• Search All Scholarships
  • Exclusive Scholarships
  • Easy Scholarships to Apply For
  • No Essay Scholarships
  • Scholarships for HS Juniors
  • Scholarships for HS Seniors
  • Scholarships for College Students
  • Scholarships for Grad Students
  • Scholarships for Women
  • Scholarships for Black Students
  • Scholarships
  • Student Loans
  • College Admissions
  • Financial Aid
  • Scholarship Winners
  • Scholarship Providers

Student-centric advice and objective recommendations

Higher education has never been more confusing or expensive. Our goal is to help you navigate the very big decisions related to higher ed with objective information and expert advice. Each piece of content on the site is original, based on extensive research, and reviewed by multiple editors, including a subject matter expert. This ensures that all of our content is up-to-date, useful, accurate, and thorough.

Our reviews and recommendations are based on extensive research, testing, and feedback. We may receive commission from links on our website, but that doesn’t affect our editors’ opinions. Our marketing partners don’t review, approve or endorse our editorial content. It’s accurate to the best of our knowledge when posted. You can find a complete list of our partners here .

How to Write a College Transfer Essay (With Examples)

transfer essay example ut

Lisa Freedland is a Scholarships360 writer with personal experience in psychological research and content writing. She has written content for an online fact-checking organization and has conducted research at the University of Southern California as well as the University of California, Irvine. Lisa graduated from the University of Southern California in Fall 2021 with a degree in Psychology.

Learn about our editorial policies

transfer essay example ut

Bill Jack has over a decade of experience in college admissions and financial aid. Since 2008, he has worked at Colby College, Wesleyan University, University of Maine at Farmington, and Bates College.

How to Write a College Transfer Essay (With Examples)

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, over 1.2 million students are enrolled in college as a transfer student. Students may transfer for a variety of reasons ranging from academics to athletics to geography.

If you are in the process of transferring colleges it’s likely that you will have to write a personal essay as part of your transfer admissions process. Ultimately, there’s no one way to write a college transfer essay. Everyone is unique, and this individuality should shine through in your essays.

However, there are some recommended things to include, and even a real example essay that was used to successfully transfer college! In this post, we’ll help you write a powerful transfer essay so you can tell your story to the admissions committee.

Jump ahead to…

  • Do’s and don’ts
  • Why did you choose your current school?

What are your main reasons for transferring out of your current school?

Why do you want to attend the transfer school.

  • Example essay

Additional resources

  • Key takeaways
  • Frequently asked questions

College transfer essays: The do’s and don’ts

Before we start, we want to cover a few basics do’s and don’ts about what your transfer essays should be about.

  • Elaborate on how your current school has helped you progress towards your goals. Positivity is always a good thing!
  • Research your prospective school (e.g. specific classes, organizations, opportunities) for why you want to go there.
  • Make sure to follow the standard/correct essay format! Transfer essay prompts may vary from college to college so you should make sure that you’re answering the exact question.
  • Use up your limited word count by listing negative aspects about your current school. Instead, focus on how it has helped you grow, but how another school could further help you develop your interests/passions 
  • List a group of random classes or opportunities available at your new school. Mention opportunities you’re (genuinely) interested in that relate to your goals and passions – make sure you’re telling a story through your essay.
  • Copy your initial admissions essay (the one that you used when applying to colleges in high school) – you’ve changed a lot during your time in college so you will want to write a brand new essay.

Apply to these scholarships due soon

$10,000 “No Essay” Scholarship

$10,000 “No Essay” Scholarship

$2,000 Sallie Mae Scholarship

$2,000 Sallie Mae Scholarship

Making the Leap Scholarship for Transfer Students

Making the Leap Scholarship for Transfer Students

$40,000 Build a College List Scholarship

$40,000 Build a College List Scholarship

SENEDIA STEM Scholarship

SENEDIA STEM Scholarship

Niche $25,000 “No Essay” Scholarship

Niche $25,000 “No Essay” Scholarship

Husband and Wife Law Team Scholarship

Husband and Wife Law Team Scholarship

Darrel Hess Community College Geography Scholarship

Darrel Hess Community College Geography Scholarship

$25k “Be Bold” No-Essay Scholarship

$25k “Be Bold” No-Essay Scholarship

What is the goal of the transfer essay.

Potential transfer students should know that not all colleges and universities require transfer essays, so when in doubt definitely check-in with the college in question for clarification. For the purposes of this article and the sample transfer essay, we’ll be using this prompt:

Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve. 

Most colleges will be interested in learning why you want to transfer and how transferring will help you achieve your goals. However, specific prompts will vary from college to college, so you should definitely pay attention to the specific prompt you are asked to respond to.

Some of the common questions you’ll come across include:

  • How will your transfer school help you accomplish your goals?

Below I’ll break down how to respond to each of these questions and include an example from a successful transfer essay.

Also see: Can you transfer into an ivy league school?

Why did you choose your current school? 

To answer this question, you’ll have to go back in time when you were in 12th grade and selecting your college. Did you choose the college because it had a program you liked? Maybe you really wanted to take classes with a specific professor? Maybe you thought you wanted to attend college in a specific part of the world? Whatever the reason you should lay it out in the most factual way possible.

Here’s how I responded to this question:

Just like Jeopardy, Criminal Minds is also a show that I have watched from a very young age, and one that I continue to watch quite regularly. Being exposed to this interesting world of FBI profilers for so long inspired me to want to dive into the world of psychology myself. Due to this, I originally chose the University of Wisconsin, Madison for its amazing psychology program, and because I wanted to try something new. Being from California, this “something new” came in the form of watching snow fall from the sky, seeing cheese curds being sold in all the grocery stores, and simply living somewhere far away from home.

Also see: How to write a 250 word essay

This is always an important question for transfer admissions officers: why did your current college not work out? We recommend that students be as honest as possible and stick to the facts (as opposed to simply complaining about your current school).

Students have very different reasons for changing schools, which often depend on what type of school you’re transferring from (a 2-year or 4-year). While many community college students transfer because their plans did work out and they’ve accomplished what they wanted to at their school, those transferring from four-year universities often do so for less positive reasons (which was my experience).

