosing the University of North Carolina School of Law? How does the institution meet your educational and/or your professional goals? Please include how your academic background, personal qualities, and life experiences inform your pursuit of a legal education at Carolina Law and how you will contribute to the breadth of perspectives in the law classroom and broader law school community. 

The School of Law is committed to a full evaluation of your credentials. Please set forth any circumstances you believe may have negatively affected your cumulative undergraduate grade-point average, your performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and/or your participation in service or extracurricular activities. 

  • Resume. The resume may be up to three pages.
  • Supplemental application. Once all required application and CAS report materials are processed, you will receive an email inviting you to complete your supplemental application. Your residency for tuition purposes determination is based upon responses gathered in your supplemental application. Once your supplemental application is processed, your law school application is complete and eligible for review.
  • LSAC Evaluation Service (optional). We review up to two evaluations if you have them, however, we do not accept them in lieu of the letters of recommendation.

Dual Degree Applicants

Students interested in combining a second degree with their J.D. must complete and submit separate applications to both UNC School of Law and the respective graduate program granting the second degree. The application process and acceptance decisions are separate for each school and admission to one program does not guarantee admission to the other.

  • [email protected]
  • (650) 338-8226

Cupertino, CA

AdmissionSight Logo

  • Our Philosophy
  • Our Results
  • News, Media, and Press
  • Common Application
  • College Application Essay Editing
  • Extracurricular Planning
  • Academic Guidance
  • Summer Programs
  • Interview Preparation

Middle School

  • Pre-High School Consultation
  • Boarding School Admissions

College Admissions

  • Academic and Extracurricular Profile Evaluation
  • Senior Editor College Application Program
  • Summer Program Applications
  • Private Consulting Program
  • Transfer Admissions
  • UC Transfer Admissions
  • Ivy League Transfer Admissions

Graduate Admissions

  • Graduate School Admissions
  • MBA Admissions

Private Tutoring

  • SAT/ACT Tutoring
  • AP Exam Tutoring
  • Olympiad Training

Research Programs

  • Science Research Program
  • Humanities Competitions
  • Passion Project Program
  • Ad Hoc Consulting
  • Athletic Recruitment
  • National Universities Rankings
  • Liberal Arts Colleges Rankings
  • Public Schools Rankings

Acceptance Rates

  • University Acceptance Rates
  • Transfer Acceptance Rates
  • Supplemental Essays
  • College Admissions Data
  • Chances Calculator
  • GPA Calculator

National Universities

  • College Acceptance Rates
  • College Overall Acceptance Rates
  • College Regular Acceptance Rates
  • College Early Acceptance Rates
  • Ivy League Acceptance Rates
  • Ivy League Overall Acceptance Rates
  • Ivy League Regular Acceptance Rates
  • Ivy League Early Acceptance Rates

Public Schools

  • Public Schools Acceptance Rates
  • Public Schools Overall Acceptance Rates
  • Public Schools Regular Acceptance Rates
  • Public Schools Early Acceptance Rates

Liberal Arts

  • Liberal Arts Colleges Acceptance Rates
  • Liberal Arts Colleges Overall Acceptance Rates
  • Liberal Arts Colleges Regular Acceptance Rates
  • Liberal Arts Colleges Early Acceptance Rates

AdmissionSight Logo

What Does UNC Chapel Hill Look for in Prospective Students?

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

By Eric Eng

a smiling man with his chin rested on the books while facing the camera

As one of the top universities in North Carolina, UNC Chapel Hill receives thousands of applications each year. But what exactly does the school look for in prospective students? In this article, we will explore what does UNC Chapel Hill look for when evaluating applicants.

The Importance of Academic Achievement in UNC Chapel Hill Admissions

As with most universities, academic achievement is critical in UNC Chapel Hill admissions. The school seeks students who have taken challenging courses and have excelled in their academic pursuits. Specifically, UNC Chapel Hill looks at a student’s grade point average ( GPA ) and academic transcript, considering the courses’ rigor.

In addition to evaluating a student’s academic achievements, UNC Chapel Hill also reviews their standardized test scores. The school considers the SAT and ACT scores, emphasizing the student’s highest section scores across all test dates.

However, academic achievement is not the only factor UNC Chapel Hill considers in its admissions process. The school also values extracurricular activities, community involvement, and leadership experience.

These factors can demonstrate a student’s ability to balance their academic responsibilities with other commitments and showcase their potential to contribute to the UNC Chapel Hill community.

Furthermore, UNC Chapel Hill is committed to creating a diverse and inclusive student body. The school actively seeks out students from various backgrounds, including underrepresented juveniles, first-generation college students, and students from low-income families.

UNC Chapel Hill recognizes that diversity enriches the educational experience for all students and prepares them for success in a global society.

The Role of Extracurricular Activities in UNC Chapel Hill Admissions

While academic achievement is critical, UNC Chapel Hill also emphasizes extracurricular activities. The school seeks well-rounded students who have been involved in various activities outside of the classroom. This can include participation in sports, clubs, organizations, or volunteering.

It’s important to note that UNC Chapel Hill is not necessarily looking for students who have been involved in many extracurricular activities. Instead, the school values quality over quantity, seeking students who have significantly impacted their chosen activities and demonstrated leadership skills.

Four students smiling at the camera while standing next to a college building.

One way that UNC Chapel Hill evaluates the impact of a student’s extracurricular activities is by looking at the level of commitment and dedication demonstrated. For example, a student who has been involved in a club or organization for multiple years and has taken on leadership roles is likely to be viewed more favorably than a student who has only participated for a short time.

Additionally, UNC Chapel Hill values diversity in extracurricular activities. While participation in traditional activities such as sports and clubs is important, the school also looks for students who have pursued unique interests or have been involved in less common activities. This can include starting a business, participating in research projects, or pursuing creative endeavors.

How UNC Chapel Hill Considers Leadership and Community Involvement in Admissions

UNC Chapel Hill highly values leadership and community involvement in the admissions process. The school seeks students who have taken on leadership positions in their extracurricular activities or have demonstrated a commitment to serving their communities.

UNC Chapel Hill evaluates applicants’ leadership and community involvement through their applications, essays, and recommendations . The school looks for evidence of impact and meaningful contributions demonstrating the potential for future leadership and service.

Additionally, UNC Chapel Hill considers the applicant’s involvement in any research or internship opportunities related to their field of study. This demonstrates a dedication to their academic interests and a willingness to take initiative in pursuing their goals.

UNC Chapel Hill’s Approach to Evaluating Standardized Test Scores

UNC Chapel Hill takes a holistic approach to evaluate standardized test scores. While the school does consider a student’s SAT or ACT scores, it does not rely solely on these scores to make admissions decisions.

UNC Chapel Hill considers standardized test scores as just one piece of the application puzzle. The school also evaluates students’ academic achievements, extracurricular activities, essays, and recommendations. Applicants are encouraged to submit scores, but the admissions committee will review all aspects of the application to decide.

Furthermore, UNC Chapel Hill recognizes that standardized test scores may not accurately reflect a student’s potential or abilities. The school understands that test anxiety, personal circumstances, and resource access can impact a student’s performance on these tests.

