how to list things in an essay

How To List Things in an Essay (APA and MLA)

Essays usually follow a consistent format but every now and then something happens to throw that pattern off. Lists may be required in essays, which might throw off the piece’s general formatting, organization, and syntax. Let us go through how to list things in an essay.

When adding a list of subtopics or themes, lists of recommendations, phases of analysis, components of an item, and the like, readers often get your point fast. The key to using lists in an essay is to employ proper punctuation and grammar, as well as to maintain a consistent grammatical style.

Anything less than 3 items should not be listed in your essay.

Lists frequently appear in essays, posing problems for formatting, paragraph structure, and grammar. When you include:

  • subtopics or themes
  • evaluation checklists
  • complex lists of ideas
  • steps in project planning
  • component pieces of an item

With lists, readers immediately grasp your message. Punctuation and parallelism in grammar are some of the important tools for creating lists in essays. Here is how to list things in an essay.

Ways to List Things in Your Essay

1. listing with bullets.

Bulleted lists aid in the organization of texts and project ideas by eliminating the necessity for a chronological order of events or concepts. Maintain a consistent listing style throughout. Following the bullet style, statements should begin with capital letters and end with simply the correct punctuation. Bulleted lists aren’t the best format for listings in chronological order.

The APA lists are quite effective at establishing concepts, and they are organized in a variety of ways based on the type of information conveyed.

Find the most effective technique of establishing the facts about your subject matter after reviewing your work and confirming that your professors do not prohibit bullet points.

Consider whether an MLA numbered list or any other APA list would showcase your content more effectively. Find a technique to list things in an essay, specifically the MLA numbered list, when the specific points of your topic require a specific order in which they must be given.

Bullets are a good option in research papers.

If there isn’t a specific chronological order, a bulleted list is another option for listing items in an essay.

Lists that aren’t too long should be organized as separate paragraphs or under their titled sections rather than as vertical lists. However, for extremely thorough information, the bulleted list is still the best alternative.

Bullet points should be indented at least one inch from the left margin, which is a standard recognized formatting style. Lists with double spaces and precise quotations from their sources are more efficient.

Create a brief topic sentence that explains your motives just as soon as you’re about to introducing a sentence, and then include all those items in your list in an orderly manner that pertains to that statement.

When Do You Use Bullet Lists?

Exercise some restraint when employing bullet points in your academic writing assignments. The last thing you want your essay to look like is a smallpox sore.  Many of the circumstances and ways in which you might use bullet points in your article include the following:

  • Significant emphases on interpretation
  • In the case of listings
  • Clarification of step-by-step instructions
  • Formulating recipes and component lists.
  • When you want to condense descriptions
  • To provide evidence to support your essay points
  • When making use of illustrations

When Bullet Points are not allowed

Watch closely for patterns in how frequently you employ them. The bullet points should not take up more than a quarter of the total space on your page.

However, there are some instances in which using bullet points in an academic composition is a strict no-no. Here are some examples of such situations:

  • When writing your thesis statement.
  • When writing a conclusion in your paper.
  • Within the context of a detailed illustration.
  • In the case of quotations.
  • Within the first paragraph of the introduction.

2. Listing with Numbers

For numbered lists, they’re ideal for describing a series of events or a logical arrangement of thoughts. When writing an APA format list, the standard format is to start with numerals and end with a full stop. The next logical step is to begin your listed item with a capital letter after the period has been removed.

In their papers, psychologists and experts in the social sciences use the APA style. These APA lists are quite effective at establishing concepts, and they are organized in a variety of ways based on the type of information conveyed.

Using colons and bracketed numbers

There are numerous methods for enumerating things such as statements. The first of these ways involves writing the number in parentheses: Here’s an illustration:

Dinosaurs lived 4 million years ago: (1) first evidence to support, (2) second evidence, and (3) third evidence written here. 

It’s important to pay attention to the numbers inside the parenthesis, and it’s not a good idea to utilize only one bracket once the number has been written. If the introduction of your supporting claim is an incomplete sentence, do not begin the list with a colon. You could try the following:

Here are the pieces of evidence: (1) the first evidence, (2) the second evidence, and (3) the third proof.

Using semi colons and bracketed numbers

If one of your pieces of evidence also has a comma in the middle, use semicolons to separate the elements. Changing it from a run-in text to a vertical list is the easiest method to get around this.

Naming the numbers

Here, instead of writing 1, 2, 3, 4, and so on, you will use first, second, third, fourth, and so on.

This other way to list data include separates statements using the serial versions of the numerals.

For instance.

The following are the arguments to support it. First (insert evidence). Second (here is the evidence). Third, here is the evidence. 

It is not a good practice to use semicolons to join all the pieces into one big claim since itemizing facts into one phrase necessitates the use of parentheses.

3. Lists with Letters

In this case, semicolons are utilized to properly divide APA-styled lists. They often use (a) lowercase letters; (b) within parentheses; and (c) semicolons to divide their sentences.

They often use (a) lowercase letters; (b) within parentheses; and (c) semicolons to divide their sentences. You should get the idea from there.

4. Running Text Lists

To identify elements in a list, Oxford commas are employed in run-in-texts. It’s known as the serial comma, and it comes before the conjunction. The main ingredients for recipe ABC are tomatoes, chilies, onions, and cilantro.

5. The First Sentence of the Introduction

When you create a numbered or unnumbered list in conjunction with a thesis statement or the introduction sentence, you have the option of either concluding the list or leaving it incomplete. It all depends on the structure of the essay and the methods used to list items. The colon should only be used with statements that have been completed.

A good example would be: “When making the perfect cup of coffee, you would usually need the following ingredients:”

Other than that approach, you could write “For the best cup of coffee, ensure that you” — think this approach only if every item on the list could self-sufficiently conclude a sentence that began with this structure.

6. Listing Single Items

Sometimes, what you need to list come as a complete statement, then each list item can be a single word, an expression, or a complete sentence, depending on the situation. The only requirement is that you adhere to a consistent pattern throughout the list. If you find yourself in this circumstance, write it in all capital letters and only use the full stop for complete statements.

7. Punctuation

Only statements and phrases that help to bring the structure to completion should be used when it is still unfinished. There should be a period at the end of each of them. Never use commas or semicolons, and avoid appending items from the second to the final one in a list unless necessary.

8. Deciding on a List

Ensure that your plans for really using that structure are expressed in that manner prior to deciding on a list format. For short itineraries with only a few things to say about each of them, it is ideal to utilize them as a statement in the run-in text. It is necessary to utilize a semicolon in order to neatly arrange the elements that will be listed within the sentence after the colon.

In contrast to our first case, lengthy statements that are to be incorporated into lists are difficult to deal with when they are presented as statements alone. In this case, the things should be separated into separate paragraphs or mentioned within a single lengthy paragraph, depending on their importance. It is best to break up long sentences inside a paragraph into separate paragraphs and number them in an essay. It is also best to bullet point or title them in an essay.

9. Separators

The usage of dividers such as “2)” or “(b)” in lists created with run-in-text should only be done when absolutely essential. The language and punctuation, in other words, fall short of the purpose of distinguishing the items on a list. Furthermore, despite this, you might want to think about doing a second rewrite to alleviate the complication and improve the overall comprehension of the section.

Using roman numerals and lowercase letters alternately, create simple outlines with a number of levels of difficulty. This method of defining your work and identifying each item in a list is the most effective technique to use multilevel lists. You should follow this order:

  • Roman numbers
  • Capitalized letters
  • Arabic numbers
  • Lowercase letters
  • An Arabic numeral marked by parentheses or placed within brackets is a type of numeric expression.
  • Lowercase letters, mainly denoted by parenthesis or put within brackets.

How to List Things in an Essay APA Style

Always make sure that all of the items on a list are syntactically and conceptually equivalent. For example, all of the items could be nouns, or all of the items could be phrases that begin with the word “and.” In the vast majority of cases, lists are simple lists in which commas (or semicolons in the case of lists in which items contain commas) are used between items, including immediately before the final item (see more information and examples on the lettered lists page). The use of lettered lists, numbered lists, and bulleted lists are all permitted in APA Style in order to draw additional attention to specific items.

Bulleted and numbered lists are permitted by the APA Style rules; however, if you’re unsure whether or not your instructor will allow them in your assignment, you should check with your instructor before submitting your work. See the section below for information on how to format lists.

Bulleted lists in the APA format

Depending on how the sentence is structured, the capitalization and punctuation for each bulleted item will differ. The first letter of the first word in the bulleted text should be capitalized, and the paragraph should be terminated by placing a period after the last bullet (see “Lists, Part 5: Bulleted Lists” in the APA Style Blog). As an illustration:

  • This is a complete sentence.
  • This is an additional sentence.

This is the final sentence of the bulleted list.

The bulleted list that separates three or more elements within a sentence is “capitalized and punctuated as if it were a complete sentence,” according to the style guide (American Psychological Association, 2010, p. 64).

APA 7th Edition

Bulleted and numbered lists are allowed by the APA Style rules, but if you’re unsure whether or not your instructor will allow them in your assignment, you should check with your instructor before submitting your work. Always keep in mind that, because bulleted or numbered items only provide undetailed information and do not include analysis, and because the goal of formal academic writing is to showcase your analytical thinking, these lists should be used sparingly in favor of conveying your ideas in full sentences and paragraphs. See the section below for information on how to format lists.

Lists with bullets

The capitalization and punctuation used for each bulleted item is determined by whether the items are complete sentences or sentence parts in the paragraph below. It is acceptable to capitalize the first letter of the very first word and to end the paragraph with a period in case the bulleted text is a complete sentence.

How to Make a List in MLA Format

Vertical lists are uncommon in essays written in humanities departments around the world, and they are most often used as run-in text within a sentence, with a colon marking the beginning of the list.

As an illustration, “Mark Twain has written five books: The Adventures of Mississippi, The Prince and the Tramp, A Tramp At Home, Life on the Finn, and My Early Life”.

The colon, on that note, is not used before a list when the list if those items are the object of the verb that announces them.

For instance, “Mark Twain’s recently published books include The Adventures of Mississippi, The Prince and the Tramp, A Tramp At Home, Life on the Finn, My Early Life.”

Although it is possible to include numbered lists in an MLA essay, it is recommended that you avoid doing so as much as possible. The use of lists in your essay can be accomplished in a variety of ways, so you should inquire about your professor’s preferences before proceeding.

do essay use bullet points

  • Master Your Homework
  • Do My Homework

Bullet Point Your Research Paper: A How-To Guide

As the demand for college and university-level research papers grows, so too does the need for effective strategies to help students break down their written work into manageable pieces. One approach that is gaining traction among instructors and tutors alike is bullet point organization of a research paper. This method allows students to present information more concisely while still conveying enough detail in order to effectively support any argument or position they are trying to make. In this article, we will provide an overview of what bullet pointing involves and how it can be used as part of successful paper composition. We will also provide tips on making sure points are chosen wisely when constructing your essay structure with bullets, along with some useful techniques for enhancing readability through proper formatting conventions such as font size and spacing guidelines. Finally, we’ll offer advice on troubleshooting common issues related to presenting one’s writing using this style so that you can confidently submit papers which have been organized clearly via bulleted lists – no matter what assignment or academic setting you find yourself in!