If the situation at your college didn’t exactly pan out as you thought it would, you should also try to talk about some of the ways you are making the most of the situation. This shows the admissions officers that despite the less-than-ideal circumstances, you have continued to learn, grow, and contribute to your community.

Here’s how I accomplished this:

Arriving in Wisconsin, I got exactly what I wanted: an amazing psychology program and the experience of being somewhere quite different from the place I called home. My classes were interesting, my professors were helpful and caring, and experiencing the first snow was quite exciting. However, as winter progressed, walking back from class everyday under the progressively gloomier sky seemed to be a cruel reminder that I was no longer in sunny Southern California. While eating dinner in our many dining halls, I always viewed the wide array of food available: quesadillas, Chinese food, burgers, even pecan pie. The food was all delicious, but going day after day without even seeing Korean food once made me miss those fun dinners with my family. Back at my dorm, my “home away from home”, it started to feel like anything but being at home. To feel more comfortable where I was, I decided to pursue things I liked, and that I was familiar with. My passion for psychology led me to join the university’s Psychology Club, where I was able to learn about recent revelations within the field of psychology, furthering my interest in the subject. 

Going through the admissions process as a transfer student is interesting, because you have learned a lot about yourself and your preferences at your first college. This should provide you with a great perspective on what you are looking for next.

The two major things you’ll want to accomplish when answering this question are why the transfer college in question is a good fit for you and how it can help you accomplish your goals as a student.

Specificity is always more ideal here so you can show that you have spent some time thinking about what you want and also how the new college fits.

Here’s how I did this:

I plan on using the knowledge I gain in psychology, either from organizations or classes, to help people. I want to one day apply this knowledge to research, to discover possible methods to help the people suffering from the psychological problems I study. Alternatively, I hope to use this knowledge as a criminal profiler, using my understanding of psychology to narrow down pools of suspects.  To be able to accomplish either of these, I need to develop a much deeper understanding of both people’s motivations for the things they do as well as of the many psychological issues people face. For these reasons, I am very excited at the prospect of exploring and enrolling in the classes offered by USC’s Department of Psychology. In particular, Psych 360: Abnormal Psychology would be an amazing introduction to psychological disorders and their causes. Psych 314L: Research Methods would then help me put this knowledge about disorders to good use by teaching me how to properly conduct research and find possible solutions for people’s problems.

College transfer essays: an example

Here we go! Throughout this article, I’ve shown you my college essay divided into sections, and now’s time for the full thing. I can honestly say that this essay had a 100% success rate! Without further ado, here is my full college transfer essay (and prompt):

Prompt: Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve. 

I wake up from my daily after-school nap to realize that it is already dinner time. As I walk downstairs, I smell the delicious fragrance coming from my mom’s samgyetang (Korean ginseng chicken soup), one of my favorite meals. Soon enough, everyone sits down to watch the newest episode of Jeopardy , a tradition we’ve had going on for as long as I can remember. As I take that first sip of samgyetang, and miss yet another geography question on Jeopardy – and wait for my family to inevitably tease me about it – I feel at home, like I am somewhere that I belong. Wherever I go, I hope I can encounter that same warm feeling. Just like Jeopardy , Criminal Minds is also a show that I have watched from a very young age, and one that I continue to watch quite regularly. Being exposed to this interesting world of FBI profilers for so long inspired me to want to dive into the world of psychology myself. Due to this, I originally chose the University of Wisconsin, Madison for its amazing psychology program, and because I wanted to try something new. Being from California, this “something new” came in the form of watching snow fall from the sky, seeing cheese curds being sold in all the grocery stores, and simply living somewhere far away from home. Arriving in Wisconsin, I got exactly what I wanted: an amazing psychology program and the experience of being somewhere quite different from the place I called home. My classes were interesting, my professors were helpful and caring, and experiencing the first snow was quite exciting. However, as winter progressed, walking back from class everyday under the progressively gloomier sky seemed to be a cruel reminder that I was no longer in sunny Southern California. While eating dinner in our many dining halls, I always viewed the wide array of food available: quesadillas, Chinese food, burgers, even pecan pie. The food was all delicious, but going day after day without even seeing Korean food once, it made me miss those fun dinners with my family. Back at my dorm, my “home away from home,” it started to feel like anything but being at home. To feel more comfortable where I was, I decided to pursue things I liked, and that I was familiar with. My passion for psychology led me to join the university’s Psychology Club, where I was able to learn about recent revelations within the field of psychology, furthering my interest in the subject. I plan on using the knowledge I gain in psychology, either from organizations or classes, to help people. I want to one day apply this knowledge to research, to discover possible methods to help the people suffering from the psychological problems I study. Alternatively, I hope to use this knowledge as a criminal profiler, using my understanding of psychology to narrow down pools of suspects.  To be able to accomplish either of these, I need to develop a much deeper understanding of both people’s motivations for the things they do as well as of the many psychological issues people face. For these reasons, I am very excited at the prospect of exploring and enrolling in the classes offered by USC’s Department of Psychology. In particular, Psych 360: Abnormal Psychology would be an amazing introduction to psychological disorders and their causes. Psych 314L: Research Methods would then help me put this knowledge about disorders to good use by teaching me how to properly conduct research and find possible solutions for people’s problems. With so many opportunities available at USC, I hope to not only help others feel more comfortable, but to find a second home for myself after all.

And that’s it! This essay touches on all of the tips listed above, and should serve as helpful inspiration as you begin your writing. Hopefully, it gives you an idea of how to integrate everything you should mention in a cohesive essay. With that, I wish you good luck with your college transfer essays (and applications)!

Don’t miss: What looks good on a college application?

If you finish your essay and still have questions about the transfer process, consider checking out these Scholarships360 resources:

  • How to transfer colleges
  • How to transfer from a community college
  • Top scholarships for transfer students
  • How to choose a college
  • What’s the difference between a private and public university?