As a result, the admissions committee takes a nuanced approach to evaluating test scores, considering the context in which they were earned.

The Impact of Essays and Personal Statements

Essays and personal statements are essential to the UNC Chapel Hill admissions process. These pieces allow applicants to showcase their personalities, passions, and unique perspectives.

A woman writing in a table.

UNC Chapel Hill values authenticity and originality in the essays and personal statements submitted by applicants. The school is looking for well-written pieces that provide insight into the applicant’s character and experiences.

Furthermore, essays and personal statements can significantly impact applicants’ chances of being accepted into UNC Chapel Hill. Admissions officers use these pieces to understand better the applicant beyond their academic achievements and extracurricular activities.

A compelling essay or personal statement can set applicants apart from others with similar qualifications and demonstrate their potential to contribute to the UNC Chapel Hill community.

How UNC Chapel Hill Considers Demonstrated Interest in the School

While demonstrated interest in UNC Chapel Hill is not a primary factor in the admissions process, it can be a tiebreaker for applicants on the edge of acceptance or rejection. Demonstrated interest can include visiting campus, attending information sessions, or contacting admissions representatives.

UNC Chapel Hill tracks demonstrated interest through interactions with applicants and their engagement with the school’s resources. While it is not a guarantee of admission, demonstrating a genuine interest in the school can help an applicant stand out.

It is important to note that demonstrated interest is not the only factor UNC Chapel Hill considers in the admissions process. The school also examines an applicant’s academic achievements, extracurricular activities, essays, and letters of recommendation.

However, demonstrating interest in the school can show that an applicant is serious about attending UNC Chapel Hill and can help to strengthen their overall application.

Understanding UNC Chapel Hill’s Holistic Admissions Process

Student writing college or university application.

Overall, UNC Chapel Hill takes a holistic approach to admissions, seeking well-rounded students who have demonstrated academic achievement, leadership, community involvement, and a commitment to learning and growth.

The school evaluates each applicant on an individual basis and takes into account all aspects of the application. While there are no formulas or set criteria for admissions, UNC Chapel Hill seeks students who have the potential to thrive academically and contribute to the university community.

One important aspect of the holistic admissions process at UNC Chapel Hill is the consideration of an applicant’s personal background and experiences. The university values diversity and seeks to create a student body representing various perspectives and backgrounds.

Therefore, applicants who have overcome significant challenges or unique life experiences may have an advantage in the admissions process.

In addition, UNC Chapel Hill also considers an applicant’s demonstrated interest in the university. This can include attending information sessions, visiting campus, and communicating with admissions counselors. Demonstrating a strong interest in the university can show that an applicant is serious about attending and is a good fit for the school’s community and values.

Tips for Prospective Students: How to Stand Out in the Admissions Process

For prospective students looking to stand out in the UNC Chapel Hill admissions process, there are several tips to remember. First and foremost, focus on academics and maintain a strong GPA while taking challenging courses.

In addition to academic achievement, get involved in extracurricular activities and take on leadership roles where possible. Make a meaningful impact in your activities, and use them to demonstrate your passion, skills, and character.

Lastly, take advantage of UNC-Chapel Hill’s opportunities and resources, such as visiting campus, attending information sessions, and connecting with admissions representatives. The school increases your chances of standing out in admissions by demonstrating your genuine interests.

Another important aspect to consider is writing a strong personal statement. This is your chance to showcase your unique qualities, experiences, and goals that make you a good fit for UNC Chapel Hill.

Take the time to reflect on your personal journey and what motivates you to pursue higher education. Be authentic and honest in your writing; proofread and edit your statement carefully.

Common Misconceptions About the UNC Chapel Hill Admissions Process

Several common misconceptions about the UNC Chapel Hill admissions process are worth addressing. One misconception is that the school only admits students with perfect GPAs and test scores.

While academic achievement is critical, UNC Chapel Hill takes a holistic approach to admissions and looks at the entire application, including extracurricular activities, essays, and recommendations.

a female student appears to be thinking

Another misconception is that legacy status or family connections can guarantee admission to UNC-Chapel Hill. While legacy status and family connections can be a factor in admissions, they do not guarantee admission. UNC Chapel Hill takes a merit-based approach to admissions and evaluates each applicant individually.

It is also important to note that UNC Chapel Hill values diversity and actively seeks to admit students from various backgrounds. When evaluating applicants, the admissions committee considers socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, and geographic location factors.

This means that even if a student does not have perfect GPA or test scores, they may still have a chance for admission if they bring unique experiences and perspectives to the campus community.

In conclusion, UNC Chapel Hill seeks well-rounded, passionate, and dedicated students who have demonstrated academic achievement, leadership, community involvement, and potential for growth and impact.

By understanding the factors UNC Chapel Hill considers in the admissions process and following the tips outlined in this article, prospective students can increase their chances of success in the application process .

It is important to note that UNC Chapel Hill also values diversity and inclusivity in its student body. The university actively seeks out students from various backgrounds, cultures, and experiences to create a vibrant and dynamic community on campus. The admissions process highly values students who bring unique perspectives and ideas.

Furthermore, UNC Chapel Hill offers various academic programs and extracurricular activities for students to explore and pursue their passions. From research opportunities to study abroad programs, there are ways for students to enhance their education and personal growth at UNC Chapel Hill.

Prospective students should research and explore the various opportunities available to them at the university.

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the college admission process? Look no further! AdmissionSight is here to guide you toward success. With our specialized college admission consultation service, we offer personalized assistance tailored to your unique goals and aspirations.

Our experienced consultants will provide expert advice on crafting a standout application, selecting the right colleges, and navigating the complex admissions world. Don’t let stress hold you back—let AdmissionSight be your trusted partner on your journey to higher education. Contact us today to take the first step toward a brighter future.

AdmissionSight

Want to assess your chances of admission? Take our FREE chances calculator today!

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

Why College Admissions Isn’t Perfect

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

US News Rankings

A person's hand writing in spiral notebook placed on a wooden desk.

The Personal Statement: The Holy Grail of College Admissions

Group of students taking ap classes in a classroom.

The Modern Day 4.0 and 1600 SAT Score Student Is No Longer Impressive

A woman writing a letter on a paper.

The Competitive Nature of College Admissions for Asian Americans

A professor talking to a student while they walk outside the classroom

The College Application

a woman sing laptop while "admission" word appears on screen

Our Comprehensive Approach

old school building

Ivy League Schools

a student daydreaming while sitting at the corner in library

How Early Should You Prepare for College?

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

Featured in US News & World Report Best Colleges Publication

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

Congratulations to AdmissionSight Students and their Acceptances!

A female student listening to the class lecture while holding a pen.

College Rejection

Group of students writing on their desks.

College Rankings

a fountain in front outside the building

College Consultants Could Make A Difference

A person holding a pen with a laptop in front.

College Admissions Scandal and Higher Education

A woman shaking hands with her interviewer.

How to Qualify for National Merit Semifinalist 2025

Female student smiling at the camera.