1. Introduction to Bullet Pointing Research Papers

2. benefits of bullet pointing in writing processes, 3. strategies for effective bulletin point creation, 4. examples of well-formatted and cohesive bulleted points, 5. pitfalls to avoid when structuring bullets in a paper, 6. tips for paragraph development after listing points, 7. conclusion: utilizing bullets as an organizational tool.

Unleashing the Power of Bullet Points in Research Papers

Bullet points have become indispensable tools for expressing ideas and structuring content. With their succinct format, they can quickly summarize key concepts or arguments within research papers. While some academics regard bullet pointing as an oversimplification of complex material, when used effectively, it’s a powerful way to organize information into bite-sized chunks that are easier to digest.

At its core, the purpose of bullet point research is to provide clarity and facilitate understanding among readers by breaking up long texts with shorter points. They also help guide readers through different sections so they don’t get lost in meandering explanations and convoluted syntaxes – something which could easily be avoided with judicious use of bullets! So yes – can research papers have bullet points? . Absolutely! Not only do they make your paper look more organized but also communicate your thoughts better than sentences alone ever could.

Organization and Presentation of Ideas Bullet pointing is an effective writing tool for organizing ideas, which can help writers present complex information in a digestible manner. The structure allows readers to quickly skim over the text while still grasping important points without getting lost in details. This makes bullet-pointed paragraphs ideal when summarizing facts or providing quick overviews.

Moreover, bullets allow writers to connect pieces of information that might not have been otherwise related into categories, making them easier for readers to remember and absorb. Not only does this make it simpler to track concepts within texts but also highlights the most salient aspects of any given topic allowing readers to concentrate on more significant elements instead of wasting time with trivial details.

In terms of academic papers, researchers are often advised against using lists unless absolutely necessary due to their informal nature; however, there are instances where including some form bullets may improve readability such as when presenting survey results or numerical data. When used judiciously they can be beneficial by creating visual breaks between sections helping organize large chunks of content into manageable bitesize segments – something particularly useful during long-form assignments like dissertations or research papers.

Prioritize Points

Creating effective bullet points begins with prioritizing the most essential information. All topics should be given due consideration and weighted against each other. What is more important to emphasize in a research paper? Picking out key talking points can help readers understand the material quickly and easily, without overwhelming them with too much detail.

Organization is critical for creating memorable bullets that make an impression on viewers. Clarity must come first before aesthetic considerations are made about font type or size, as well as images or multimedia elements placed alongside them. It’s also worth considering if all parts of a topic will need bullet points or if some ideas can be explained further through text-based explanation; either way it’s important not to clutter up the page with too many bullets at once.

Balance Detail & Brevity

  • Research papers often contain dry facts and technical language – but do these really have to appear in their plainest form within bullet lists?
  • It helps to think of each point as having its own personality which comes from being able to capture complex ideas into concise words.

By using creative phrasing while still preserving meaning, content creators can craft captivating yet informative writing – especially when done right this provides an engaging entrypoint into understanding any subject matter no matter how complicated it may seem initially.

Bulleted points are a great way to add organization and structure to any type of document. They can be used in research papers, newsletters, brochures, webpages and other documents as they provide readers with an easy-to-read format that breaks down complex information into smaller chunks. When using bulleted points it is important to ensure that the content within each point is cohesive and well formatted for maximum impact.

Using Cohesive Points: To create effective bullet points it’s important that all of the items listed have some sort of common thread running through them so the reader doesn’t feel confused or overwhelmed by having too much unconnected material presented at once. For example if you were writing about different types of chocolate chip cookies then each point should contain relevant details like ingredients used, baking time required etc., rather than unrelated facts such as calorie counts or serving suggestions which could confuse readers who weren’t expecting these sorts of details included in your list.

  • Chocolate Chip Cookies – 1/2 cup butter; 2/3 cup sugar; 1 egg…

Formatting Your Content: Additionally when creating bullet points make sure everything looks neat by formatting correctly including capitalizing words where appropriate, adding punctuation marks after each item on the list and not making individual entries run over multiple lines – unless absolutely necessary due to word count restrictions.

For instance instead of saying “chocolate chip cookie recipe contains Butter Sugar Egg Vanilla Extract Flour Baking Soda Salt” you’d want to write out something like this.

  • “Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe – Contains : Butter , Sugar , Egg , Vanilla Extract , Flour , Baking Soda & Salt .”

. This makes your work appear more professional while also helping break up difficult concepts into easier pieces for better understanding!

In conclusion yes research papers can include bulleted lists but bear in mind both cohesion among points as well as proper formatting rules must be adhered too for best results.

When structuring bullets within an academic paper, there are certain pitfalls that should be avoided for the most effective communication of ideas and research outcomes. The following tips will help you keep your writing clear and concise while also avoiding common errors.

The first mistake to avoid is using too many bullet points – this can quickly make the text seem cluttered or disorganized. It’s important to use bullet points judiciously; often, two or three well-structured sentences may convey more information than a lengthy list of bullets would. Additionally, it’s worth noting that while some instructors allow them in their papers, not all do – so it pays to check with yours before including any! Lastly, avoid treating each bullet as if its own individual paragraph – instead think of them as subheadings which organize long blocks of copy into manageable sections.

  • For example:

Bullets can add structure when discussing complex topics by breaking down long texts into shorter parts – but they shouldn’t be overused and should always fit logically into the overall narrative arc being created by your paper. Can Research Papers Have Bullet Points? Yes – provided that they follow specific formatting guidelines such as keeping bullets relatively brief (three lines maximum)and only using relevant information pertaining directly to your topic at hand. If used correctly, then yes–research papers can certainly benefit from organized lists!

Developing the Paragraphs: Once the points are listed, it’s important to build on them and develop each idea within a paragraph. This is done by linking the information from one point with that of another in order to create sentences which flow naturally together. The transition words used should be relevant and help keep readers engaged in reading further. Additionally, providing supportive details for every argument presented is essential; this can include quotes from reliable sources or statistics related to an issue discussed in the paper.

Another helpful strategy when developing paragraphs after listing points is using bullet points if they fit better than plain text – some research papers may benefit from having clearly outlined ideas more so than lengthy descriptive passages. Be sure to use consistent font sizes for any bullets as well as indentation spacing between them – these will make key concepts easier for readers to comprehend quickly without disrupting their overall understanding of your paper’s main arguments.

Bullet Points: Streamlining Content for Improved Comprehension

The utilization of bullet points is an effective tool when it comes to presenting data and information in a more organized manner. It helps keep track of the various topics being discussed, as well as guiding readers through essential facts and conclusions easily. Bullets are especially useful in research papers where there is often too much detail included that could otherwise be overwhelming for readers to digest all at once. In addition, they allow researchers to present their findings succinctly without having to sacrifice clarity or context.

By utilizing bullets, authors can make sure their paper stands out from others by providing a clear structure and concise style that makes the content easier on the eyes while still retaining its value. Furthermore, this organization technique enables them to organize sections into subsections more effectively – something which may not always be possible with paragraphs alone since many times these tend towards lengthy digressions rather than straightforward statements of fact.

Can research papers have bullet points? Absolutely! Bullet points should never replace full sentences nor do away with important explanations or arguments but they can certainly supplement written text by helping convey complex ideas quickly and efficiently – something particularly valuable when dealing with long academic essays like those typically found in peer-reviewed publications!

English: This guide to bullet point research paper writing has provided an in-depth examination of the structure and organization that can make this process easier. By following these steps, writers will be able to produce concise yet effective papers with a well-crafted flow and thoughtful presentation of information. Furthermore, they may even find themselves inspired by the creative ways in which bullet points allow them to present their ideas. For those seeking further assistance with formatting or general academic writing skills, additional resources are available for consultation.

Banner

Essay writing

  • Introduction

Answering the question

Generating ideas, planning your essay, different planning methods.

  • Writing your essay
  • Developing your essay writing

Useful links for writing essays

  • Study Advice Helping students to achieve study success with guides, video tutorials, seminars and one-to-one advice sessions.
  • Academic writing LibGuide Expert guidance on punctuation, grammar, writing style and proof-reading.
  • Guide to citing references Includes guidance on why, when and how to use references correctly in your academic writing.
  • Reading and notemaking LibGuide Expert guidance on managing your reading and making effective notes.
  • Academic Phrasebank Use this site for examples of linking phrases and ways to refer to sources.
  • Ten stages of assignment success (Prezi) Based upon Burns and Sinfield, Essential Study Skills.
  • Critical Thinking A short video on Critical Thinking that the BBC have prepared in partnership with The Open University

The first thing to do when preparing to write an essay is to make a plan. You could just rush in and write everything that comes into your head, but that would make it difficult for your marker to read and would reduce the effectiveness of your ideas. These will make much stronger arguments if you group them together than they would do on their own.

The guidance on this page will show you how to plan and structure your essay to produce a strong and focused response to the question.

A very common complaint from lecturers and examiners is that students write a lot of information but they just don't answer the question. Don't rush straight into researching – give yourself time to think carefully about the question and understand what it is asking.

do essay use bullet points

Underlining key words – This is a good start point for making sure you understand all the terms (some might need defining); identifying the crucial information in the question; and clarifying what the question is asking you to do (compare & contrast, analyse, discuss). But make sure you then consider the question as a whole again, not just as a series of unconnected words.

Re-read the question – Read the question through a few times. Explain it to yourself, so you are sure you know what it is asking you to do.

Try breaking the question down into sub-questions – What is the question asking? Why is this important? How am I going to answer it? What do I need to find out first, second, third in order to answer the question? This is a good way of working out what important points or issues make up the overall question – it can help focus your reading and start giving your essay a structure. However, try not to have too many sub-questions as this can lead to following up minor issues, as opposed to the most important points.

  • Answering the question and planning (video) Watch this brief video tutorial for more on the topic.
  • Answering the question and planning (transcript) Read along while watching the video tutorial.

do essay use bullet points

The kinds of things to note briefly are:

  • What you already know about the topic – from lectures, seminars, general knowledge.
  • Things you don't know about the topic, but need to find out in order to answer the question.
  • Initial responses or answers to the question – what you think your conclusion might possibly be.

This helps you start formulating your argument and direction for answering the question. It also helps you focus your reading, as you can pinpoint what you need to find out and go straight to the parts of books, chapters, articles that will be most relevant.

After reading - After your reading, it is often good to summarise all your findings on a page. Again, a spider diagram can help with this.

Bringing together the key points from your reading helps clarify what you have found out, and helps you find a pathway through all the ideas and issues you have encountered. If you include brief details of authors and page nos. for key information, it can act as a quick at-a-glance guide for finding the evidence you need to support your points later.