Key Takeaways

  • Explain why you want to transfer, what you need that you are not getting at your current school, and why you chose your current school to begin with
  • Always present things in a positive light
  • Share how the transfer school will help you achieve your goals and why you are a good fit for the school

Frequently asked questions about writing college transfer essays 

How are college transfer essays different from regular application essays, do all schools require transfer essays, can i reuse my old college essays for a transfer, what should you not say in a transfer essay, scholarships360 recommended.

transfer essay example ut

10 Tips for Successful College Applications

transfer essay example ut

Coalition vs. Common App: What is the difference?

transfer essay example ut

College Application Deadlines 2023-2024: What You Need to Know

Trending now.

transfer essay example ut

How to Convert Your GPA to a 4.0 Scale

transfer essay example ut

PSAT to SAT Score Conversion: Predict Your Score

transfer essay example ut

What Are Public Ivy League Schools?

3 reasons to join scholarships360.

  • Automatic entry to our $10,000 No-Essay Scholarship
  • Personalized matching to thousands of vetted scholarships
  • Quick apply for scholarships exclusive to our platform

By the way...Scholarships360 is 100% free!

What are your chances of acceptance?

Calculate for all schools, your chance of acceptance.

 UT Austin

Your chancing factors

Extracurriculars.

transfer essay example ut

2 Awesome UT Austin Essay Examples

transfer essay example ut

The University of Texas at Austin is one of the hardest colleges to get into in Texas . With a competitive acceptance rate, the school is moderately selective. Writing strong essays, however, will certainly boost your chances. 

UT Austin requires one long essay and three short answers, with an additional optional short answer question. There are also a handful of program-specific prompts. 

In this post, we’ll analyze sample essays written by a real applicants, sharing what they did well and what could be improved.

Please note: Looking at examples of real essays students have submitted to colleges can be very beneficial to get inspiration for your essays. You should never copy or plagiarize from these examples when writing your own essays. Colleges can tell when an essay isn’t genuine and will not view students favorably if they plagiarized. 

Read our UT Austin essay breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year’s supplemental prompts. 

Essay Example #1

Prompt: Using a favorite quotation from an essay or book you have read in the last three years as a starting point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world. Please write the quotation, title and author at the beginning of your essay (prompt from the 2020-2021 cycle). 

“Fortunately, among these people a man was judged according to his worth and not according to the worth of his father.”

– Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart 

Like most children, I aspired to my father. 

I saw my dad as an image of whom I wanted to be. Charismatic, genuine, respected among his peers – he embodied the qualities I saw essential to being a successful person. 

The most appealing to me, however, was my father’s medical background. As the first person to attend university in our extended family, he had always been revered for his accomplishment of becoming a doctor. 

As a direct consequence, biology was a keen passion during my childhood. I remember how each evening, as I was being tucked into bed, I would unload an avalanche of questions on my dad, many of them amusingly simple such as: If my body is 70% water, why don’t I have water spilling out of my finger every time I get a papercut? In school, I’d stay after class to probe my teachers about the topics I had read of but did not yet comprehend. And anytime I was asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I, without a whiff of doubt, bolted out I was going to be a doctor. 

However, as I got older, I developed new interests – in particular, social science and leadership – which did not always align with my childhood goals of medicine and biology. 

With this dichotomy in my mind, I decided to spend my sophomore summer volunteering at a hospital. 

Once there, it suddenly dawned on me that, for my entire life, I had viewed being a doctor through rose-tinted glasses since the reality of being a medical professional differed wildly from my perceptions. The dozens of biology textbooks I had read had not prepared me for a single drop of blood, as seeing just one could send me into an exhausting realm of dizziness. With every additional day of volunteering, it became painfully clear – I could not follow in my father’s footsteps. 

Disappointed, I began contemplating what made my experience in the hospital so bad and if anything could be done to improve people’s – whether patients’, doctors’, or volunteers’ like myself – experience. Then, a light-bulb switched on: what if I could improve the look of the hospital? As it stood, the hospital was incredibly run-down and inspired depression rather than hope. 

With a goal to improve the hospital’s appearance and thus create a friendlier environment for the people inside, I started the Better Setting – Better Getting project, which was going to decorate the hospital with photographs of nature. Having done so, there was a question of financing ー with the hospital administration over-budget, I had to source the funding entirely from the private sector. It was challenging but, a few dozen cold-calls and a handful of live-pitches later, I found a corporate partner that recognised my vision. Finally, I was ready to make my goal a reality. Legal roadblocks and printing nuances still stood in the way, but, with the enthusiastic support of the hospital community, I was able to navigate my way through. Today, dozens of wall-sized nature photos emit joy and hope into the halls of the hospital. 

My hospital volunteering, which had begun with heartbreak and disillusion, turned out to be a defining experience of self-discovery. It helped me close my chapter on medicine, a chapter I had so often doubted, and helped me validate my passion for leadership; it allowed me to operate free of doubt, knowing that I don’t have to follow my father’s footsteps. Above all, it made me realise that, although I would never be a doctor, I could nonetheless have a positive impact on society in my very own way.

What the Essay Did Well

The author begins with a quote from a historical fiction novel that the author has read. Although their essay topic doesn’t tie directly in with the novel’s plot, the quote they chose is profound and serves as a hook that piques the reader’s interest about the essay subject. 

The author starts the essay by mentioning their father. Their use of first person and writing style makes their first lines seem like the narration at the beginning of a film. This introduction draws the reader in as it seems like the author is building up to something. Similarly, your introduction should start as if you are telling a story to provide the most engaging experience for the reader. 

The author then delves more into their father’s background and describes his medical prowess by showing, rather than telling, readers about it. Instead of saying that his father is exceptional, the author presents a specific detail about how he was the first in his family to attend university. Phrasing your writing like this allows the reader to infer through descriptive detail rather than simply absorbing your words at face value. Ensuring that you create this immersive writing style might take more time, but it is worth it as it will make your essay more memorable to admissions officers.

Eventually, the third-to-last paragraph is the climactic point the reader has been waiting for. It is the most important part of the essay ー it’s time for the author to describe how they grew from the incident. During this portion of your essay, you should take readers through your thought process as you begin to formulate a solution for your conflict. It is not enough to say that you learned something new or to merely state that you felt like a changed person. You must provide concrete examples of how you reached a solution and what that solution entailed. Here, the author mentions their distaste for the hospital, specifically, its aesthetic. This sets readers up to hear their solution. 