How to Update Yale After Submitting Your Application

a female student reading a letter

What Are the Score Choice Policies at Top 50 Universities?

Concentrated african american woman doing paperwork, sitting in modern office on conference.

How to Apply to LaunchX

Female student using a laptop for research.

How to Submit Supplemental Materials to Colleges

a medicine student sitting at the staircase looking at the camera

How to Apply for BS/DO Programs

Cornell University website through a magnifying lens

How to Update Cornell After Submitting Your Application

Columbia

How to Update Columbia After Submitting Your Application

Harvard.edu website homepage. Harvard logo visible.

How to Update Harvard After Submitting Your Application

A students using her laptop while sitting next to a wall.

What Should You Write in Your MIT FUN Form?

Young woman talking to two interviewers for internship

How to Secure an Internal Transfer and Dual Degree to Wharton

a student writing on her notebook and looking at the camera

100 Research Topics for High School Students

a female student walking in a pathway

SAT Test Dates and Deadlines for 2024-2025

business students brainstorming

How to Join the FBLA Competitive Events

Female student holding a folder in a room with her classmates.

How to Apply for the Coolidge Scholarship

Test score sheet with answers

Top 33 Colleges That Require Test Scores

View of a student working on a table.

How to Apply for RISE by Schmidt Futures and the Rhodes Trust

Leave a comment cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Recent Articles

How to Qualify for National Merit Semifinalist 2025

How to Qualify for National...

How to Update Yale After Submitting Your Application

How to Update Yale After...

What Are the Score Choice Policies at Top 50 Universities?

What Are the Score Choice...

How to Apply to LaunchX

How to Submit Supplemental Materials...

How to Apply for BS/DO Programs

How to Apply for BS/DO...

How to Update Cornell After Submitting Your Application

How to Update Cornell After...

How to Update Columbia After Submitting Your Application

How to Update Columbia After...

How to Update Harvard After Submitting Your Application

How to Update Harvard After...

What Should You Write in Your MIT FUN Form?

What Should You Write in...

How to Secure an Internal Transfer and Dual Degree to Wharton

How to Secure an Internal...

100 Research Topics for High School Students

100 Research Topics for High...

Sign up now to receive insights on how to navigate the college admissions process..

admissionsight

Admissions Counseling

  • Academic & Extracurricular Profile Evaluation

Copyright © AdmissionSight 2024

Privacy Policy - Terms and Conditions

What are your chances of acceptance?

Calculate for all schools, your chance of acceptance.

 UNC

Your chancing factors

Extracurriculars.

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

Strong UNC Chapel Hill Essay Example

UNC Chapel Hill is a pretty selective school, especially for out-of-state students, so it’s important to write strong essays to help your application stand out. In this post, we’ll share an essay a real student has submitted to UNC Chapel Hill. (Names and identifying information have been changed, but all other details are preserved).

Please note: Looking at examples of real essays students have submitted to colleges can be very beneficial to get inspiration for your essays. You should never copy or plagiarize from these examples when writing your own essays. Colleges can tell when an essay isn’t genuine and will not view students favorably if they plagiarized. 

Read our UNC Chapel Hill es say breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year’s supplemental prompts.

Prompt: If you could change one thing about where you live, what would it be and why? (200-250 words).

Sitting behind the loaded plates on our dinner table, I predicted my mom’s first question with 100% accuracy: “So, how did you do on the trigonometry test today?” Notorious for failing math classes, my brother paused from chewing his chicken wing. 

I knew he’d be in trouble. 

Indeed, after hearing his grade, my mom scolded: “Look at our neighbor’s kid; then look at you! She never gets anything below a 90!”

There it is again: “the neighbor’s kid,” a Chinese concept that I wish would serve a different purpose. Upon learning about their children’s unsatisfactory academic performance, Chinese parents often bring up a so-called perfect neighbor’s kid for comparison. It saddens me to see individuals raised under the shadow of “the neighbor’s kid” not able to simply enjoy exploring knowledge. They toil through years of schooling for good grades and a prestigious college’s acceptance letter at the cost of their mental well-being. Worse, some measure their self-worth by grades alone: my brother believes he’s not good enough, despite all his admirable traits outside of academics. 

Instead of “the neighbor’s kid who got a good grade” at the dinner table, I suggested my parents discuss “the neighbor’s kid who sells bracelets to raise money for charity”  or “who had a hot discussion with the teacher about whether animals have consciousness.” I look forward to a more vibrant and colorful dinner conversation, where families talk about their roses and thorns of the day, rather than a neighbor’s kid defined by numbers.

What the Essay Did Well

This essay does a great job of opening with a strong anecdote and seamlessly transitioning the anecdote into an answer to the prompt. The reader feels the suspense of sitting at the dinner table with the student and their family waiting for the response to their mom’s question, and might even relate to hearing the student’s parents complain about their grade. It’s a simple and quick story, but everyone can find something in it they relate to, which makes the reader want to keep reading.

The essay was also successful at transitioning from a personal anecdote to a broader topic that addresses the prompt. The anecdote is connected to the larger issue the student has with their home environment and provides context for their reasoning that growing up surrounded by this mentality is harmful. The use of the anecdote bolsters the entire essay by perfectly setting up the student’s response to the prompt, rather than being an out-of-place inclusion to add some empathy or imagery, which is a common mistake with anecdotes.

Another positive aspect of this essay is how the student’s passion for the issue shines through. The reader learns a good deal about the student’s family life and familiarity with the “the neighbor’s kid.” The student’s expressed sadness and disapproval at not being able to enjoy learning because the immense amount of stress their parents place on them to get good grades is evident when they said, “ They toil through years of schooling for good grades and a prestigious college’s acceptance letter at the cost of their mental well-being.” The inclusion of the student’s brother also shows how close this issue is to the student’s heart because they are watching stereotypes harm someone they love. The details and direct language included provide strong evidence for why the student wants to change this aspect of where they live, which is the most important part of the prompt to address.

What Could Be Improved

For the most part, this is a great essay. The one thing that could be improved is the last paragraph that explains what the student wants to change. As far as the reader knows, the suggestions the student makes to discuss “the neighbor’s kid who sells bracelets” or “the neighbor’s kid who had a hot discussion with the teacher” are random topics the student chose to contrast with the idea of valuing a kid for a numerical grade. Since these appear as random topics, it distracts from other qualities the student and their brother might possess and want to showcase to their parents.

In an essay that is focused on changing the norm of equating worth with a grade, it would reveal more about what the student wants to be recognized for if they mentioned topics of conversation that related back to their interests. For example, if the student liked to ice skate and play the trumpet they could say: “Instead of the dreaded question about my grades, my parents would ask about how my axel is coming along or what new song I’m considering for the winter concert.” An ending more like this, that discusses the student’s interests rather than randomly mentioning other students, still achieves the same goal of the student not wanting to solely be measured by a number, but conveys the idea while also providing more insight into the student and what they value.

Where to Get Your UNC Chapel Hill  Essays Edited

Do you want feedback on your UNC Chapel Hill essays? After rereading your essays countless times, it can be difficult to evaluate your writing objectively. That’s why we created our free Peer Essay Review tool , where you can get a free review of your essay from another student. You can also improve your own writing skills by reviewing other students’ essays. 