It also helps you see how your initial response to the question might have changed or become more sophisticated in light of the reading you've done. It leads into planning your essay structure.

do essay use bullet points

  • It enables you to work out a logical structure and an end point for your argument before you start writing.
  • It means you don't have to do this type of complex thinking at the same time as trying to find the right words to express your ideas.
  • It helps you to commit yourself to sticking to the point!

You need to work out what to include, and what can be left out. It is impossible to cover everything in an essay, and your markers will be looking for evidence of your ability to choose material and put it in order. Brainstorm all your ideas, then arrange them in three or four groups. Not everything will fit so be prepared to discard some points (you can mention them briefly in your introduction).

Outline what you are going to include in each section:

  • Introduction : Address the question, show why it's interesting and how you will answer it.
  • Main body : Build your argument. Put your groups of ideas in a sequence to make a persuasive argument. One main point in each paragraph.
  • Conclusion : Summarise your arguments and evidence, and show how they answer the original question.

Writing a summary - Some people plan best once they have written something, as this helps clarify their thinking. If you prefer to write first, try summarising the central idea of your essay in a few sentences. This gives you a clear direction for working out how you are going to break it down into points supported by evidence. You can then use one of the methods below to write a more detailed plan.

  • Structuring your essay (video) Watch this brief video tutorial for more on the topic.
  • Structuring your essay (transcript) Read along while watching the video tutorial.

do essay use bullet points

Bullet points / linear plans - This type of plan lists the main points using bullet points or numbers. It can be a brief outline of the main point per paragraph, or a more detailed plan with sub-points and a note of the evidence to support each point (e.g. source and page no.).

No plan is perfect, so be prepared for your ideas to change as you write your essay. However, once you have an initial plan it is much easier to adapt it and see where new things fit if your thinking does change.

  • << Previous: Home
  • Next: Writing your essay >>
  • Last Updated: Apr 30, 2024 10:21 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.reading.ac.uk/essays

Sie verwenden einen veralteten Internet-Browser. Bitte laden Sie sich eine aktuelle Version von browsehappy.com um die Seite fehlerfrei zu verwenden.

You're here: textbroker.com » Blog » For authors » Punctuation » When To Use Bullet Points In Your Writing

When To Use Bullet Points In Your Writing

Bullet points are a crucial tool for writers. These points provide clarity and focus for readers, quickly highlighting important topics.

Learn the basics on when to use bullet points

As writers, we all agree that when you write copy for online viewership, it is different.  You have to persuade and honestly explain the goals of what you are writing in a better way.  Nothing helps this more than an understanding of when to use bullet points.

Our society has become a nation of skimmers and not deep readers.  This means, as writers, we must grab your attention and grab it quickly.  

As a content creator, what is the best way to handle this?  I could argue a point for making my content shorter , but I know that longer pieces often get better engagement .  Great content requires excellent substance, so that should be the goal.  Writing articles is about grabbing the reader’s attention, which needs me to focus on current trends .  In the world of copy, one of the most essential tools is the small but powerful bullet point.  

do essay use bullet points

Join Textbroker Today and Discover the Joy of Writing!

Register for Free!

When to use Bullet Points? 

When I think of the bullet point, I think of getting right to the topic.  I then have to explain the subject (or subject) precisely and honestly.  The author has to deliver instant gratification, or the intention of using the bullet point(s) has not been fruitful.

Using bullet points is a simple but powerful way to present a list of facts, statistics, or even traits of a subject.  You can even use bullet points to give instructions that sometimes do not need to be on a numbered list but instead, just get noted quickly.

Often bullet points are overutilized, so keep in mind your article structure to create the best formatting.  The goal is to enhance the article, not overwhelm the reader with lists.

Let’s discuss how to use bullet points:

  • Remember to include a colon at the end of the text when introducing a bullet point section.
  • Use the same font and margin width at each point.
  • Ensure all the items in the list are related.
  • Proper structure is still important.  If you’re creating sentences, capitalize the sentence and end with the appropriate punctuation.
  • Bullet points can be words, phrases, or sentences.
  • Important – always try to keep your bullet points as short as possible.

While there are best practices for using bullet points, remember that there is still flexibility based on your topic and article structure.  As an author, remain consistent and stick to an outline that works for you and your skills.  Make your copy easy to read with a visually appealing format.

Join Our Talented Team of Writers Today

Why do authors use bullet points? 

There are many reasons why writers use bullet points.  Almost always, they fall into one of the following categories.

Summarization 

As mentioned, writing today is entirely different than a decade ago.  Trying to keep a reader’s attention sometimes means summarizing an issue.  This is where bullet points come can be extremely useful.

Expression of Major Points or Issues 

They can make a list of issues appear more professional.  If this leads to a better understanding by the reader, then you have done your job with your writing.

Item Lists 

Without a doubt, they can be used as a simple way to display a list of items.  

Give Directions 

They can help organize directions. 

Embark on Your Freelance Writing Journey with Textbroker – Join Now!

Knowing when to use bullet points is a great way to emphasize important aspects of your article.  As mentioned, don’t overuse and assess the structure of your paper.  Also, consider your audience , and how they will read and comprehend your writing.  If used correctly, bullet points can and will help your audience understand the key points of your content.

Feel free to contact us for any questions or concerns – Our team is always available to assist you!

Bullet Point FAQs 

What are the rules for a bullet points list? 

The items of a bulleted list must be short. Avoid bulleted items that are longer than two lines. If you need longer items, put them in the running text. Bulleted items should not repeat parts of the introductory sentence. 

When should you not use bullet points? 

Inappropriate use of bullet points arises when writers attempt to present an argument in list form. Bullet points alone are insufficient to constitute an argument. While bullet points can be helpful for complex ideas, they can also result in disjointed points. As such, connecting the pieces and ensuring the argument flows logically is crucial.

  • August 15, 2022
  • July 08, 2023
  • randypalmer
  • Blog, For authors, Punctuation, Professionalism, Grammar, Style

Managed-Service

Textbroker offers an extended level of service with the Managed Service option. Managed Service gives you additional support and a personal account manager when you want us to manage your projects for you. Find out more here.

Self-Service

Do you need up-to-date content? Then manage your project through Textbroker’s Self-Service. You choose the quality level, price, and author for your content.

Thousands of authors from across the U.S. earn money with Textbroker, the leading provider of unique, custom content. Become a Textbroker author now and access thousands of projects to choose from.

  • BR (Português)
  • DE (Deutsch)
  • ES (Español)
  • FR (Français)
  • IT (Italiano)
  • NL (Nederlands)
  • PL (Polski)
  • PT (Português)
  • UK (English)
  • US (English)
  • Link to facebook
  • Link to linkedin
  • Link to twitter
  • Link to youtube
  • Writing Tips

How to Punctuate Bullet Points Correctly

How to Punctuate Bullet Points Correctly

4-minute read

  • 20th January 2023

Bullet points are wonderful. They can help with concision, getting points across, and the organization of your text. However, poorly punctuated and formatted bullet point lists can have the opposite effect.

Punctuating bullet points correctly is something that often comes up in workplaces, academia, and beyond, and there’s a lot of conflicting information out there that has caused confusion.

So, in this blog post, we’re telling you everything you need to know, including what bullet points are, the basic rules of formatting them, how to punctuate them, mistakes to avoid, and tips for consistency and clarity.

What Are Bullet Points and How Are They Used?

Bullet points are used to format a list, with each list item being preceded by a bullet point (•). Here’s an example:

Things to do before the baby comes: ●  I need to paint the nursery. ●  John needs to assemble the cot. ●  I need to buy and fit a car seat. ●  We need to pick a name. ●  I’ll want to read some baby books.

Bullet points can be used to structure any list and are usually used to break up long blocks of text, highlight key points, or summarize text.

How to Punctuate Bullet Points

The first thing to do is check whether your style guide has anything to say about punctuating bullet points. If it does, then follow its instructions.

If no guidance has been provided, here is a commonly used and logical method of punctuating bullet points. The important thing is consistency; once you have settled on an approach, stick to it!

Capitalize the first letter of the first word of each bullet point, putting the remainder in sentence case (i.e., as if you were writing a normal sentence).

Next, decide whether to use punctuation at the end of each bullet point item.

Do use punctuation at the end:

Find this useful?

Subscribe to our newsletter and get writing tips from our editors straight to your inbox.

  • If your bullet point list is made up of full sentences.
  • If your list item is phrased as a question.

Here, the punctuation could be a period (.), a question mark (?), or an exclamation point (!). Whichever you choose will depend on your item and what you’re trying to convey.

Apart from the last bullet, don’t use punctuation at the end:

  • If your list
  • Short sentence fragments

Note that it is common to still capitalize the first word in the bullet (although style guides may vary).

Using these rules, we could rephrase the bullet point list mentioned above to avoid using punctuation:

Things to do before the baby comes: ●  Paint the nursery ●  Assemble the cot ●  Buy and fit a car seat ●  Pick a name ●  Read the baby books.

Common Issues to Avoid When Punctuating Bullet Points

If you can, avoid using full sentences and sentence fragments interchangeably, as it can make your lists challenging to read and looks messy on the page. If you do need to use a mixture, common practice is to treat the punctuation as if each bullet is a full sentence (i.e., to include punctuation at the end).

Consider how you want to punctuate sub-bullets, as this can be a bit of a minefield. The most straightforward way is to follow the approach given above (although some guides may recommend that you end sub-bullets with semi-colons and “and,”, as in a list). You can introduce the sub bullet with a colon.

Sub bullet points should be formatted with different styling and further indented alignment.

Tips For Consistency

As mentioned above, consistency is crucial. Erratic formatting and punctuation can look like an error, even if the inconsistency is technically correct in isolation.

For example, if you make the stylistic choice not to include punctuation at the end of your bullet points, but then use punctuation in a different list in the same document, it will look like you’ve made a proofreading mistake.

So, regardless of how you choose to lay out your bullet points, ensure that the formatting is consistent. To ensure absolute consistency, if your style guide doesn’t cover this issue already, we advise that you use and expand on the approach we have given above. These simple steps will help you use bullet points effectively to organize and highlight important information in your writing. If you need further support with formatting bullet points, our team of experts is ready to help and will proofread your first 500 words for free!

Share this article:

Post A New Comment

Got content that needs a quick turnaround? Let us polish your work. Explore our editorial business services.

3-minute read

How to Insert a Text Box in a Google Doc

Google Docs is a powerful collaborative tool, and mastering its features can significantly enhance your...

2-minute read

How to Cite the CDC in APA

If you’re writing about health issues, you might need to reference the Centers for Disease...

5-minute read

Six Product Description Generator Tools for Your Product Copy

Introduction If you’re involved with ecommerce, you’re likely familiar with the often painstaking process of...

What Is a Content Editor?

Are you interested in learning more about the role of a content editor and the...

The Benefits of Using an Online Proofreading Service

Proofreading is important to ensure your writing is clear and concise for your readers. Whether...