In the next paragraph, the author describes how they resolved part of their issues with the hospital and were able to grow into their new career path. When detailing your solution, make sure you are centering yourself as the agent of change and give specific details as to your specific impact in your environment. In this essay, the author doesn’t just say “I learned that I had a passion for business.” Rather, they show readers how their skills developed and mention specific steps they took, like live pitching and navigating legal roadblocks. 

The author concludes this essay by summarizing their journey and bringing their essay back to their chosen quote. By wrapping up their essay in this manner, they underscore their growth in a way that flows well and is easy to read. Furthermore, their open-ended, future-facing final thoughts demonstrate that they intend to continue growing. This inclusion is a key part of any good essay; ending your essay on a strong, future-facing note evokes confidence and illustrates a readiness for the challenges that come with college and beyond.

What Could Be Improved

One area of improvement for this essay is that the section on their transformation is relatively brief. The author spends multiple paragraphs giving context but only dedicates one to the actions behind their growth. The author might want to trim other areas of the essay in order to fully develop this paragraph. They could describe what they did more thoroughly, and really delve into the steps they took to carry out the mentioned processes like so:

Essay Example #2

Prompt: Why are you interested in the major you indicated as your first-choice major?

I woke up. The curtains filtered the sun rays, hitting my face directly. I got up, looked from the bathroom to the kitchen, but my dad wasn’t there. I plopped on the couch, then the door opened. My dad walked in, clutching a brown paper bag with ninety-nine cent breakfast tacos. After eating, we drove to a customer’s house. He sat me in a chair, lifted the floorboard, and crawled under the house to fix the pipes. As he emerged, he talked, but my mind drifted to the weight of the eleven-millimeter hex wrench in my hand. My interest in mechanical engineering originates from my dad, who was a plumber. When I was fifteen, my dad passed away from cancer that constricted his throat. Holding his calloused hand on his deathbed, I wanted to prevent the suffering of others from cancer. Two years later, when I was given a topic of choice for my chemistry research paper, I stumbled upon an article about gold nanoparticles used for HIV treatment. I decided to steer the topic of gold nanoparticles used for cancer treatment instead, entering the field of nanotechnology. After reading numerous articles and watching college lectures on YouTube, I was utterly captivated by topics like using miniscule devices to induce hyperthermia as a safe method of cancer treatment. Nanotechnology is multi-disciplinary, reinforcing my interest in pursuing mechanical engineering as a gateway to participate in nanoscience and nanotechnology research at the University of Texas at Austin. I have learned that nanotechnology is not limited to stories like mine, but to other issues such as sustainable energy and water development that I hope to work towards. It is important for me to continue helping others without forfeiting my interest in nanotechnology, working in collaboration with both engineering and the medical field.

The introduction of this essay stands out for its narrative style. The first sentences only give hints of the story to come, which builds intrigue and keeps the reader engaged. The introduction transitions seamlessly into a vivid, personal story that shows where the author’s academic interests come from. Using a short anecdote like the one in this essay is the most effective way to explain your major choice.

The author then guides readers through their intellectual journey of discovering their academic passions. They demonstrate their passion by discussing specific details about cancer treatments and nanotechnology. Indeed, “nerding out” over your intellectual interests is an excellent way to prove that you are highly motivated to learn about them in college.

Lastly, the end of the essay looks forward to the future. We learn that the author’s dream is to cure cancer, and they want to do it by gaining multidisciplinary knowledge about engineering and medicine. We learn too that UT Austin is a part of the author’s vision. They show their interest in the school by discussing more than the major they want to pursue at UT Austin, highlighting research and the opportunity to explore new applications of nanotechnology.

The main area for improvement in this essay is its formatting. While formatting is far less important than the content of an essay, it can do much more than you would think to make your essay more impactful. This essay only needs one formatting change — paragraph spacing. Here is an example of the improvements:

I woke up. 

The curtains filtered the sun rays, hitting my face directly. I got up, looked from the bathroom to the kitchen, but my dad wasn’t there. I plopped on the couch, then the door opened. My dad walked in, clutching a brown paper bag with ninety-nine cent breakfast tacos. 

After eating, we drove to a customer’s house. He sat me in a chair, lifted the floorboard, and crawled under the house to fix the pipes. As he emerged, he talked, but my mind drifted to the weight of the eleven-millimeter hex wrench in my hand. 

My interest in mechanical engineering originates from my dad, who was a plumber. When I was fifteen, my dad passed away from cancer that constricted his throat. Holding his calloused hand on his deathbed, I wanted to prevent the suffering of others from cancer. 

Two years later, when I was given a topic of choice for my chemistry research paper, I stumbled upon an article about gold nanoparticles used for HIV treatment. I decided to steer the topic of gold nanoparticles used for cancer treatment instead, entering the field of nanotechnology. After reading numerous articles and watching college lectures on YouTube, I was utterly captivated by topics like using miniscule devices to induce hyperthermia as a safe method of cancer treatment. 

Nanotechnology is multi-disciplinary, reinforcing my interest in pursuing mechanical engineering as a gateway to participate in nanoscience and nanotechnology research at the University of Texas at Austin. I have learned that nanotechnology is not limited to stories like mine, but to other issues such as sustainable energy and water development that I hope to work towards. 

It is important for me to continue helping others without forfeiting my interest in nanotechnology, working in collaboration with both engineering and the medical field.

This new paragraph spacing makes the essay much easier to read. Separating certain parts into paragraphs puts powerful emphasis on the ideas that need them; for example, turning the sentence “I woke up” into its own paragraph creates a captivating hook that intrigues readers into finding out what happens next.

With the new format, it is also easier to see that the fourth paragraph would benefit from a few transitional phrases. To connect the author’s interests in mechanical engineering and cancer solutions, the paragraph could be reworded like so: 

My interest in mechanical engineering originates from my dad, who was a plumber. My interest in finding solutions to cancer — and how mechanical engineering could create them — comes from my dad too. When I was fifteen, he passed away from cancer that constricted his throat. Holding his calloused hand on his deathbed, I wanted to prevent the suffering of others from cancer. 