If you want a college admissions expert to review your essay, advisors on CollegeVine have helped students refine their writing and submit successful applications to top schools. Find the right advisor for you to improve your chances of getting into your dream school!

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  • Make a gift
  • ConnectCarolina
  • Information for:
  • Prospective students
  • Current students
  • Faculty and staff
  • Alumni and friends

Instructions for Graduate Applicants

Welcome graduate applicants! We are pleased that you are applying for admission to the UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate School. Admission to Graduate School academic programs is competitive and students are selected on the basis of their academic preparation, ability, and program fit. For some programs, an on-site pre-admissions interview may be required. Early contact with your program of interest can be helpful in preparing your application.

Please see the listing of program contact information and application deadlines.

International applicants have an additional application material requirement.

The Graduate School relies mainly on email to communicate with all applicants. Therefore, please include a current email address on your application and be sure to promptly respond to all correspondence.

Required Application Materials

Required materials for all applicants typically include:

  • Graduate School online application »
  • Application fee (non-refundable $95.00)
  • One unofficial transcript from each university attended must be uploaded within the application. All unofficial transcripts must be uploaded to your application in order for your application to be reviewed. Please do not mail transcripts as part of your admission application; we only accept unofficial uploads for application evaluation. If you are offered admission, one official transcript for each university attended will be required prior to registration.
  • The email addresses of three recommenders are required within the application for electronic submission.

Please see specific program listings for test score requirement information.

  • Statement of purpose

Community Standards Questions

  • Supplemental program information (any additional information or materials required by the program; must be uploaded within the application unless specified otherwise by your academic program.)

The starting point for writing statements of purpose and other application requirements should be applicant-generated. While the use of generative AI tools may be useful for structuring and editing writing, it should primarily be the voice of the applicant. Any use of AI must be cited clearly.

For International Applicants only:

  • TOEFL or IELTS score (no more than 2 years old as of the date of application submission)

Minimum Graduate Admission Requirements

The minimum requirements are:

  • a bachelor's degree (based on a four-year curriculum) completed before graduate study begins or its international equivalent with an accredited institution
  • an average grade of B (cumulative GPA 3.0) or better

Along with these minimal requirements, admission decisions are based on a number of factors, including academic degrees and record, written statement of purpose, letters of recommendation, test scores, and relevant work and research experience. All admission recommendations are made by each individual program or department.

Application Process

Applications for admission to the UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate School are submitted via the online admission application . All required materials listed above should be submitted according to the instructions provided. Your application will not be reviewed until you have submitted your application and we have received your application fee. You must submit your application and payment by your program's specific deadline in order for your application to be reviewed. By submitting an application to UNC-Chapel Hill, you grant consent to university staff to obtain any additional or missing information as needed, including campus safety information.

Application Deadlines

Please be aware that each program has a specific application deadline . Most programs admit students for the fall semester only, however a few programs allow spring or summer session admissions. Please see the listing of graduate programs and their application deadlines for accepted terms of entry.

Each offer of admission is specific for the term stated in the admission letter. If you do not register for classes you must apply again in a subsequent semester; application materials that are submitted to this institution are kept on file for one year after the term for which you are applying. Contact your intended program for questions about deferrals of admission offers.

Completed applications and application fees (non-refundable) must be submitted before the program's application deadline. The application and payment portal close at 11:59pm Eastern Time on the posted deadline date.

Applications will not be accepted for review or consideration after the posted graduate program deadline has passed. International applicants should apply early to allow sufficient time for financial and visa document preparation. The Graduate School recommends that international applicants submit a complete application no later than November 28 .

Fellowship and Financial Aid Deadlines

Most of the financial support available to graduate students is based within individual programs. In addition, a limited amount of financial support is available from The Graduate School and is based upon nominations from individual programs. In order to allow sufficient time for your program to nominate you for Graduate School fellowships, we recommend that your application be submitted by December 12, 2023 .

If your program continues to accept applications after December 12, 2023 , you are still eligible for their program-based support. Contact your intended program for complete information about available graduate student financial support and relevant deadlines.

The University awards loans and Tuition Enhancement Grants to graduate students who qualify, based on information provided in the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form due March 1. For more information, please visit the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid .

Application Fees

A non-refundable $95.00 application fee is required for each program to which you apply.

Applicants can pay their application fee one of three ways:

  • Credit/Debit card (Visa/MasterCard/Discover). For security purposes, the credit card address manually inserted during the final payment process must exactly match the credit card billing address for a successful transaction. If you initially receive a payment error when attempting to pay the application fee by credit card, we first suggest that you switch internet browsers and attempt the payment action again. Common error codes are -1724 (billing address incorrect) and -1777 (international applicants will encounter this general card failure and often require pre-authorization from card issuer). If you encounter subsequent payment errors when attempting to pay the application fee by credit card, please email [email protected] and include the error code you received with your payment attempt.
  • Check or money order . Mail-in payments are restricted to a check (in U.S. funds) that contains the pre-printed electronic routing numbers or an international money order. All check or money order payments should be made payable to The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. If choosing to pay by check or money order, you will receive an email with further payment instructions, including the payment mailing address. Please ensure that any check or money order payment mailed to The Graduate School includes your full name as it appears on your application, your application ID number, and current contact information. Your application fee must be postmarked no later than your application deadline date or it will be returned. Applications that arrive without the required application fee will remain on file, unprocessed, pending receipt of the application fee. If someone is paying the application fee for you, please ensure they include your name, application ID number, and current contact information, as well.

Submit fee waiver requests and required documentation within your online admissions application. Please do not mail fee waiver documentation. We will review fee waiver requests only after you have submitted your application. We will send additional information, including status updates, via email. After you have submitted a fee waiver request, please allow several days for your request to be reviewed. If you submit an application with a request for a fee waiver near the application submission deadline for your program, your fee waiver request will not be reviewed until after the deadline. Please check with the academic program to which you are applying for more information on their timeline.

Transcripts

An unofficial transcript from any post-secondary education experience (including community colleges, summer sessions and extension programs) is required to be uploaded in the application. Each unofficial transcript must be complete (not select courses), include grades, be issued in the original language and be accompanied by certified English translations when applicable. You may upload unofficial transcripts before mid-year grades are posted. Applicants will be able to upload optional, updated unofficial transcripts from their current institution, if applicable, after submitting their application.

You should obtain a copy of your unofficial transcript (obtained from a student account) as “official” transcripts do not scan well. You should follow the instructions in the application for uploading unofficial transcripts, including:

  • Scan multiple page transcripts into one file.
  • Preview your uploaded transcript(s) to ensure legibility so that the processing of your application is not delayed. If you cannot read the file clearly, please try another scanner or different settings and upload again.

Study Abroad experiences that appear on your undergraduate institution transcript do not need to be listed separately on the application.

Transfer credit posted on the transcript from other institutions is not accepted in lieu of transcripts from the original institution attended.