6 Online AI Presentation Maker Tools

Creating presentations can be time-consuming and frustrating. Trying to construct a visually appealing and informative...

Logo Harvard University

Make sure your writing is the best it can be with our expert English proofreading and editing.

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to footer

Clearly Scientific

Clearly Scientific

High-impact scientific copywriting & professional document design

Best practice for writing and formatting bulleted lists

November 20, 2022 by David Barden

Using bulleted lists

Bulleted lists are great for breaking up long lists into manageable chunks and for making your copy easier to scan. But are you getting the most out of this useful format? Follow these 12 tips for writing and formatting bulleted lists, and your key points are guaranteed to come across more strongly.

Take your time over bulleted lists

When presenting a set of related ideas, categories, features or benefits, the bulleted list is a winner on several levels. Not only is a bulleted list more visually appealing than a solid wall of text, but it helps the reader by breaking a complex chunk of information down into simpler elements.

But although writing out a bulleted list might seem like a quick job, doing it well requires considerable thought. To help you ensure that your next one works well, I’d like to share this checklist of best-practices for writing and formatting bulleted lists in your copy.

Thinking about writing a bulleted list

#1: Avoid more than seven items in a bulleted list

The first point is a structural one – don’t list too many things at once. A long bulleted list is certainly better than the same information presented as a solid paragraph, but the more items there are, the less engaging the list is, and the less likely it is that the reader will spot the points that interest them.

So keep your bulleted list to a maximum of about seven entries, and if it’s more, ask yourself, are all of those points really necessary? And if they are, would splitting up the list under separate headers make the individual entries easier to find?

#2: Use bullet-points with visual impact

Round solid bullet-points are the default option for many, but it’s worth trying other symbols if they’re available ( see below ). I quite like the filled square, the right-hand arrowhead, and the right-hand French angular quotation mark, while the check-mark is familiar in lists of benefits or included features. You could even go for custom bullet-points that mirror your brand, so long as they’re not too elaborate.

Good general-purpose bullet-point symbols

Make sure the size is appropriate too – symbols that are too large can look clunky and amateurish, whereas symbols that are too small will lack impact.

#3: Avoid sub-bullets

Word-processing packages typically offer tempting options for formatting bulleted lists at multiple levels, but in practice you should only use them when you absolutely have to. The more complex your bulleted list, the less understandable it will be at first glance.

However, if you do decide to go down this route, I’d recommend using a different symbol with a reduced weighting or size, such as the en-dash, the right-hand angle-bracket, or the open circle (see below). This prevents them distracting attention away from the top-level entries.

Good symbols for sub-bullets (if needed)

#4: Pick a strong colour

Having your bullet-points the same colour as the body text is the norm, but in a piece of company literature, using the brand colour for the bullet-point symbols gives a more professional touch.

Many brands have complementary colours, and if this is sufficiently strong, then it can help draw attention to the bulleted list without causing a colour clash.

#5: Adjust the indents and spacing carefully

Indents are normally handled well enough using the default settings for bulleted lists, so there’s no excuse for badly indented text or inconsistent alignment. I like to indent the bullet-points themselves by a few points compared to the body copy, as this is more visually pleasing.

Sub-bullets should be indented further in, and it’s worth experimenting with the settings so that you achieve a satisfactory alignment that doesn’t distract the reader.

Also ensure that the paragraph space between separate bulleted items is sufficient to avoid a text pile-up. If the entries themselves are short, a spacing that is a bit less than the regular paragraph spacing helps to keep the list looking coherent.

Best practice for formatting a bulleted list

#6: Keep the text as short as possible

Moving on to the text itself, and the impact of bullet-points is greatly reduced if each bulleted item drags on for several lines. I’d recommend a maximum of four lines of text per item, and preferably just one or two.

Also, try and keep each bulleted item about the same length – switching from short text to long text is distracting, and may give a misleading impression of the importance of the entries.

#7: Use lead-ins for longer entries

If the text of your bulleted items is relatively complex, and you can’t reduce the word-count, then a good tactic is the lead-in . This is a few words formatted in bold at the start of each item, usually followed by a colon, full-stop or en-dash (scroll down to see the example in the graphic below). You will, however, need to phrase the lead-ins carefully so that the reader doesn’t lose track of what you’re saying.

#8: Use a consistent text structure

Speaking of phrasing, a vital aspect of bullet-points (in my opinion) is parallelism . This is writing the text so that each bulleted item starts with the same part of speech (e.g. verb, adjective, noun, adverb), and ideally uses the same sentence structure. Following this rule lends emphasis to what you’re saying, makes it easier to scan, and avoids mismatched phrasing between the introduction to the bulleted list and the list itself.

Start each bulleted item with the same part of speech to make your bulleted list easier to scan

#9: Use punctuation consistently

There are various styles of punctuation used for bulleted lists, but one thing is clear: in running text, you should always introduce your the list with a colon (:). The semicolon (;), although widely used, is incorrect.

As for the punctuation should you use at the end of items in your bulleted list, being consistent shows off your attention to detail. There are three options:

  • Nothing: recommended for single words or short entries.
  • Full-stop: recommended for longer entries or complete sentences, and optional at the end of the last item in any list.
  • Semi-colon: archaic and best avoided, along with the “and” at the end of the penultimate item.

Ultimately, you should avoid any usage that distracts from the text – if it looks odd, then change it!

#10: Use initial capitals

Starting each bulleted item with a capital letter is recommended in nearly all instances. But where the bulleted items ‘run on’ from the body text above, then lower-case can make it clear that the sentences are intended to be read in that way. I’ve shown an example of this in tip #11.

Best practice for writing a bulleted list

#11: Use them for the right reasons

The tips above cover how to use bullet-points, but when should you use them?

I think you should consider using a bulleted list:

  • where you need to highlight a range of ideas, options, features or benefits
  • where the entire list is worthy of attention
  • where the items can be conveyed concisely
  • where the items are logically distinct
  • where listing the points in the body text would be cumbersome.

If any of these don’t apply, then check that a bulleted list really is the right way forward. If your message makes more sense as body copy, it’s probably better that way.

#12: Don’t overuse them

And one final word: because the eye is naturally drawn towards bulleted lists, using them too liberally will reduce their impact. So use them only where necessary, and where they don’t vie for attention with other elements of your copy.

Battling with bullet-points? If you need help structuring your message for easy understanding, please get in touch.

Enago Academy

How to Use Bullet Lists and Number Lists in a Research Paper

' src=

Academic articles often include lists, which organize the material and provide the reader with a quick overview of a section. There are different ways to format lists, but some general principles apply to all of them: they should be constructed in a parallel fashion, and they should be consistent. Numbers, letters, and bullet points are not required in all cases. Academic writers who use The Chicago Manual of Style will find various formats there, but four common list formats are presented here.

Types of List Formats

Run-in lists.

A run-in list, as the name suggests, is included as part of the general text. Elements can be separated in different ways, as shown in the examples below.

Separated with a Colon:   When a complete sentence is followed by a list of items, separate the sentence from the list with a colon.

E.g. “ Do not venture into the wilderness without these items: a knife, a book of matches, a flashlight, and a map. ”

Separated with Numbers:  When the list is part of the sentence, you can separate the items by numbering them.

E.g. “ The Housing Committee passed resolutions on (1) annual salaries, (2) fundraising efforts, and (3) community building. ”

Related: Need instant academic writing tips on your cell phone? Download the FREE Enago Academy mobile app now!

Vertical Lists

A vertical list should be preceded by a complete sentence that gives an overview of the points being listed. The list does not need to have a bullet point format and a punctuation mark is not at the end of the entries. For example:

Your admissions packet should include these items:

The three-page statement of purpose

The financial questionnaire

Your contact information

If the lead-in sentence is a complete one and all entries in the list are complete sentences, a punctuation mark should follow each entry. For example (using bullet points):

Make perfect banana bread every time by following these easy steps:

  • Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
  • Grease an 8 x 8 baking dish.
  • Combine all the dry ingredients (listed above).
  • Gently fold in the wet ingredients (listed above).
  • Pour the batter into the dish and bake for 45 minutes.

Again, note that because each entry in the list is a complete sentence, a final period is used.

Vertical Lists Punctuated as a Sentence

When a list is too long or convoluted to be presented as one sentence, you can use a vertical list that is punctuated like a sentence. This format is especially useful when the phrases include internal punctuations or the reader might find it difficult to follow the meaning. An example follows below.

Biology instructors have made significant changes to their curricula and classrooms, and today it is common to find

  • innovative research techniques, especially those requiring knowledge of anatomy, in labs;
  • greater focus on teamwork;
  • in-class lectures customized for learning styles; and
  • bilingual lesson plans.

Vertical Lists with Subdivided Items

A complex vertical list may be formatted in a way that resembles an outline, using numbers and letters to provide a logical structure. The lead-in (introductory) line should be a complete sentence, as seen in the example below.

Students should be prepared to discuss the following topics:

  • Regional History
  • Geography and landmarks
  • Erosion in mountainous areas
  • Notable Figures
  • The first tribal chieftains
  • The emergence of political divisions and leaders
  • The role of women
  • Cultural Developments
  • The spread of language
  • Music used to bind communities

The next time you read a research paper , look for lists and examine how they were constructed. Do the entries use a consistent format? Are the numbers and/or letters correctly placed and in the proper order? Is the lead-in line a complete sentence? If you find that these steps are all present, chances are that the author took the time to research the structure of lists and present them accurately. Now you can do the same.

References:

  • Get It Write. Handling Vertical Lists.  Retrieved from http://www.getitwriteonline.com/archive/101406VerticalLists.htm

' src=

Very helpful and precise

Rate this article Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published.

do essay use bullet points

Enago Academy's Most Popular Articles

ICMJE Update on Medical Journal Publication (January 2024)

  • Industry News
  • Trending Now

ICMJE Updates Guidelines for Medical Journal Publication, Emphasizes on Inclusivity and AI Transparency

The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recently updated its recommendations for best practices…

manuscript writing with AI

  • AI in Academia
  • Infographic
  • Manuscripts & Grants
  • Reporting Research

Can AI Tools Prepare a Research Manuscript From Scratch? — A comprehensive guide

As technology continues to advance, the question of whether artificial intelligence (AI) tools can prepare…

Best Research Methodology

  • Manuscript Preparation
  • Publishing Research

How to Choose Best Research Methodology for Your Study

Successful research conduction requires proper planning and execution. While there are multiple reasons and aspects…

CSE Style Guide

  • Journal Guidelines

How to Use CSE Style While Drafting Scientific Manuscripts

What is CSE Style Guide? CSE stands for Council of Science Editors. Originated in the…

AIP Style Guide

How to Create Publication-ready Manuscripts Using AIP Style Guide

What is AIP Style Guide? The AIP style guide refers to a specific citation format…

What Are the Unique Characteristics of the AMA Style Guide?

do essay use bullet points

Sign-up to read more

Subscribe for free to get unrestricted access to all our resources on research writing and academic publishing including:

  • 2000+ blog articles
  • 50+ Webinars
  • 10+ Expert podcasts
  • 50+ Infographics
  • 10+ Checklists
  • Research Guides

We hate spam too. We promise to protect your privacy and never spam you.