Where to Get Your UT Austin Essays Edited

Do you want feedback on your UT Austin essays? After rereading your essays countless times, it can be difficult to evaluate your writing objectively. That’s why we created our free Peer Essay Review tool , where you can get a free review of your essay from another student. You can also improve your own writing skills by reviewing other students’ essays.

If you want a college admissions expert to review your essay, advisors on CollegeVine have helped students refine their writing and submit successful applications to top schools. In fact,  Alexander Oddo , an essay expert on CollegeVine, provided commentary on the essays in this post. Find the right advisor for you to improve your chances of getting into your dream school!

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

transfer essay example ut

Transfer Admission

You can apply for transfer admission if:

  • You have already started studying at another college or university after graduating from high school or earning a GED.
  • You have or will have earned 24 semester hours of required transferable coursework at another college or university. The option to use coursework in progress is not available for spring semester applicants.

Transfer Credit Resources

Required Application Materials Deadline Extension: Summer/Fall 2024

The Common App and ApplyTexas summer/fall application is due March 1 (11:59 p.m. Central). Students may submit all additional application materials until Friday, March 8 (11:59 p.m. Central).

For questions, email [email protected] .

If you are a transfer student who is not a U.S. citizen and who is not a U.S. resident, please visit our International Transfer page.

If you are a current UT Austin student looking to transfer to a different major, please visit our Internal Transfer page.

Key Transfer Admission Dates

Summer/fall enrollment.

  • ApplyTexas Application Opens Aug 1
  • Common App Opens Sep 1
  • Deadline to Apply March 1
  • Admission Decisions Released Mid to Late June

Spring Enrollment

  • ApplyTexas Application Opens March 1
  • Deadline to Apply September 1
  • Admission Decisions Released Mid-December

Required Application Materials

Application.

Transfer applicants can submit an application through ApplyTexas. They can also use the Common App .

Application Fee

Pay the non-refundable $75 application fee when you submit your application. Fee waivers are available. Request a fee waiver when you apply for admission or submit the Request for Fee Waiver form in MyStatus via the Document Upload System.

Along with your application, submit one essay. Applicants to the School of Architecture and Studio Art, Art Education and Art History must submit an additional essay. We recommend submitting your essay in the application. You may also submit the essay using the Document Upload System in MyStatus or by mailing them to the Office of Admissions.

Essays and Short Answers

College Transcripts and/or High School Transcripts

Send official transcripts documenting all coursework you have attempted at any college or university you attended. If you have attended more than one college or university, we’ll need a transcript from each school, even if the credits earned at one school were transferred to another. If you are applying for automatic transfer admission, submit your official high school transcript, as well. We cannot accept transcripts via email.

Transcript Info

Submit your resume offering additional information about your achievements using the Document Upload System in MyStatus. Your resume should include your previous five years of academic, extracurricular, community and work activities as well as honors and awards. You can also include high school accomplishments if they took place within the last five years.

If you submit a resume, you should include:

  • Details about what each activity involved rather than a general description.
  • The number of hours per week and weeks per year spent on each activity.

Review Optional and Additional Materials

Certain majors may require additional materials after you have submitted your application. You may also wish to submit additional materials to strengthen your application, such as letters of recommendation or an expanded resume.

Additional Materials

If applicable, the following materials may be required. All required items must be received by the appropriate deadline.

Major-Specific Items

Certain majors have required prerequisites for transfer applicants. These items can be found on each college and school on our Colleges & Degrees page. Please be sure to review the prerequisites for your first and second choice majors.

Colleges & Degrees

Letters of Recommendation

You can submit up to two letters of recommendation with your application or after you’ve submitted your application. These letters may be from mentors or people who know you well and can include teachers or school counselors, although we encourage you to provide letters from sources outside of your high school. The letter should be able to give additional context or information to support your admission that is not already provided in your application or other submitted documents (resume, transcripts). Letters of recommendation are not required but are encouraged.

Submitting Your Recommendations

We do not accept recommendations via email. Submit your recommendations via:

  • MyStatus using the Document Upload System
  • Parchment or Scoir

Residency Affidavit

You may qualify for residency if you aren’t a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident but have established Texas residency. Both the Common App and ApplyTexas applications will prompt those who indicate they meet these criteria to download the appropriate form. You can submit the affidavit to the address listed on the form.

Residency FAQs

Automatic Transfer Admission Form

Some transfer applicants are able to apply for automatic transfer admission. If you are eligible and would like to apply, complete the Automatic Transfer Admission form. More details about applicability and application instructions can be found on our Appeals page.

Automatic Transfer Admission form

Once you’ve submitted your application, you can track the status and submit additional documents in MyStatus. Be sure to regularly monitor MyStatus until your application is listed as complete and submit any to-do items prior to the deadlines.

Check MyStatus

You may be asked for additional information after you submit your application. Check MyStatus to stay up to date.

Complete the FAFSA/TASFA

Completing the FAFSA/TASFA before January 15 will maximize your eligibility for financial aid awards.

Complete Your Housing Application

You can apply for housing before you receive an admission decision. Housing is offered on a first come, first served basis. We recommend applying as soon as possible.

Check Your Email

We’ll alert you about your admission decision, financial aid awards, housing contract and other important details via email. Check your email regularly.

transfer essay example ut

The 3 Steps To Submitting Your Transfer Application to the University of Texas at Austin

transfer essay example ut

Students decide to transfer colleges for a number of reasons. Whether your student aspires to transfer from a four year institution or community college, if they have their eye on UT-Austin , here are a 3 things to keep in mind:  

1. Establish/Confirm your Eligibility Requirements

Prospective students are classified as transfers for admissions purposes if they’ve both: 

  • Graduated from high school or completed a GED 
  • Earned or will have earned 24 semester hours of required transferable coursework at another college or university (this includes 2 year and community colleges)

Transfer applicants typically have a few college coursework credits under their belt. Before beginning an application, take stock of the transferable credits your student has completed. You can verify if completed coursework credits can be transferred here.  