The Graduate School does not accept and will not retain paper or electronic transcripts sent as part of your admissions application. Please do not request that electronic or paper transcripts be sent as part of your application; we only accept unofficial uploads for application evaluation.

 If you are offered admission, one official transcript for each university attended is required prior to registration. Instructions for how to submit official transcripts will be included in the admission offer letter.

Transcripts will not be kept on file in The Graduate School for admitted students who did not accept their admission offer from a previous admissions cycle or who did not enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill.

A note on foreign degrees:

As part of the transcript submission process, degree credentials are also reviewed. Assessment of a foreign degree, including those conferred from institutions participating in the Bologna Accord, is based upon the characteristics of a national system of education, the type of institution attended, its accreditation and the level of studies completed. The following guidelines indicate the level of study expected of international applicants prior to graduate enrollment:

  • British patterned education bachelor's degree with honours
  • French patterned education degree of diplome requiring four years of post baccalauréat study
  • Germany university Diplom preferred. Applicants with very strong academic records may be considered if they have completed the Staatsexamen, a bachelor's degree after a 13-year Abitur, or at least one year of full-time study beyond the Vorprfung, Zwischenprfung, Vordiplom, or any other bachelor's degree
  • Other European countries: university degree requiring a minimum of four years of study
  • Canada three-year bachelor's degree from Québec; four-year bachelor's degree from all other provinces
  • Latin America university degree requiring a minimum of four years of study
  • India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal bachelor's degree in engineering or medicine; master's degree in all other fields
  • Philippines five-year bachelor's degree or four year bachelor's degree plus one year of graduate work
  • Other Asian countries: university degree requiring a minimum of four years of study

If you do not clearly meet the specific criteria above, you may be asked to provide a certified credit evaluation showing that you have earned the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree. If you only have a 3-year degree or otherwise do not meet the educational requirements for graduate admission, you are welcome to consider other admission options available at UNC admissions .

Letters of Recommendation

Three current letters of recommendation from persons qualified to evaluate your academic and professional qualifications are required. You should solicit recommendations from individuals who are familiar with your academic achievement and who can address your potential for success in this particular academic setting. If you have been out of school for a number of years and are unable to contact former professors, letters from other individuals who can address your achievement and potential will be accepted. We advise against using generic letters of recommendation such as those provided by campus career planning and placement offices. Please see the information and instructions specific to your intended program for more information.

The online application will prompt you to submit the names and email addresses for your three required recommenders.

Email invitations will be sent to recommenders once you select 'Save' in the online application. You can also update recommender information and send reminder emails to your recommenders within the online application.

Standardized Test Scores

UNC Graduate School Institution Code: #5816 (no department code)

We recommend that you plan to take any required exams no later than October to allow time for scores to arrive in time for consideration for fall admission.

Standardized test scores must be official and reported directly by the Educational Testing Service ( ETS ). They must be current and no more than five years old.

In order for a test score to be considered complete, applicants must provide a numeric score in all sections of the GRE.

Standardized test scores that are submitted to this institution are kept on file for one year after the term for which you are applying.

When you register for any tests, you should indicate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School (institution # 5816 ) as a score recipient. If you did not specify the UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate School as a score recipient at the time of taking the test, you must promptly ask ETS to send your scores to us (institution # 5816 ). No departmental code is required.

GMAT scores should be sent to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Kenan-Flagler Business School – Other Graduate Programs (code D40-HL-34), or Kenan-Flagler Business School – PhD Program (code D40-HL-50)

While self-reported scores are useful for informal evaluation, we cannot complete the final review or offer admission until we have received the official report of your scores.

Please note: If you submitted your official test scores to UNC-CH with your application, expect a minimum of seven business days for your test scores to be matched to your application.

If you have taken, or plan to take, an official test more than one time and wish for additional scores to be available as part of your application review, you must request that each set of official scores be sent to the University. All valid, official test scores that have been sent to the University will be available as part of the application review process.

If you already hold, or are in the process of earning, a research or professional doctorate degree, you may be exempted from the standardized test score requirement. This waiver request must come to The Graduate School directly from the academic program to which you are applying. An unofficial transcript showing degree awarded, or degree in progress, will be required for final approval of this exemption by The Graduate School. Please contact your intended academic program to determine if they will support this exemption.

Average scores of applicants offered admission

International applicants must also submit official TOEFL or IELTS standardized test scores. We do not accept other English language proficiency tests.

Statement of Purpose

All graduate programs require a written statement to be uploaded within your application. The form and content requirements may vary by program. Please read the information and instructions specific to your intended program before applying. Your written statement is a critical component of your application for admission and can sometimes be the determining factor in approval of admittance or financial support. Therefore, your statement should reflect your professional goals, as well as familiarity with the program and faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill.

The starting point for writing statements of purpose should be applicant-generated. While the use of generative AI tools may be useful for structuring and editing writing, it should primarily be the voice of the applicant. Any use of AI must be cited clearly.

All graduate programs require a resume or CV to be uploaded within your application. Your resume/CV should provide information about your work and volunteer experiences, research, awards, recognitions and activities pertinent to your proposed program of study.

Applicants for admission will be asked several questions regarding criminal pleas, charges and convictions, academic and conduct-related suspensions from post-secondary educational institutions, and military discharges (i.e., the University’s “Community Standards Questions”). You must describe violations of law in your home country and in any other country in which you have resided and visited. The term “law” includes codes, legal rules and regulations, and other criminal-type statutes or violations of municipal, local, provincial, state, federal, national, commonwealth, and other governmental jurisdiction.

If additional information is needed, you may be asked to submit information for a criminal background check, including a nominal fee, and asked to provide additional information to the graduate program and Graduate School. Depending on the circumstances, affirmative disclosures by an applicant may also be concurrently reviewed by the Office of Dean of Students or the University’s Emergency Evaluation Action Committee , for a determination as to whether the applicant’s previous behavior could impact University community, property, or processes.

An affirmative response to a community standards question does not automatically preclude an applicant from being offered admission to, or enrollment in, a graduate program within The Graduate School. Rather, each response is reviewed holistically in conjunction with an assessment of the applicant’s overall candidacy and application for admission, including an assessment of their academic record, personal qualities and experiences, and integrity and character.

Failure to provide complete, accurate, and truthful information will be grounds to deny or withdraw your admission, or to dismiss you after enrollment. The same actions will occur if you fail to notify The Graduate School promptly in writing of such charges that occur at any time after you submit the application.

Application Status

Once we have received all required application materials and fees, the review and evaluation of your application will begin. You may monitor the status of your application checklist through the application website .

It is your responsibility to monitor your application for completeness by logging into your application and checking your application status. If your official test scores do not appear as received within two weeks of submitting your application, please email [email protected] .

You will be able to upload optional, updated unofficial transcripts from your current institution, if applicable, after submitting your application. Additionally, you may be asked to upload specific additional materials through your application status page after submission. The Graduate School cannot alter any application materials once your application is submitted. If you would like to send new information or updated documents to the academic program to which you applied, please contact the program directly .