I am looking for Editing/ Proofreading services for my manuscript Tentative date of next journal submission:

do essay use bullet points

What should universities' stance be on AI tools in research and academic writing?

How do I quote bulleted or numbered points from a source?

Note: This post relates to content in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook . For up-to-date guidance, see the ninth edition of the MLA Handbook .

If you need to quote from a bulleted or numbered list, you can reproduce the list in your essay, as in the example below:

Parvini organizes the material into four groups: Early modern Christian beliefs inherited from the medieval period, indeed the very period that Shakespeare is writing about in the history plays The structure of feudal and semifeudal society Emergent humanist ideas about history and politics imported from Renaissance Italy, especially those of Niccolò Machiavelli The key events of the Wars of the Roses and the corresponding key plot points of Shakespeare’s two tetralogies. (95) Work Cited Parvini, Neema. “Historicism ‘By Stealth’: History, Politics, and Power in  Richard II  and  Henry IV. ”  Approaches to  Teaching Shakespeare’s English History Plays , edited by Laurie Ellinghausen, Modern Language Association of America, 2017, pp. 94–99.

You can also quote from each point in the list, perhaps paring down some of the information:

Parvini organizes the material as follows: “early modern Christian beliefs inherited from the medieval period,” “the structure of feudal and semifeudal society,” “emergent humanist ideas about history and politics imported from Renaissance Italy,” and “the key events of the War of the Roses and the corresponding key plot points of Shakesepare’s two tetralogies” (95).
  • Navigation Logo
  • Our mission
  • Trustee board
  • Your campus
  • Social media
  • Work for us
  • Freshers' Advertising
  • Accessibility
  • Sustainability
  • Student Life Pulse
  • Exec Guide to NTSU
  • Student-led Teaching Awards
  • Officer impacts
  • Student networks
  • Black History Month
  • City campus
  • Brackenhurst campus
  • Clifton campus
  • Deals & offers
  • Online shop
  • Lost Property
  • Society Showcase
  • Give it a go
  • Communities
  • NTSU Student Awards
  • Passions & Projects
  • Information & advice service
  • International student support

Academic support

  • Discrimination & harassment support
  • Health & wellbeing
  • Housing advice
  • Safety advice
  • Sex & sexuality
  • NTU Active membership
  • Social sports
  • Sports calendar
  • Sports exec
  • Sports committees
  • Upcoming Fixtures
  • Sports clubs A-Z
  • Freshers 2024

Essay writing tips

  • Time management tips
  • Exam prep and mindset

do essay use bullet points

Not sure how to get started with an assignment? Here are our top tips to help you avoid all-nighters.

Plan first, write later.

Plan your essay in bullet points before you start writing it. This makes it easy to have an overview of your essay and structure your argument so you know what to write. Make your points follow on from one another so your argument builds to a logical conclusion. Once you have all your points in order, then start writing.

You don't need to have done 100% of your research to start writing your essay. Make notes as you research and organise these into key points. Use these as the basis for your bullet points. (Reference the source for your notes as you go — this will make referencing your essay later much easier.)

Once you have your bullet list essay outline, you can start writing — one bullet point at a time. This makes essay writing more manageable than trying to think about the whole piece at once. If you struggle to expand on a bullet point, you probably need to do more research. The good news? You only need to focus your research on this missing bit of information.

You don't need to tackle your bullet points in order. It's usually best to focus on whichever one you have the most information for or are in the mood to write about. You can go back and fill the gaps in any earlier bullet points later, once you’ve made some progress with the rest of your essay and built some momentum. (Mildly interesting fact: professional writers use "TK" as a placeholder for missing information. If you use a similar method, you can go back and search for "TK" once you've finished your first draft, then tackle each missing item one at a time until your essay draft is complete.

Keep writing and editing separate

Don't worry about word count or try to edit your essay while writing your first draft. Your first goal is to expand on each bullet point until you get all the way through your essay. The quality of writing in your first draft doesn't matter. What matters at the start is momentum. You can fix the word count by adding or removing words and tightening up your writing so it reads well after you've finished your first draft.

Once your first draft is written, you're ready to proofread and edit it. It's usually helpful to put your first draft aside for a few hours (ideally overnight) once you've finished it and come back to it with fresh eyes to edit it. you have two goals for this stage: 1. Edit for clarity 2. Edit for wordcount Go through it sentence by sentence and ask yourself these questions: · Have I said what I wanted to say? · Does it make sense? · Is this the best way to say it? If you are under your word count, look for areas where you can give more detail to improve the clarity or strength of your argument. If you are over your word count, look for places where you have repeated yourself or are over-explaining things. Also, look for ways you can restructure sentences to make them shorter. This can be challenging. It's usually easier to add words than cut them, but there should be parts of your first draft that are the written equivalent of "thinking aloud." You can often cut many words by focusing on these areas and turning whole paragraphs into single sentences. Similarly, long, complicated sentences can often be split into two or three simple short sentences that improve clarity and reduce your total wordcount.

Do the details last

Add references and formatting at the end. It's much quicker to write and edit your first draft if you don't worry about formatting and referencing at this early stage. Once you've edited for clarity and length, read back through your essay one final time, and format your text and add references as you go. Once you get to the end of this final pass, you are done.

You can (kind of) apply this approach to non-essay projects. Outline a project plan first before you get stuck in. If you plan well and make your decisions on paper before you start to execute your project, you're less likely to run into unforeseen problems part-way through and you should get a better finished project with less effort and stress as a result.

Essay writing summary

1. Start your essay by making a bullet point outline. This will break your essay into manageable bite-sized chunks. Your outline will expand and get reordered as you do your research 2. Once you're happy with your bullet point essay outline, write your first draft by expanding on each point. If any points are hard to expand on, move on to the next point. come back later and do more focused research on any missing points 3. Write your first draft quickly. Momentum is your friend. Don't worry about word count. You can add or remove words later when you edit it 4. Once you've finished your first draft, go back and fill in any missing points. Once you've done this, read through your essay and edit it for clarity and length. Short, simple sentences help with both of these, so use fewer commas and more full stops. 5. Once you have an edited essay of appropriate length, give it a final read-through, add references, and format it so it is presentable and easy to read.

  • Privacy policy
  • Advertising opportunities
  • Gender Pay Gap Report

© Nottingham Trent Students’ Union. Shakespeare Street, Nottingham, NG1 4GH

Registered Charity No. 1154401 | Company No. 08738730

Email: [email protected] | Tel: 0115 848 6200

Website designed by Harry Vann

Powered by OneVoice Digital

What Are Bullet Points ( • ) And How Do You Use Them?

  • What Is A Bullet Point?
  • When To Use Them
  • How To Use Them
  • Try Grammar Coach

Everybody likes lists. Nobody likes long, confusing lists. And that’s why we use bullet points to gather up major points or items and organize them neatly into a list. However, bullet points are just a tool in the toolbox; it is still up to the each writer to know how to use them to make a list or summary that is concise and easy to follow. While proper bullet point usage often relies heavily on a style guide, there are some general tips to ensure our bullet points always hit the mark.

do essay use bullet points

What is a bullet point ?

A bullet point is a symbol that is used in writing to introduce an item in a list. A commonly used symbol to represent a bullet point is a centered dot (•), but many different symbols and characters can be used in bullet point lists. Sometimes, bulleted lists even use numbers and/or letters.

✏️ Example usage of bullet points

The following example shows how a list with bullet points might appear in writing:

The experiment studied how children reacted differently to a variety of Halloween monsters. There were several major takeaways from the study :

  • Werewolves were consistently rated to be the scariest monsters.
  • Ugly vampires were typically said to be scarier than other types of vampires.
  • Zombies scored higher scariness ratings with young girls than with young boys.
  • Clowns, despite being a control group, scored unexpectedly high scariness ratings.

When do you use bullet points?

In writing, bullet points are typically only used in lists. In general, formal writing reserves bulleted lists for certain situations, such as the quick presentation of important information or to efficiently summarize a writer’s major points. In informal writing, bulleted lists can be used for a wide variety of reasons, such as presenting a list of ingredients or giving step-by-step directions on how to do something.

This means that you’ll need to use your own judgment on when a list with bullet points might be the best way to present information. In general, bulleted lists are helpful when you want to quickly and efficiently give a reader important information. In formal writing, it is usually recommended to not overuse bulleted lists and save them for when you really need to capture an audience’s attention.

The following examples show just some of the different ways we might use lists with bullet points in different pieces of writing:

Summarizing

Bullet points are useful for summarizing a longer, more complicated argument or topic. For example:

In conclusion, dogs clearly make better pets than cats.  In this thesis paper, I have argued that :

  • dogs are good pets, while cats are nefarious troublemakers
  • dogs live up to their moniker of “man’s best friend,” while cats merely tolerate humans at best
  • dogs can perform a variety of useful jobs for society, while cats are unapologetic freeloaders 

With these major points in mind, dogs clearly are the superior pet .

Highlighting major points

Bullet points can neatly order a writer’s major pints. For example:

After reading this guide to computers, you will be able to 

  • create folders and files
  • set up an internet connection
  • connect your computer to wireless devices
  • navigate all of the programs that come with your operating system
  • install and use virus protection software

List of items

Bullet points are useful or organizing lists. For example:

In order to make this recipe, you will need :

  • strawberries
  • cocoa powder
  • cream cheese

Pssst. Are you a writing rebel? We’ll tell you which grammar rules were meant to be broken.

Bullet points can help organize detailed instructions or directions. For example:

In order to reach the museum from Main Street, follow these directions exactly :

  • Drive south and turn left onto 2nd Street
  • Drive two miles, then merge onto Interstate 12
  • Drive ten miles, then take exit 17a
  • Pass the third intersection, then take the second right
  • Look for the museum on your right after passing the giant inflatable gorilla

Make Your Writing Shine!

  • By clicking "Sign Up", you are accepting Dictionary.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy policies.
  • Email This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

How to use bullet points

In general, the formatting and rules of bulleted lists will depend heavily on the style guide that you use. Style guides often have specific rules regarding indentation, margins, capitalization, punctuation, and which symbols to use as bullet points. As always, it is best to follow whatever rules are listed in the style guide you use. If you don’t use a particular style guide, it is best to at least stay consistent with whatever formatting you decide to use.

If not using a style guide, there are some general recommendations common among writing resources:

1. It is recommended to introduce a bulleted list with an introductory sentence or headline.

2. Punctuation is typically reserved for complete sentences. For example, the following bulleted list uses sentence fragments:

  • a little bit of fog

This list, on the other hand, uses complete sentences:

  • Students will sit in Section B.
  • Arena staff will sit in the front three rows.
  • VIPs may sit wherever they please.
  • All audience members must remain seated for the entirety of the performance.