2. Prepare your Application Materials

In addition to completing an online application for admission through ApplyTexas or the Coalition for College, prospective transfer students must also submit the following application materials: 

  • College Transcripts
  • An Expanded Resume
  • Letter(s) of recommendation 
  • Two Essays 

3. UT-Austin Transfer Essay Topic A

All Transfer Applicants must submit two application essays to UT Austin. 

The first essay, Topic A, is required by all applicants, regardless of major. 

Topic A, also known as a Statement of Purpose should in 500-650 words, address the following prompt: 

The statement of purpose will provide an opportunity to explain any extenuating circumstances that you feel could add value to your application. You may also want to explain unique aspects of your academic background or valued experiences you may have had that relate to your academic discipline. The statement of purpose is not meant to be a listing of accomplishments in high school or a record of your participation in school-related activities. Rather, this is your opportunity to address the admissions committee directly and to let us know more about you as an individual, in a manner that your transcripts and other information cannot convey. 

As your student drafts their Statement of Purpose for Topic A, be sure to address the following: 

  • Your previous academic experiences and development
  • Your current studies
  • Your future academic and professional goals 
  • How a UT education can help you achieve your goals in specific and concrete ways 
  • Any special or extenuating circumstances 

For students transferring from four year colleges: Be sure to stay tasteful and respectful when sharing your reasons for transferring from your current institution! 

Additional Application Essays

In addition to a Statement of Purpose, prospective transfer students are required to submit at least one additional essay addressing Topic C, D or E . Unless applying to a a special program like Architecture or Fine Arts, the majority of transfer applicants’ second essay responds to Topic E:  

Choose an issue of importance to you--it could be personal, school-related, local, political or international in scope--and write an essay in which you explain the significance of that issue to yourself, your family, your community or your generation. 

Students should approach Topic E as an opportunity to demonstrate how they think, write, and communicate ideas that are important to them. Pick an issue that is meaningful to you, not something you think an admissions reader wants to hear. You can use Topic E to highlight your fit-to-major experiences that you touched on in Topic A or use this space to showcase a different side of yourself! 

Click here for more information about UT’s Transfer process.

< Older Post

Newer Post >

transfer essay example ut

This page is licensed under Creative Commons under Attribution 4.0 International . Anyone can share content from this page, with attribution and link to College MatchPoint requested.

" College MatchPoint helps steer and advise you from beginning to end of the college search and application process. They take what can be a very stressful time and break it down into smaller, manageable pieces. Bob, Lisa and their staff support their student clients, enabling them to find the best fit. You can trust that the process will work; it did for all 3 of my very different kids. "

— Ellen Miura

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

Email signup

OUR SERVICES

OUR APPROACH

transfer essay example ut

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED | COLLEGE MATCHPOINT | SITE BY FIX8

transfer essay example ut

Read 2 Transfer Student Essays That Worked

Strong transfer essays can help pave the way to admissions offers.

Read 2 Transfer Essays That Worked

transfer essay example ut

Getty Images

Though it isn't a golden ticket, a strong transfer essay may boost an applicant's odds of admission.

There are as many reasons to transfer colleges as there are transfer students. But regardless of why someone wants to move to a new institution, the process for doing so usually requires an admissions essay.

Colleges With the Most Transfer Students

Josh Moody Jan. 28, 2020

transfer essay example ut

In a 2018 National Association for College Admission Counseling survey , 41.5% of colleges polled said a transfer applicant's essay or writing sample is of either considerable or moderate importance in the admission decision.

A compelling, well-written transfer essay doesn't guarantee acceptance – many other factors are at play, such as an applicant's GPA. However, a strong essay can be a factor that helps move the odds in the applicant's favor, says Kathy Phillips, associate dean of undergraduate admissions at Duke University in North Carolina.

Know What Colleges Are Looking For In a Transfer Essay

Some schools have prospective transfer students use the Common App or the Coalition Application to apply. In addition to the main essay, students may be required to submit a second writing sample or respond to short-answer questions, though this isn't always the case. Prospective students can check a college's website for specific guidance regarding how to apply.

Whatever application method they use, prospective students should be aware that writing a transfer essay is not the same as writing a first-year college application essay, experts advise. First-year essays are more open-ended, says Niki Barron, associate dean of admission at Hamilton College in New York. When applying as first-years, prospective students can generally write about any experience, relationship or goal that has shaped who they are as people, she says.

This contrasts with transfer essays, where the focus is typically narrower. Barron says she thinks of transfer essays as more of a statement of purpose. "We're really looking to see students' reasons for wanting to transfer," she says.

Katie Fretwell, the recently retired dean of admission and financial aid at Amherst College in Massachusetts, says prospective transfer students are in a position to be a bit more reflective about their educational goals because of their additional year or years of experience post-high school. The essay helps admissions officers get a sense of whether an applicant has done "an appropriate level of soul-searching about the match," she says.

Transfer Essay Examples

Below are two transfer essays that helped students get into Duke and Amherst, respectively. Both institutions are very selective in transfer admissions. For fall 2018, Duke had a transfer acceptance rate of 8% and Amherst accepted 4% of its transfer applicants, according to U.S. News data.

Hover over the circles to read what made these essays stand out to admissions experts.

transfer essay example ut

Searching for a college? Get our complete rankings of Best Colleges.

Tags: education , colleges , college applications , students , transfer students , college admissions

2024 Best Colleges

transfer essay example ut

Search for your perfect fit with the U.S. News rankings of colleges and universities.

College Admissions: Get a Step Ahead!

Sign up to receive the latest updates from U.S. News & World Report and our trusted partners and sponsors. By clicking submit, you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions & Privacy Policy .

Ask an Alum: Making the Most Out of College

You May Also Like

Protests boil over on college campuses.

Lauren Camera April 22, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Supporting Low-Income College Applicants

Shavar Jeffries April 16, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Supporting Black Women in Higher Ed

Zainab Okolo April 15, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Law Schools With the Highest LSATs

Ilana Kowarski and Cole Claybourn April 11, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Today NAIA, Tomorrow Title IX?