For International Applicants only

Together with the instructions above, international applicants are also required to submit official TOEFL or IELTS scores as part of their application. The Graduate School understands it is difficult and sometimes confusing to apply to universities in another country, and we will assist you in clarifying requirements whenever possible.

TOEFL or IELTS Score

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Graduate Admissions Code ( FOR TOEFL ONLY ): #5816 (no department code)

We do not accept Duolingo or any other English proficiency test scores.

All international applicants must submit acceptable, official TOEFL scores (reported directly to school code #5816 from ETS.org ) or IELTS scores (reported directly from IELTS.org , either by mail or electronically to The Graduate School). We do not accept TOEFL MyBest scores, Duolingo, or other English language proficiency tests.

Standardized test scores must be official and are reportable for a period of two years from the date of the exam. Exam results more than two years old cannot be considered.

When you register for any tests, you should indicate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School as a score recipient. If you did not specify the UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate School as a score recipient at the time of taking the test, you must promptly ask to send your scores to us. While self-reported scores are useful for informal evaluation, the official report of your scores must arrive before final review and admission can be offered.

If you have taken, or plan to take, an official test more than one time and wish for additional scores to be available as part of your application review, you must request that each set of official scores be sent to the University. All valid, official test scores that have been sent to the University will be available as part of the application review process.

The required minimum total score on the exams are:

  • The internet-based TOEFL exam = 90
  • The IELTS exam = 7

Some programs have their own minimal score requirements which are higher than those stated above, in which case these higher standards will be required.

Exceptions to the English Standardized exams are available for the three categories listed below:

  • No additional documentation is needed to qualify for this category.
  • To qualify for a waiver in this category, you must upload an unofficial transcript showing degree awarded or in progress, or a letter from your Registrar or Dean verifying your degree candidate status from that institution within the online admissions application. If you are offered admission, the official transcript must be received, or the English exam scores will be required to enroll.
  • To qualify for a waiver in this category, you must submit an official verification from that university that English is the SOLE language of instruction along with your anticipated date of graduation. If the degree or an official verification is not received, the English exam scores will again be required.

Applicants in category 1 will automatically receive the exception. If you believe you qualify for a waiver of the English standardized exam under categories 2 or 3, you must indicate this request and upload the appropriate documentation within the online admissions application.

All newly admitted international students will be reviewed for their level of English proficiency prior to enrolling for classes. You will receive communications from the University regarding English language, writing, and speaking support services to support your transition to our campus.

Financial Certification

International applicants who are offered admission to a graduate program are required by United States federal regulations to certify that you have sufficient funds to pay for your expenses at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the entire length of your studies. Every international applicant offered admission, including applicants who may receive teaching or research assistantships or other awards, must complete and upload the International Student Data Form and Financial Certification Instructions/Worksheet to their ConnectCarolina Student Center after being offered admission. The Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) will send you information and instructions for completing and uploading these forms in order to document that you meet necessary financial requirements. ISSS will then send you the appropriate documents to use in obtaining or updating your visa once it has been determined that you have met the necessary financial requirements.

International applicants in need of financial aid may write to the Institute of International Education, 809 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017, or review the IIE website .

The University's Office of Scholarships and Student Aid can only fund students who are U.S. citizens, nationals, permanent residents with I-151 or I-551 Alien Registration Receipt Cards, permanent residents of the Northern Mariana Islands and the Trust Territory or the Pacific Islands, and other non-citizens who have Arrival-Departure Records (I-94) showing "refugee" or "adjustment applicant" or official grant of asylum in the United States. Students who meet these requirements should apply for financial assistance before March 1.

For any additional questions, please contact our Admissions Office .

Calculate for all schools

Your chance of acceptance, your chancing factors, extracurriculars, entrance requirements for unc.

Hi everyone, I hope you're all doing well. I'm in the process of creating my college list and I'm really interested in UNC. Can anyone provide some insight on their entrance requirements? Thanks in advance!

Hello! It's awesome that you're considering UNC as one of your potential colleges. UNC is a public research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and it provides strong academic programs in various fields. To give you an idea of the entrance requirements, here is what you need to know:

1. Academic performance: UNC values strong academic records in rigorous high school coursework. Applicants usually have a high GPA, and they often take Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or honors courses to demonstrate their commitment to academics.

2. Standardized tests: While UNC Chapel Hill is officially test-optional, at selective institutions you generally want to showcase your strengths in as many ways as possible, so submitting an SAT or ACT score could still be a good idea. Generally speaking, you'd want to aim for a score above 1400 or above 30 on the ACT. If you want more detailed guidance on how to navigate test-optional policies, check out this blog post from CollegeVine: https://blog.collegevine.com/does-test-optional-mean-test-optional

3. Extracurricular activities: UNC looks for well-rounded students who have shown passion and commitment in their extracurricular activities. Aim to have a mix of extracurriculars that demonstrate leadership, community engagement, and personal interests.

4. Essays and recommendations: Personal statements and supplemental essays will help the admissions team get to know you beyond your academic achievements, so make sure to craft compelling essays that highlight your personality, experiences, and aspirations. If you're looking for tips on how to tackle UNC's school-specific supplemental essays in particular, check out this blog post from CollegeVine: https://blog.collegevine.com/how-to-write-the-unc-chapel-hill-essays/. Additionally, strong recommendations from your teachers and counselors will be crucial in providing context for your academic, personal, and extracurricular achievements.

5. Demonstrated interest: While demonstrated interest is not a significant factor in the admissions process at UNC, attending virtual events and connecting with the college can provide useful information for you to mention in your application and help you understand if the school is a good fit for you.

When applying to UNC, you'll want to have a competitive profile that checks off these boxes. It is also essential to research the specific requirements for your chosen major or program, as different departments may have unique prerequisites or expectations.

Keep in mind that UNC, like many universities, practices a holistic admissions process, which means all parts of your application will be taken into account. So, give yourself enough time to create a solid application that showcases your strengths and why UNC is the right choice for you through each component. Good luck!

About CollegeVine’s Expert FAQ

CollegeVine’s Q&A seeks to offer informed perspectives on commonly asked admissions questions. Every answer is refined and validated by our team of admissions experts to ensure it resonates with trusted knowledge in the field.

  • UNC Chapel Hill

The Program

Students must complete all First-Year Foundation requirements, all Reflection & Integration requirements, and complete at least six Focus Capacity requirements. Please visit  IDEAs in Action General Education curriculum  for specific information regarding the general education course requirements. Additionally, the following pre-admission math/science courses are required:

PRE-REQUISITE LIST

  • MATH 130 or MATH 231
  • CHEM 101/L or BIOC 107

TRANSFER CREDIT EQUIVALENCY

The UNC Transfer Credit list provides a list of courses that students have previously transferred to UNC Chapel Hill from other community college or four-year institutes. 

  UNC Chapel Hill Transfer Credit List

Application Process

Application may be submitted prior to completing all course requirements but decisions will be given on a conditional basis if that is the case. All general education requirements need to be completed prior to being admitted.

Applicants will be reviewed using the following criteria:

  • Clarity and quality of personal statement
  • Academic progress and promise
  • Supportive references
  • Knowledge of the field

If you need to apply for an F-1 Visa, please contact us before you apply to our program!