3. In general, complete sentences are usually capitalized. Sentence fragments may or may not be capitalized depending on the writer.

4. It is commonly recommended that the elements of a bulleted list be relatively the same length.

5. Each bullet should begin with the same part of speech: verb, adjective, noun, etc.

6. Numbers/letters are used when the order of the items matters or when the list will refer to other specific entries in the list.

However, none of these recommendations are established rules of using bulleted lists. In general, you can use whatever format you like when using a bulleted list—if not following a style guide, of course. The important thing is to remain consistent and try to stick to a format that isn’t difficult for an audience to read or follow.

Take this quiz to see how much you know about bullet points and other typographical symbols.

Get to the point with Grammar Coach™

Confused about punctuation and its proper use? The Thesaurus.com Grammar Coach ™ platform makes writing papers, essays, emails, and a whole lot more a whole lot easier. This writing tool uses machine-learning technology uniquely designed to catch grammar as well as spelling errors. Its Synonym Swap will find the best nouns, adjectives, and more to help say what you really mean, guiding you toward clearer, stronger, writing.

It's time we point you in the direction of uncommon contractions. Find out about them here!

do essay use bullet points

Ways To Say

Synonym of the day

  • Have your assignments done by seasoned writers. 24/7
  • Contact us:
  • +1 (213) 221-0069
  • [email protected]

Can Research Paper Use Bullet Points: When & How to Use them

Can Research Paper Use Bullet Points: When & How to Use them

Bullet points in research paper

Bullet points in research paper

A research paper means that the writer will be doing extensive primary and secondary research to find out the required facts, statistics, and quotations and introduce insight. So, can a research paper contain bullet points?

Yes, bullet points help your paper flow better, especially in a research paper. A well-written and correctly formatted research paper must use bullet points to organize and present the introductory three paragraphs that introduce the topic being researched. Keep reading for additional insights.

do essay use bullet points

Can Research Paper Use Bullet Points?

A research paper can use bullet points if they help in presenting the findings of the research or listing the objectives of the study. In addition, including bullet points in your writing might be helpful to structure your text or draw attention to certain aspects of the topic you are discussing.

However, do not over-use them in writing.

If it helps the reader understand what you are saying better or makes it easier for them to read long lists of data or statistics, then it is acceptable to use bullet points in a research paper.

Yes, you can use bullet points in a research paper. It is all about the way you write them.

Msword bullet points

Bullets, or dot points, are used in many contexts to present information.

When writing a research paper , you may find that you want to use bullet points to highlight the most important parts of your paper.

Bullet points can be effective in this context because they are easy to read, allow you to present lots of information quickly, and keep your reader on track.

Research papers follow a specific structure and format.

You need to start with a good introduction, then give the supporting evidence for your thesis, and present everything in a well-structured manner. The conclusion sums up everything that you have written and allows the reader to have a clear picture of what your research has been focused on.

A research paper contains several sections: an abstract, introduction, literature review, methodology, results, discussion, and conclusion. Each section is crucial and should be presented clearly and adequately organized by using headings or subheadings if necessary.

However, when using bullet points, make sure they follow the same grammatical structure as the rest of your text.

People Also Read: How to Write an Email to a University: Admission or Information

How to Use Bullet Points in a Research Paper

Bullet points are a great way to organize your thoughts and help readers follow along. Writers sometimes use bullet points to list items because, in some cases, they can be more readable than an ordinary list of items.

For example, if there are three or more items in the list, the bullet points become easier to scan than a numbered list. The best approach is to observe the following:

bullet points in essay

1. Use Bullets for Shortlists

Bullets work best when you have three or more items on a list.

If your list is only one or two things long, consider rewriting your sentence not to require a list.

2. Use Bullets for Similar Ideas

Bullets work best when all of the items in the list are roughly equal in importance and length.

When your items differ significantly, using bullets can lead to confusion and make it harder for your reader to follow along.

3. Use Parallel Structure in your Bulleted Lists

Parallel structure is a grammatical term that uses the same structure in multiple parts of a sentence or paragraph.

In other words, if one item in your bullet list begins with a verb, all the different items should also begin with verbs; if one item is a phrase, all other items should also be phrases, etc.

How to Use Bullets

There are no fixed rules about how to use bullet points in academic writing, but here are some guidelines for their effective use:

  • Only use bullet points when the order of the items listed is not essential. If a sequence or charge is needed, then use numbers instead.
  • Do not start every sentence with a bullet point. This makes it look as though you cannot be bothered to write full sentences, and your work will appear sloppy., ,,, Use bullet points only when you have a list of two or more points; do not use them when introducing an individual issue (e.g., ‘The next topic is …’)
  • If you have multiple levels of information (i.e., sub-points), use different bullets to differentiate between them.
  • Indent all lines after the first line of each bullet point (similar to this paragraph). Do not add extra space between paragraphs.
  • Use phrases rather than complete sentences within the bullet points. Do not add punctuation at the end unless it is necessary for clarity (e.g., an internal comma or colon).

People Also Read: Can a Research Paper be Opinionated: Persuasive or Personal

Importance of Using Bullet Points

example of bullet list

Highlight Important Information

The key to using bullet points effectively is to ensure that they are consistent throughout your document and not overused.

Only use bullet points to clarify the material or help break up text and make it more readable.

Outline a Process

Bullet points are always used in conjunction with other paragraphs in papers, so they are not the paper’s main focus or a section of the paper. Because of this, they usually do not begin or end with a complete sentence.

The first word in a bullet point is usually capitalized, but the rest are lowercase unless proper nouns. Bullet points also use periods in the end to separate them.

Enhances Readability

It makes your paper more readable. It gives the readers a clear idea of what you are talking about without reading through long sentences and paragraphs of irrelevant information.

Mention items of Interest

Ensure that you include everything necessary for the paper. This consists of all items of interest and any extra things not mentioned in the paper’s main body. If you did not mention in the main body of the paper, then it should be appear in the reference section.

Highlight key Points

The importance of bullet points in research papers is to highlight the key points of your paper. In other words, it helps the reader to focus on the main topic and understand what you are discussing.

For example, if you were to write a paper about building a house, you would want to include bullet points to help the reader follow along with your construction process. In this article, we will discuss how bullet points can help you write your research paper.

People Also Read: Can you do a Research Paper in a day or Write 10-page essay

Instances When You Should Avoid Bullet Points in Research Paper

One of the most common ways to organize information in a document or presentation is through the use of bullet points. They are simple to read and easy to understand. However, they can also be overused. Here are several instances when you should avoid using bullet points in your research paper:

do not use

1. When You Are Not Sure How to Organize Your Points

The best way to keep track of your ideas is by using an outline. It helps you organize your thoughts into a clear and concise structure.

If you do not know how to write an outline, you should learn how before considering using bullet points in your paper.

2. When There Is No Clear Connection between Points

In general, bullet points are organized into groups that share a common theme or idea.

Using them willy-nilly with no particular order can make it difficult for the reader to follow what you are saying. Therefore, look for connections between ideas when writing a paper that uses bullet points.

3. When Your Paper Does Not Have an Introduction and Conclusion

Bullet points should occur as part of a larger argument or point made in a research paper. You can check how to present an argumentative research paper and learn the issue of points in a paper.

If no introduction or conclusion is tying those points together, then it will be difficult for the reader to follow along with what you are saying.

Josh Jasen

When not handling complex essays and academic writing tasks, Josh is busy advising students on how to pass assignments. In spare time, he loves playing football or walking with his dog around the park.

Related posts

Is a term paper an essay

Is a term paper an essay

Term paper Vs Essay Vs Research Paper: Is a term paper an essay

Writing an Argumentative Research Paper

Writing an Argumentative Research Paper

Is a Research Paper Argumentative: Tips on How to Write it

After Someone Copies Your Assignment

After Someone Copies Your Assignment

Someone Copied Your Assignment: What Happens & What to Do

  • Link to facebook
  • Link to linkedin
  • Link to twitter
  • Link to youtube
  • Writing Tips

How to Punctuate and Capitalise Bullet Points

4-minute read

  • 9th March 2020

Everyone loves a vertical list. They’re easy to read. They look good. Why wouldn’t you want to add a list to your work ? The tricky thing is punctuation. Do you need a colon to introduce a list? Should each point start with a capital letter and end with a full stop? So many choices to make!

To help, we’ve prepared a guide to punctuating and capitalising bullet points.

Introducing a List: Do You Need a Colon?

When a vertical list follows a full sentence, introduce it with a colon .

There are two main methods available:

  • Qualitative interviews with key staff members.
  • Quantitative surveys involving all stakeholders.

You can also use a colon after a partial sentence.

Available methods include:

However, you can omit the colon when a list follows a partial sentence.

Available methods include

This is ultimately a matter of stylistic preference. But if you are using a style guide, you may want to check it for guidance on which style to use.

Punctuating Bullet Points: Do You Need Full Stops?

We’re often asked whether you need a full stop at the end of each entry in a list. And, as a guideline, we’d suggest punctuating bullet points as follows:

  • When listing full sentences , use a full stop for each entry (like here).
  • For lists with longer sentence fragments , full stops are optional.
  • For a mix of fragments and full sentences , use a full stop at the end of each entry (just as you would for a list of full sentences).
  • When listing single words or short phrases , there’s no need for a full stop.

However, this again comes down to preference and your chosen style guide. The key thing is applying a clear and consistent punctuation style to all lists.

Semicolons and Commas in Lists

Although a little old-fashioned, some people like to use semicolons or commas in lists. This is usually done when each list entry finishes an introductory phrase, as shown below:

Over the weekend, I have

Find this useful?

Subscribe to our newsletter and get writing tips from our editors straight to your inbox.

  • Taken the dog for a walk by the river;
  • Attended a dance class with Yvonne; and
  • Made a spaghetti carbonara.

The idea is that the list reads like a single sentence, with semicolons separating each point, a conjunction just before the final entry, and a full stop at the end.

We could also write this list with commas instead of semicolons.

  • Taken the dog for a walk by the river,
  • Attended a dance class with Yvonne, and

These are perfectly acceptable, and some style guides suggest writing lists like this. However, most people now leave out the extra punctuation.

Capitalising Bullet Points

Finally, should you capitalise the first letter of each entry in a vertical list? And if so, when? This is another case where there are no hard rules! If you have a list of full sentences – or a list with a mix of full sentences and fragments – we suggest capitalising the first letter in each item.

Activities for this weekend:

  • Howl at the moon on the strike of midnight.
  • Take grandmother for lunch.
  • Dance on the graves of my enemies.
  • Introspective sitting and drinking.

For lists of fragments, short phrases, or words, capitalisation is optional:

My favourite fruits include:

  • dragon fruit
  • Dragon fruit

As with the other optional punctuation above, though, make sure to use a consistent capitalisation style throughout your writing. And if you’d like any more help with the punctuation and capitalisation of lists in a document, don’t forget we have proofreaders available 24/7 !