Lauren Camera April 9, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Grad School Housing Options

Anayat Durrani April 9, 2024

transfer essay example ut

How to Decide if an MBA Is Worth it

Sarah Wood March 27, 2024

transfer essay example ut

What to Wear to a Graduation

LaMont Jones, Jr. March 27, 2024

transfer essay example ut

FAFSA Delays Alarm Families, Colleges

Sarah Wood March 25, 2024

transfer essay example ut

Help Your Teen With the College Decision

Anayat Durrani March 25, 2024

transfer essay example ut

College Reality Check

College Reality Check

How to Write Best College Transfer Essay: Secrets, Tips and Tricks

Al Abdukadirov

If the college you wish to transfer to is asking for a transfer essay, you can rest assured that it’s something that can have a considerable impact on the admissions decision.

As a matter of fact, you should consider submitting one even if it’s optional — it can work to your advantage should admissions officers compare you with another applicant with similar qualifications.

Since it’s not uncommon for the acceptance rates for transfer applicants to be lower than the acceptance rates for freshmen applicants, writing a winning one can help you win an acceptance letter.

How to Start a College Transfer Essay

Because it’s the very first thing that admissions officers will read, the introduction of a college transfer essay is an opportunity for the transfer applicant to stand out from other applicants.

While there are many ways to start a college essay, only a few of them can deliver each time.

Let’s take a look at some of the most commonly used opening techniques that never fail to engage admissions officers, thus making the task of getting to know you through your college transfer essay an enjoyable endeavor:

writing college transfer essay

Open with an attention-grabbing sentence

The goal is to make admissions officers want to read the entirety of your transfer essay from the get-go. And that is why you should start yours with something that can get them hooked and curious enough right away.

Here are some examples of successful good openings from winning college essays submitted to Stanford:

  • I have old hands.
  • When I was in the eighth grade I couldn’t read.
  • I change my name each time I place an order at Starbucks.

Describe a moment without revealing much

Opening with an image-based description of a particular moment without explaining much gives the audience, the admissions officers, a sense that something important is happening, the full significance of which is yet to be revealed, which is why it can keep them from wanting to grab another college essay to check out.

The following is an example of a great college transfer essay that takes advantage of this effective opening technique:

Bowing down to the porcelain god, I emptied the contents of my stomach. Foaming at the mouth, I was ready to pass out. My body couldn’t stop shaking as I gasped for air, and the room started spinning.

Create an expectation and then give a twist

Nothing can surprise admissions officers more than reading a bunch of sequential sentences establishing things that create a certain expectation by the readers only to take them in a different direction entirely.

Check out this college essay’s opening that leverages the twist approach to its full advantage:

I am on Oxford Academy’s Speech and Debate Team, in both the Parliamentary Debate division and the Lincoln-Douglas debate division. I write screenplays, short stories and opinionated blogs and am a regular contributor to my school’s literary magazine, The Glue Stick. I have accumulated over 300 community service hours that include work at homeless shelters, libraries and special education youth camps. I have been evaluated by the College Board and have placed within the top percentile. But I am not any of these things. I am not a test score, nor a debater, nor a writer. I am an anti-nihilist punk rock philosopher.

What to Write About in the Transfer Essay

The things to talk about in one’s college transfer essay depend on the prompt chosen. But generally speaking, it’s a good idea for transfer applicants to focus more on their postsecondary experience thus far.

And because the essay is for transfer admissions purposes, it’s also recommended to discuss future goals at the target institution.

It’s the body that’s the longest part of a college essay. As a result of this, as the word limit permits, the transfer applicant has plenty of room to demonstrate his or her creativity and writing skills as well as reasons for switching colleges.

However, it’s a must that the right matter is discussed in the main part of the transfer essay.

There’s something transfer applicants have that first-time, first-year applicants don’t: a higher education experience.

As such, it’s just suitable and necessary for them to talk about theirs in their college transfer essay.

After all, when reviewing transfer applications, admissions officers want to get to know how much applicants have grown since high school.

Generally speaking, the following are some of the most fitting things to write about when asked to submit a transfer essay — most college essay prompts, anyway, ask transfer applicants to discuss them:

  • How you have grown from attending your current school
  • What your specific goals are at your new school

How to Conclude Your Writing

Depending on the approach or method of choice, a college transfer essay can be concluded in a number of ways. For instance, the students may return to the beginning or look forward.

Ending on an action or revealing the main point, if not disclosed in the introduction and main body as a part of the preferred style, are also options for closing one’s college transfer essay.

In some instances, it’s a much better idea to know the things to avoid at all costs as far as putting your transfer essay to an end. The general consensus is that the following are some bad ones:

  • Summarizing the essay
  • Stating the point of the essay even if it’s obvious
  • Opening the ending with cliché transitions
  • Extending the desire to get accepted to the college

college transfer

Tips for Writing the Best Transfer Essay

It’s important for admissions officers to know you beyond your GPA from your current college and test scores, which are required by many colleges and universities for transfer applicants to submit.

And that is why a transfer application essay is commonly a required material to include in one’s application other than the Common App or Coalition App essay.

Here’s a rundown of some dos and don’ts when it comes to writing a transfer essay so that you will find it even easier to remember the things to do to strengthen it and the things to avoid that can lower your admissions chances:

  • Do focus on what you have learned. Talk about what you have discovered about yourself and what you want in life as a result of your experience at your current college. Needless to say, you should consider discussing the changes in your academic and professional goals that your college experience thus far has caused.
  • Do point out the reasons for wanting to continue at another school. Of course, admissions officers at the college you are applying to would like to know why you want to switch schools. Remember to provide clear objectives and plans so that the school can have an idea of whether or not it could serve your needs better than your current institution.
  • Do mention the things you like about the new college. Demonstrated interest is not considered in the admissions process at many institutions. Still, a college would be interested to know what about it that you like. Is it the academic program? How about the research opportunities available? Or is it the summer internships offered?