Application Instructions

Current unc chapel hill students (internal):.

Click the button above and log in to the ConnectCarolina Student Center. In the “other academic” dropdown, select “Apply for Change of Major.” Once you complete and submit this request, you will receive an email with instructions for completing your application.

Transfer Students:

  • Go to the Common Application to create an account and start your application.
  • Submit the application, the common application supplement, and the application fee by the deadline.
  • Upload the essay requested in your common application supplement.
  • Submit the official transcript from all secondary and post-secondary schools to:University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Office of Undergraduate Admissions Jackson Hall, Campus Box 2200 Chapel Hill, NC  27599-2200
  • Arrange to have two letters of recommendations written on your behalf sent to [email protected]. Recommendations should be completed by college professors or teaching assistants who are familiar with your academic abilities, work supervisors, or volunteer project supervisors.

You must apply to UNC and to the NDSS program through Undergraduate Admissions. When you indicate that you are applying to the NDSS program, you should also get the NDSS-specific questions on your application.

Application Deadlines

Internal students –, spring 2025 application (no separate admission periods) :.

Open date: July 1, 2024, via Slate

Close date: September 27, 2024

Fall 2025 Application:

Open Date: October 16, 2024, via Slate

Close Date : May, 15, 2025

December 1 March 15 May 15
Late February Early April Late May

Transfer students –

Application open date : August 1 st , 2024, via Common App

Application close date: February 15 th , 2025

*There is no Transfer Student application in the Spring.*

University Admissions Policy

For information regarding the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Admissions Policy, click on the link below: UNC-Chapel Hill Admissions Policy .

Non-Degree Applicants

For information regarding applying as a non-degree student please work with the UNC-Chapel Hill Digital and Lifelong Learning Office. See information below on applying:

HOW TO APPLY

The application process varies according to your status:

  • If you are a  new undergraduate applicant , apply online using the online application form (see  How to Apply ).
  • If you are a  new postbaccalaureate applicant,  apply using the  online application form . To begin your application, you must create an account.

Contact Information

If you have any additional questions or concerns, please contact [email protected] .

UNC-Chapel Hill in top 5 of The Princeton Review’s best value colleges

Carolina is second among public universities for financial aid.

Exterior photo of the Old Well outside during the day.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is ranked No. 4 in The Princeton Review’s annual list of best public universities for value.

The college admissions service company considered several factors in compiling its list of 209 best-value schools, including academics, costs, financial aid, debt, graduation rates and alumni career and salary data. Lists were divided by public and private institutions. Carolina moved up from No. 7 in last year’s list.

Carolina also ranked second on the list of public universities for financial aid and No. 9 for best schools for making an impact. The latter is based on student survey responses to questions about community service opportunities, student government, sustainability efforts and on-campus student engagement.

“We are extremely proud of our ability to provide a high-quality and nationally competitive education while remaining affordable and accessible,” said Interim Chancellor Lee H. Roberts. “Our goal is to ensure that each of our outstanding students can gain a college degree without the burden of college debt. This recognition by The Princeton Review is reflective of our hardworking and dedicated faculty and staff, our generous donors and the exceptional longstanding support of North Carolina’s taxpayers.”

Last fall, U.S. News & World Report ranked UNC-Chapel Hill as the No. 4 public university in the country and No. 22 overall.

A team led by Dr. Arlene Seña is cataloging samples of syphilis patients to help fight the disease.

The Carolina field hockey team posing for a team photo with the NCAA championship trophy on the field at Karen Shelton Stadium on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill

Carolina 7th in final Learfield Directors’ Cup standings

This is the Tar Heels' fifth-consecutive top-10 finish and their eighth top-10 effort in the past nine years.

Headshot of Jessica Grant against Carolina Blue border.

Jessica Grant named interim director of Odum Institute

Grant will be the first woman to lead the institute in its 100-year history.

Exterior photo of Eshelman School of Pharmacy building in the daytime.

Eshelman ranked No. 1 in pharmacy research funding

The school earned the top spot from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy with more than $92 million in grants in FY23.

A large tree, named Davie Poplar, on a grassy quad called McCorkle Place on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.

On-campus filming production will impact operations, traffic and parking July 5-12

Find information on road closures, parking changes and alterations to pedestrian routes.

Robert L. Ferris headshot over blue background

Robert L. Ferris named Lineberger executive director

The Carolina alumnus comes to Chapel Hill from the Hillman Cancer Center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Frisbee player runs through tunnel of supporters holding hands above after victory.

Pleiades are a flying disc dynasty

The Carolina women’s team won its fourth-straight national title in the sport also known as “ultimate Frisbee.”

Two men and two women posing next to products wearing

Seal the Seasons now top US locally grown food brand

Started by Carolina students in 2015, the flash frozen produce company creates new markets for family farmers.

Share on Mastodon

IMAGES

  1. How to Get Into UNC Chapel Hill Guide

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  2. Best Personal Statement Examples in 2023 + Why Do They Work?

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  3. READING THE ESSAYS THAT GOT ME INTO UNC CHAPEL HILL

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  4. 44+ Thesis Statement For Personal Essay Examples Most Popular

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  5. Writing a Strong Personal Statement for College: Tips and Ideas

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

  6. 💋 Writing a personal statement for college application. 5 Tips On How

    is a personal statement or essay required for unc chapel hill

VIDEO

  1. Collective Reading: They're Under Judgement & Not Liking It! Your Light Is Exposing Them! #judgement

  2. UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees Meeting

COMMENTS

  1. Application Prompts for 2023-2024

    We've selected the following prompts for the UNC-specific portion for the first-year and transfer applications for 2023-2024. We're proud of the Carolina community and how each student makes us better through their excellence, intellect, and character. In reading your responses, we hope to learn what being a part of the Carolina community ...

  2. How to Write the UNC Chapel Hill Essays 2023-2024

    In order to stand out from the crowd, you will need to write exceptional essays that blow the admissions committee away. This year, UNC Chapel Hill requires all applicants to submit two short responses under 250 words. Students interested in going abroad through the Global Fellowship program will be required to submit an additional essay.

  3. Application Essays

    The Writing Center Campus Box #5135 0127 SASB North 450 Ridge Road Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (919) 962-7710 [email protected]

  4. I Reviewed My Admissions Profile from UNC-Chapel Hill

    Applicants receive either a 1, 3, 5, 7, or 10 as their category ranking. I received a 7 for this category: I had two major leadership activities that influenced my entire district, VP of National Honor Society, and consistently worked 30+ hours a week since grade 9. PERSONAL QUALITIES (average ranking: 5): The AO leading my admissions profile ...

  5. PDF Writing an Effective Statement of Purpose/Personal Statement

    Personal Statement. (more biographical) Focus on the intersection of your personal, academic, and professional lives. Detail various life experiences that have developed your character, work-ethic, and perspective. Explain how your background particularly suits your for this program and/or will allow you to contribute a unique perspective to ...