Share this article:

Post A New Comment

Get help from a language expert. Try our proofreading services for free.

3-minute read

How to Insert a Text Box in a Google Doc

Google Docs is a powerful collaborative tool, and mastering its features can significantly enhance your...

2-minute read

How to Cite the CDC in APA

If you’re writing about health issues, you might need to reference the Centers for Disease...

5-minute read

Six Product Description Generator Tools for Your Product Copy

Introduction If you’re involved with ecommerce, you’re likely familiar with the often painstaking process of...

What Is a Content Editor?

Are you interested in learning more about the role of a content editor and the...

The Benefits of Using an Online Proofreading Service

Proofreading is important to ensure your writing is clear and concise for your readers. Whether...

6 Online AI Presentation Maker Tools

Creating presentations can be time-consuming and frustrating. Trying to construct a visually appealing and informative...

Logo Harvard University

Make sure your writing is the best it can be with our expert English proofreading and editing.

You've unlocked a 7-day free trial to try Jasper!

How to write powerful bullet points your readers won't skip.

Bullet points are the key to writing content that grabs attention. Learn about why they’re valuable, and see examples to help you write your own.

Published on Nov 27, 2021

By Austin Distel

do essay use bullet points

In this age of non-stop stimulation online, capturing and keeping attention is a key goal for marketers. Grabbing and holding the attention of your audience can make or break your ability to bring awareness to your brand. 

Bullet points are a form of summarized content that offers readers the brevity they want without sacrificing value. To do this, your bullet points should be high-impact statements about your content. 

In this article, we’ll share ways you can use bullet points to make your content more appealing to readers while keeping their attention. We’ll also highlight an important tool to help you write persuasive bullet points. 

Numbered lists vs. bulleted lists

Generally, there are two forms of lists — numbered lists and bulleted lists. Here are some writing tips for using each option.

When numbered lists are better

A numbered list is information introduced with a numerical value; a number. These lists are best used when the order of the items in the list matter i.e. the order in which you complete the steps is important. 

Numbered lists might be used for any of the following reasons:

  • Making a top 10 list
  • Writing a step-by-step guide
  • Listing hypotheses

Here’s how a numbered list would work in a step-by-step guide. For example, this guide teaches you how to wash a car:

  • Prepare two buckets of water with a cleaning solution and a spare cloth.
  • Park your car in an open space where you can reach all sides.
  • Rinse the car with clean water to remove any loose dirt or mud.
  • Dip the cloth in the cleaning solution and use it to wipe the car down, from top to bottom.
  • Rinse the car again with clean water to remove all the cleaning solution.
  • Wax your car for added shine and luxury.

When bulleted lists win

We use bullet lists instead of a numbered list if the order of the points doesn’t matter. These lists begin with a special character most commonly resembling dots, which may be a small filled-in circle or a small outlined circle.

Bulleted lists are also more versatile than numbered lists. 

The benefits of bulleted lists include that they:

  • Share content efficiently: Simplifying content into its essence gets your point across faster.
  • Improve readability: Readers enjoy content more (and stick around longer) when it is easier to skim and read.
  • Draw attention to the most important information: Readers grasp valuable information more quickly.

How to write powerful bullet points

Writing strong bullet points doesn’t have to be a mystery. Here’s what you need to know to write bulleted lists that keep readers interested in your blog articles :

1. Keep bullet points symmetrical

Make sure all the points in your list are about the same length. eye-tracking research shows that symmetrical content holds readers’ attention for longer. consistency is key for readability., for example:.

  • Keep bullet points symmetrical
  • Make sure they’re simple to read
  • When writing bullet points, make sure they’re simple and easy to read — this makes it easier for readers to follow

It’s harder for readers’ eyes to follow your second bullet because it strays much farther than the first.

2. Simplify your idea 

Powerful bullet points get right to the point with no added fluff words or ideas. You can do this by removing any extra words and including only the most important ideas and phrases. For example:

  • Eat oranges for extra vitamin C
  • You can eat oranges to increase the amount of vitamin C in your body

3. Make them mini-headlines

Think of writing your bulleted lists the way you would write a catchy headline . It’s important to include the most important information first, then add details afterwards. You might want to incorporate power words into your first phrase to add strength to your bullet point. For example:

  • Access power words instantly
  • Get access to all the best words to use right away

4. Begin with verbs 

Verbs pull readers in instantly by offering the most informative words first. Additionally, leading with verbs creates more impactful sentences, since they emphasize the action. Strong verbs don’t require an accompanying adjective because they are descriptive on their own. For example:

  • Begin bullet points with a verb
  • To start a bullet point, use a verb

5. Incorporate keywords 

Emphasizing your keywords doesn’t just help readers find the information they need faster, it increases your article’s chances of ranking as a featured snippet . Better SEO leads to more traffic for your article and website.

5 vital tips for using bullet points effectively

Bullet points make your content shine and stand out from the crowd. Follow these writing tips to make your bullet points the best possible:

  • Write in short phrases: Effective bullet points are short and to the point. Long bullet points defeat the goal of scannable content and will lose your audience's attention. 
  • Remove transition words: Bullet points don’t need to be full sentences. Words like “next” or “additionally” are unnecessary and only slow your reader down.
  • Emphasize the first few words : For longer bullets, summarize the main point in the first few words. Let the rest of the sentence explain the shortened concept or idea.
  • Don’t use too many bullets: A long wall of bullet lists is as good as no bullets. The same thing goes for sub-bullet or nested bullet points. It results in cluttered text that is hard to skim.
  • Ensure continuity: Make sure that your introductory sentence flows seamlessly into your bullet points. Each bullet list should form a grammatically correct sentence when joined with the introductory sentence. See an example below. 

Amara’s favorite fruits are:

  • She likes apples
  • She likes to eat bananas

Punctuation and grammar in bulleted lists

Both punctuation and grammatical structure matter in bulleted lists. Poor punctuation makes your article look poorly done and can cost you your credibility. To ensure this doesn’t happen, make sure to follow these style guidelines.

Capitalization

Typically, the first word of each bullet point starts with a capital letter. This is the standard in business writing and online content. If your bullet points are single words or phrases, some style guides allow you to begin with a lowercase letter.

It’s up to you whether to make your bullet points complete sentences, a short headline, or just a few words. Regardless, try to maintain the same format for all of the bullet points in the list. If your bullet point is just a phrase or sentence fragment, don’t add a period at the end.

If your bullet point is a whole sentence, make sure to finish it off with a period. Adding a period after each bullet point indicates a full stop. If your point is a sentence fragment or phrase, it doesn’t need a period.

When introducing a bulleted list, make sure your introductory phrase or sentence ends with a  colon — not a dash or semicolon. 

5 great examples of bullet points to learn from

Want to see excellent examples of bullet point usage across a variety of platforms? We’ve gathered three examples to get you started: 

1. Bullet list example by APA Style Guide ‍

examples of bullet points APA Style Guide

This bulleted list is introduced with a phrase that only mentions the most important information. It shows how a single word or phrase can be used to effectively share the main idea. 

2. Bulleted list example from the CoSchedule blog

examples of bullet points Coschedule blog

This list has a bold introductory phrase, letting readers know exactly what the list is for. It also helps them find the bullet points quickly in the article. The list comes immediately after a short couple of sentences, which maintains flow as someone reads the article.

We love that it uses just a few words or a single phrase for each point, keeping the information simple and clear. Notice how each of the list items begins with a capital letter.

3. Bulleted list example by ConvertKit

examples of bullet points convertkit blog

Here’s another bulleted list that is introduced with a sentence. Notice how the first word is bolded to emphasize the most important information first. The sentence that follows describes the initial point to add clarity and detail. Also, see how each one of the points follows the same format for ease of reading.

4. Bulleted list example by Zapier

examples of bullet points Zapier blog

This bullet list is unique because it’s written in the first person. The author successfully uses symmetry, verbs, and short phrases to quickly and effectively make his points clear. Readers get an instant feel for his success with these powerful bullet points.

5. Bulleted list example by Ahrefs

examples of bullet points Ahrefs blog

This is an example of a bulleted list that replaces long sentences with short and sweet points. Rather than losing readers’ interest with a paragraph explaining these points, a short bullet list does the trick to share the information while keeping readers engaged.

Creating persuasive bullet points with Jasper AI

AI can assist you with writing in various ways, including writing powerful bullet points. Take Jasper’s Persuasive Bullet Points template, for instance. 

It’s so easy to add in your information, select how many outputs you’d like, and hit “Generate AI Content” for instant optimization.

Jarvis Persuasive Bullet Points template - examples of bullet points

With Jasper, you can take your value-packed product description and transform it with engaging and magnetic bullet points. There — your product description just went from boring to brilliant! 

Write anything about your company or product and let Jasper give it the extra boost to catch the eye of your ideal customer. Jasper recognizes power words, patterns, and knows which short phrases will be key for conveying your information. 

Our AI writer distills bulky text into convincing, high-impact bullet points for landing pages, product descriptions, and article readability. 

You don’t have to stop at bullet points though. Jasper can help with all of your content writing needs with over 52 different templates to take your writing from boring to brilliant. You can also get more out of Jasper by using the guides in Jasper Jumpstart .

You’ll get upgraded copy in no time — no editor needed! Don’t take our word for it, sign up with Jasper and try it yourself today.

 alt=

Meet The Author:

Austin Distel

Austin Distel

Austin Distel is the Sr. Director of Marketing at Jasper , your AI marketing co-pilot. When not working, Austin is also an Airbnb superhost in Austin, Texas.

Enjoy this post? Join over 4 million people who are learning to master AI in 2024.

More from the jasper blog:.

do essay use bullet points

The New B2B Content Playbook: Everything Old Is New Again

do essay use bullet points

The Most Interesting Marketing Insights from Hubspot’s 2024 State of Marketing Report

do essay use bullet points

The Biggest AI Insights from Hubspot’s 2024 State of Marketing Report

Ready to create better content with ai.

To schedule a demo for companies under 200 employees, reach out to sales at the email above. Please use business email to meet with our team.

Trusted by 100,000+ teams at innovative companies like:

Lorem ipsum

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s.

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

The US Capitol building.

US House votes to pass antisemitism bill in response to campus protests

Bill to use language by International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance to define antisemitism, which critics say would chill speech

The US House of Representatives has voted to pass an antisemitism awareness bill, a controversial measure sponsored by a New York Republican amid controversy over pro-Palestinian protests on college campuses in Manhattan and across the US, as Israel’s war with Hamas drags on.

The bill passed 320-91 with some bipartisan support.

Mike Lawler’s bill will “provide for the consideration of a definition of antisemitism set forth by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance for the enforcement of federal anti-discrimination laws concerning education programs or activities, and for other purposes”.

Democrats opposed it as a messaging bill meant simply to boost Republicans on a hot-button issue and trap Democrats into taking politically awkward votes.