  6. First-Year Application

    For students applying for the 2025-2026 academic year, students with a weighted GPA of 2.8 or above (on a 4.0 scale) are not required to submit a test score. Students with a weighted GPA below 2.8 (on a 4.0 scale) are required to submit either an ACT or SAT score. For students applying for the 2026-2027 academic year and beyond, students with a ...

  7. Personal Statement

    The Basics of Writing a Personal Statement. You should be clear and concise in your writing. Admissions committees are looking for a coherent essay with no spelling or grammatical errors. The length of your essay may vary depending on each school's requirements. If you are submitting your applications through AMCAS, there is a 5,300 character ...

  8. 3 Tips for Writing Stellar UNC Chapel Hill Supplement Essays

    What Are the UNC Essay Prompts? UNC Chapel Hill uses the Common Application for its admissions process. As a first-year applicant, you'll be required to write a total of three essays: one Common Application essay and two UNC-specific essays. The UNC supplemental essays are two 200-250 word essays that respond to UNC-specific questions.

  9. PDF Structure of a personal statement

    Following the guidelines above, describe your current project Examples of Personal Statement Prompts. 1) Submit a Personal Goals Statement (Psychology, UNC) 2) Your statement of purpose should provide readers of your application with a strong sense of your skill in, and commitment to, advanced graduate study in English.

  10. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    7. Upload your Statement of Purpose. The essay is a critical piece of the admissions process. We will evaluate both the content of the essay and your writing skills in considering your application. All applicants should write an essay of 1000 words or less. In this essay, please address the following questions:

  11. FAQs

    Will I be required to submit a personal statement? You will not be required to submit a personal statement. There are five essay questions that should each have a response of approximately 300 words (2000 characters). ... If you did not specify the UNC-Chapel Hill Graduate School (code 5816) as a score recipient at the time of taking the test ...

  12. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    If you are admitted and choose to enroll, UNC will require official transcript(s) showing degree(s) awarded. 6. Community standards. You will be asked about honor code, crime, academic sanction, military discharge, etc. 7. Upload your personal statement. Upload a brief essay (up to 4 pages in length) that addresses the issues listed below.

  13. How to Apply

    The Professional Statement offers the Admission Committee insight into your professional goals and graduate school expectations and helps us get to know you. ... and Prospective Students in one of UNC Chapel Hill's nursing programs satisfy the professional and/or certification requirements in North Carolina and prepare students to sit for ...

  14. JD and Dual Degree Applicants

    Personal statement. This is your opportunity to share why you want to join the legal profession, and why you are interested in Carolina Law. ... Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380 Phone: 919-962-5106 "facebook" "twitter" "instagram" "linkedin" The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ...

  15. What Does UNC Chapel Hill Look for in Prospective Students?

    The Importance of Academic Achievement in UNC Chapel Hill Admissions. As with most universities, academic achievement is critical in UNC Chapel Hill admissions. The school seeks students who have taken challenging courses and have excelled in their academic pursuits. Specifically, UNC Chapel Hill looks at a student's grade point average ( GPA ...

  16. ABSN How to Apply

    Essays are to be uploaded as your Personal Statement in the Documents section of the application. Because we don't have the opportunity to meet or interview all of our applicants personally, we ask that you help us get to know you better through the required essays. ... All essay questions are required. ... The University of North Carolina at ...

  17. Strong UNC Chapel Hill Essay Example

    Strong UNC Chapel Hill Essay Example. UNC Chapel Hill is a pretty selective school, especially for out-of-state students, so it's important to write strong essays to help your application stand out. In this post, we'll share an essay a real student has submitted to UNC Chapel Hill. (Names and identifying information have been changed, but ...

  18. Applying to the CLS Program

    Applicants should indicate that they are applying to the CLS program, and should also get the CLS-specific questions on their application. Current UNC-Chapel Hill Students only: Log in to the ConnectCarolina Student Center. In the "other academic" dropdown, select "Apply for Change of Major.". Once the request is completed and submitted ...

  19. Instructions for Graduate Applicants

    Your written statement is a critical component of your application for admission and can sometimes be the determining factor in approval of admittance or financial support. Therefore, your statement should reflect your professional goals, as well as familiarity with the program and faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill.

  20. UNC Chapel Hill admission requirements?

    UNC Chapel Hill, like most colleges, has a holistic admissions process, meaning they evaluate various aspects of a student's application, including GPA, test scores, extracurricular activities, and essays. Nonetheless, here are some general admission requirements for UNC Chapel Hill: 1. GPA: While there's no minimum GPA requirement for admission, the average unweighted GPA for admitted ...

  21. Entrance Requirements for UNC?

    UNC is a public research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and it provides strong academic programs in various fields. ... and personal interests. 4. Essays and recommendations: Personal statements and supplemental essays will help the admissions team get to know you beyond your academic achievements, so make sure to craft ...

  22. How to Write the UNC-Chapel Hill Supplemental Essay

    UNC Chapel Hill Supplemental Essay Prompt #1. Discuss one of your personal qualities and share a story, anecdote, or memory of how it helped you make a positive impact on a community. This could be your current community or another community you have engaged. (250 word limit) UNC Chapel Hill Supplemental Essay Prompt #2

  23. The Program

    For information regarding the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Admissions Policy, click on the link below: UNC-Chapel Hill Admissions Policy. Non-Degree Applicants. For information regarding applying as a non-degree student please work with the UNC-Chapel Hill Digital and Lifelong Learning Office. See information below on applying:

  24. UNC-Chapel Hill in top 5 of The Princeton Review's best value colleges

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is ranked No. 4 in The Princeton Review's annual list of best public universities for value. The college admissions service company considered several factors in compiling its list of 209 best-value schools, including academics, costs, financial aid, debt, graduation rates and alumni career and ...

  25. DOCX [Course Title]

    By attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, you agree to abide by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill policies related to the acceptable use of IT systems and services. The Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) sets the expectation that you will use the University's technology resources responsibly, consistent with the ...

  26. Secretly recording a professor at UNC? That's underhanded and ...

    It may soon become unbearable to teach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I fear that day has already arrived, though desperately hope I am wrong. The latest disturbing news is ...

  27. PDF UNC

    City: Chapel Hill State: North Carolina Zip: 27599-2200 Country: United States Admissions Phone Number: 919-962-2211 Admissions Toll-free Number: Admissions Website: https://admissions.unc.edu/apply/ Admissions Email Address: [email protected] Is there a separate URL for your school's online application? If yes, please specify:

  28. PDF CHANCELLOR LEADERSHIP PROFILE

    THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 5 2 Nobel Laureates (2015, 2017) KEY FACTS ABOUT CAROLINA 4,234 Full- and part-time faculty 44% Tenured or tenure- track faculty 32,234 Undergraduate, graduate and professional students 9,704 Staff members Faculty and Staff 17.8% First-generation undergraduates 54 Rhodes Scholars since 1902 85.4%

  29. PDF Econ 420

    UNC-Chapel Hill is strongly committed to addressing the mental health needs of a diverse student body. The Heels Care Network website is a place to access the many mental health resources at Carolina. CAPS is the primary mental health provider for students, offering timely access to consultation and connection to clinically appropriate services.