The American Civil Liberties Union opposed the bill, telling members : “Federal law already prohibits antisemitic discrimination and harassment by federally funded entities.

“[The bill] is therefore not needed to protect against antisemitic discrimination; instead, it would likely chill free speech of students on college campuses by incorrectly equating criticism of the Israeli government with antisemitism.”

The Foundation for Middle East Peace (FMEP), which “works to ensure a just, secure and peaceful future for Palestinians and Israelis”, has defined the shifting meaning of “antisemitism” in US political discourse.

“Traditionally,” the FMEP says, “‘antisemitism’ has meant hostility and prejudice toward Jews because they are Jews – a scourge that has imperiled Jews throughout history, and is a source of resurgent threats to Jews today.

“In recent years there has been an energetic effort to redefine the term to mean something else. This new definition – known today as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s ‘ working definition of antisemitism ’, is explicitly politicised, refocusing the term to encompass not only hatred of Jews, but also hostility toward and criticism of the modern state of Israel.”

In the House on Tuesday morning, the Illinois Republican Mary E Miller acted as speaker pro tempore to oversee debate on the Republican antisemitism awareness bill.

As a choice, it was not without irony. Miller made headlines in 2021, when as a newly elected member of Congress she was forced to apologise after saying in a speech at the Capitol: “Hitler was right on one thing. He said, ‘Whoever has the youth has the future.’ Our children are being propagandised.”

Representatives for Miller did not respond to a Guardian request for comment.

Introducing the bill with Lawler sitting beside her, Michelle Fischbach, a Minnesota Republican, said: “Jewish college students have faced increasing antisemitism. And since 7 October there has been an over 300% increase in incidents on campuses.”

More than 1,100 people were killed on 7 October, when Hamas attacked Israel. More than 34,000 people have been killed in Gaza during the subsequent Israeli offensive.

Fischbach continued: “Students are supposed to be protected from harassment. But it has been made abundantly clear that the leaders of these institutions are not going to do anything to stop it. Instead, they are allowing large-scale harassment to reign, forcing Jewish students to stay home. Since these institutions refuse to protect their students, it is time for Congress to take action.”

after newsletter promotion

Teresa Leger Fernandez, a Democrat from New Mexico, spoke in answer to Fischbach. She quoted Thomas Massie, a rightwing Republican from Kentucky, as saying the bill was “a political trap … designed to split the Democrat [sic] party and get them stuck” on an issue over which the party is divided.

Leger Fernandez also said a different bill should be considered, to “designate a senior official at the [US] Department of Education to combat antisemitism on college campuses”.

In his own remarks, Lawler listed alleged outrages on college campuses and said: “We must give the Department of Education the tools to identify and prosecute any antisemitic hate crimes committed and hold college administrators accountable for refusing to address antisemitism on their campuses.”

Democrats, he said, were “tripping over themselves because of electoral politics” in states with large Muslim populations which traditionally vote Democratic.

Debate then descended into back-and-forth over whether the bill was necessary to defend Jewish students, as Republicans claimed, or an illegitimate attack on free speech, however abhorrent that speech might be, as some Democrats said.

In closing, Leger Fernandez said: “We need to remind everybody we all condemn 7 October. We all have condemned Hamas as a terrorist organisation.

“We have taken up these resolutions over and over again. And once again, our Republican colleague [Massie] has spoken the truth when he has said that these are sticky resolutions simply intended to divide the Democrats.

“Let’s not work on division. Let’s come together in love, and in belief, and [use] our individual strength to push back against the hatred that we see, and to do it in a manner that is not partisan.”

  • House of Representatives
  • Antisemitism
  • Freedom of speech
  • Israel-Gaza war
  • US universities
  • Higher education

Most viewed

IMAGES

  1. How to Write Powerful Bullet Points Your Readers Won't Skip

    do essay use bullet points

  2. Can an Essay have Bullet Points? Tips How to use them Right

    do essay use bullet points

  3. Best practice for writing and formatting bulleted lists

    do essay use bullet points

  4. Effective Use of Bullet Points in Business Writing

    do essay use bullet points

  5. Can an Essay have Bullet Points? Tips How to use them Right

    do essay use bullet points

  6. IS223 Business writing bullet point guidelines

    do essay use bullet points

VIDEO

  1. How to add checkmark bullet points in pdf using Adobe Acrobat Pro DC

  2. 3 Reasons Bullet Points Are Hurting Your Presentation And What You Can Do About It

  3. Simple 2024 Bullet Journal Setup 💜

  4. Why are most target Bullets, hollow points

  5. How to add bullet points to your Kindle Book

  6. AMCAS Work & Activities FAQ: Answering Your Burning Questions

COMMENTS

  1. How To List Things in an Essay (APA and MLA)

    Let us go through how to list things in an essay. When adding a list of subtopics or themes, lists of recommendations, phases of analysis, components of an item, and the like, readers often get your point fast. The key to using lists in an essay is to employ proper punctuation and grammar, as well as to maintain a consistent grammatical style.

  2. Bulleted lists

    Bulleted Lists. To draw visual attention to items in a list without implying that items go in a certain order (e.g., chronology, importance, priority), use a bulleted list. Use a numbered list if you want to display items in a numbered series. Use a lettered list if you want to emphasize separate parallel items within a sentence.

  3. Can an Essay have Bullet Points? Tips How to use them Right

    An essay can have bullet points if they help in presenting the arguments that the essay seeks to present. The points can help the reader understand more about the subject being written about. However, bullets in an essay should be restricted to a few lines because it is not feasible to write the whole essay in point form. An essay is a prose text and can only accommodate a few bullets.

  4. Bullet Points

    Do you want to learn how to use bullet points effectively in your writing? Whether you need to make a list, highlight key points, or organize your ideas, bullet points can help you communicate clearly and concisely. In this article, you will find out the rules, usage, and examples of bullet points, as well as how to punctuate them correctly. Don't miss this useful guide from Grammarist, the ...

  5. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    point A and point B in this text," readers will want to see how you solve that inconsistency in your essay. • suggests an answer complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of discussion. If the question is too vague, it won't suggest a line of argument. The question should elicit reflection and argument rather than summary or description.

  6. Bullet Points: When and How to Use Them in Your Writing

    The text that is used to introduce a section of bullet points should end in a colon. When the information provided in bullet points is a complete sentence, it should begin with a capital letter and end with proper punctuation. Bullet points do not necessarily have to be complete sentences. For the biggest impact, bullet point statements should ...

  7. Bullet Point Your Research Paper: A How-To Guide

    English: This guide to bullet point research paper writing has provided an in-depth examination of the structure and organization that can make this process easier. By following these steps, writers will be able to produce concise yet effective papers with a well-crafted flow and thoughtful presentation of information.

  8. Planning and structuring your essay

    Planning your essay makes it much more likely that you will end up with a coherent argument. ... Bullet points / linear plans - This type of plan lists the main points using bullet points or numbers. It can be a brief outline of the main point per paragraph, or a more detailed plan with sub-points and a note of the evidence to support each ...

  9. When To Use Bullet Points In Your Writing

    Inappropriate use of bullet points arises when writers attempt to present an argument in list form. Bullet points alone are insufficient to constitute an argument. While bullet points can be helpful for complex ideas, they can also result in disjointed points. As such, connecting the pieces and ensuring the argument flows logically is crucial.

  10. The Writing Process

    Use bullet points or numbering to make your structure clear at a glance. Even for a short text that won't use headings, it's useful to summarize what you'll discuss in each paragraph. An outline for a literary analysis essay might look something like this: Example of an essay structure outline

  11. How to Punctuate Bullet Points Correctly

    The important thing is consistency; once you have settled on an approach, stick to it! Capitalize the first letter of the first word of each bullet point, putting the remainder in sentence case (i.e., as if you were writing a normal sentence). Next, decide whether to use punctuation at the end of each bullet point item.

  12. Can an essay have bullet points?

    First, identify the main points you want to make. Then, write them out as concise statements, each on its own line. Finally, use these bullet points to structure your essay, ensuring that each ...

  13. Creating Vertical Lists in MLA Style

    Creating Vertical Lists in MLA Style. by Jennifer Rappaport. Note: This post relates to content in the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook. For up-to-date guidance, see the ninth edition of the MLA Handbook. Although in humanities essays, lists are generally run into the text, in other types of material, a vertical list may be preferable.

  14. Best practice for writing and formatting bulleted lists

    Bulleted lists might seem easy, but they're actually difficult to do well. Spending time on the formatting and text of your list is therefore well worth it. #1: Avoid more than seven items in a bulleted list. The first point is a structural one - don't list too many things at once. A long bulleted list is certainly better than the same ...

  15. How to Use Bullet Lists and Number Lists in a Research Paper

    For example (using bullet points): Make perfect banana bread every time by following these easy steps: Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Grease an 8 x 8 baking dish. Combine all the dry ingredients (listed above). Gently fold in the wet ingredients (listed above). Pour the batter into the dish and bake for 45 minutes.

  16. How do I quote bulleted or numbered points from a source?

    If you need to quote from a bulleted or numbered list, you can reproduce the list in your essay, as in the example below: Parvini organizes the material into four groups: The key events of the Wars of the Roses and the corresponding key plot points of Shakespeare's two tetralogies. (95) Parvini, Neema. "Historicism 'By Stealth': History ...

  17. Essay writing tips @ Nottingham Trent Students' Union

    Essay writing summary. 1. Start your essay by making a bullet point outline. This will break your essay into manageable bite-sized chunks. Your outline will expand and get reordered as you do your research. 2. Once you're happy with your bullet point essay outline, write your first draft by expanding on each point.

  18. What Is A Bullet Point ( • ) & How Do You Use It?

    Bullet points are used in writing to introduce an item in a list. Learn how to use bullet points with these examples and best practices.

  19. Can Research Paper Use Bullet Points: When & How to Use them

    A research paper can use bullet points if they help in presenting the findings of the research or listing the objectives of the study. In addition, including bullet points in your writing might be helpful to structure your text or draw attention to certain aspects of the topic you are discussing. However, do not over-use them in writing.

  20. How to Punctuate and Capitalise Bullet Points

    And, as a guideline, we'd suggest punctuating bullet points as follows: When listing full sentences, use a full stop for each entry (like here). For lists with longer sentence fragments, full stops are optional. For a mix of fragments and full sentences, use a full stop at the end of each entry (just as you would for a list of full sentences ...

  21. How to Write Powerful Bullet Points Your Readers Won't Skip

    Regardless, try to maintain the same format for all of the bullet points in the list. If your bullet point is just a phrase or sentence fragment, don't add a period at the end. Periods. If your bullet point is a whole sentence, make sure to finish it off with a period. Adding a period after each bullet point indicates a full stop.

  22. US House votes to pass antisemitism bill in response to campus protests

    Bill to use language by International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance to define antisemitism, which critics say would chill speech The US House of Representatives has voted to pass an antisemitism ...