Don’ts

  • Don’t bad mouth your current school. Avoid using your transfer essay as a platform for whining, enumerating everything you hate about the institution you are attending currently. However, there is nothing wrong in pointing out the obvious, as you will later find out in a couple of examples of successful transfer essays — so keep reading!
  • Don’t use your current school as an excuse for having bad grades. While it’s true that a terrible program, campus culture or roommate can affect your academic performance negatively, there’s always a workaround for a determined and hardworking student. You don’t want the college you are eyeing to suspect that you are lazy.
  • Don’t waste precious word count. Always keep in mind that it’s not just your transfer essay that the admissions officer at the college you are applying to will check out — they will, of course, also take a look at the rest of your application. To let them know you more, consider talking about things that are nowhere to be found in your Common App.

What Colleges are Looking for in Transfer Essays

According to the associate dean of admission at Hamilton College in New York colleges and universities are looking for the reasons why transfer applicants want to transfer .

She added that transfer essays are nothing like first-year essays that are more open-ended for the lack of the students’ postsecondary education experience.

True enough, a retired dean of admission and financial aid at Amherst College said that — still as a part of the same report — transferees should be more reflective about their educational goals due to their experience after high school.

Of course, different institutions have different prompts for transfer essays.

Most of them, however, want to see the very same things. And spearheading the short list is the transfer applicant’s future goals, both academically and professionally, and how transferring to the school can help in the achievement of those.

It goes without saying that the transfer applicant should be certain that the new school is a better fit for him or her than the current school. Being able to provide specific examples of why he or she deserves to be a part of the campus is also expected.

Otherwise, it’s not unlikely for the admissions officers to give any available spot to a more deserving transferee.

And to conclude this part of the post, here’s a 6-minute video of a college admissions reader talking about everything that any transfer applicant needs to include in his or her college transfer essay.

Two Transfer Essay Examples

It’s one thing to know how to write a good college transfer essay. But it’s another thing to know what a good college transfer essay looks like. And that is why in this part of this post I will give you a couple of examples of successful transfer essays, the kinds that won transfer applicants a much-coveted acceptance letter from their top-choice schools.

This first example is a transfer essay submitted to the University of Pennsylvania, in response to a prompt asking the applicant to state the reasons for transferring and the objectives he or she hopes to achieve using a minimum of 250 words:

My reasons for transferring are two-fold and equally important. Academics and campus life are arguably the most vital components of the college experience and these two areas at [current school] have been unsatisfying for me. My unhappiness at [current school] is rooted in the difference between my academic philosophy and [current school’s]. Based on my experience in class I feel like the educational emphasis at [current school] is on knowing and not learning. An example of this comes from my philosophy class in which one of the teacher’s most common responses to a question is, “let’s bracket that for now,” when the inquiry is not about something printed on the syllabus for that day. To me, this sort of teaching discourages curiosity and in a philosophy class, especially, a deeper discussion that strays from the lesson plan is what gives the class its significant and educational value. The process of learning is pared down to its most straightforward and austere so that the state of knowing can be achieved as soon as possible.

What I hope to get out of transferring is to find a school that fits my academic philosophy and believes that learning for the sake of learning is vital to a healthy education. My favorite part about classes is taking a long, winding, side-note-packed path on the way to knowing, and if we never get there it doesn’t matter because knowing isn’t the point of learning — learning is the point of learning.

As for campus life, the prevailing campus social culture has been disappointing to me. No one ever seems to tire of doing the same thing week after week and the students admit that none of the events they attend would be fun without alcohol. I prefer an environment where the sober experiences trump the drunken ones. The ongoing joke about extracurricular life is that all of the clubs and organizations are “drinking club with debate” or “drinking club with community service” and so in this manner. The students do their work so they can go out at night as opposed to doing their homework to learn something. The prevailing culture sets the tone for the whole school and creates an uninspired environment. I’d like to go to a school where the spirit is less unimaginative and more intellectually ambitious.

Both my academic and cultural concerns center on differing philosophies. The academic approach at [current school] is too pragmatic, especially given that I am a classics major, and the social life is too alcohol-centered for my liking. I’m aware that all college campuses have drinking and it is a part of college life, but I’m looking to transfer to a school where drinking is more a means to an end of socializing than an end in itself.

student finishing college essay

And now, this second example of a transfer essay submitted to the University of Texas at Austin was a response to a long prompt that basically ask applicants to talk about their current studies and future academic and professional goals:

I stood still, lost amidst a sea of towering figures. I felt the familiarity of being alone. Each time I change environments, it doesn’t come any easier. A broad-shouldered girl in a blue shirt asked accusingly me where I needed to be. Despite intimidating me at first, she turned out to be sweet and concerned for my well-being.

She took me to my classroom and introduced me to the other girls. They all seemed so different from me. My family left the United States when I was young, and during my ten years spent in India, I switched between three very different schools.

Accustomed to American schools that are relatively orderly and organized, it took time to adjust to India’s disorderly schools. Just as I started feeling comfortable with the unusual teaching methods of my new school, my parents transferred me to a more “cultural” school. With a total of seven students in the entire school, we learned in literal shacks.

My classmates were behind in their education and far below my grade level, so the teachers focused most of their time on them. I suffered greatly when I switched back into mainstream schooling. Now, it was my classmates who raced through their work. I was thrown, unprepared, into India’s rigorous education system. I struggled with constructing angles and balancing chemical equations. I had to work especially hard to make up for the time lost at my cultural school.

I made it through Tenth grade with extensive additional coaching. Despite my setback, I knew that I could do better. Through my classes, I began to develop an interest with the mathematical functions that power finance and accounting. My accounting teacher became my biggest inspiration. The way she related accounting procedures to current business crises convinced me to learn more. I started keeping up with companies’ corporate strategies and their effect on the economy.

Before my board exams, I completed additional work on my own and solved about 70 papers in preparation. The work ethic I acquired under her guidance is something that has stuck to me through the challenging times at community college. I continue to self-study with online courses offered on Khan Academy to further exceed expectations.

Additionally, my internship at the Pratham International School in the summer of 2016 gave me real-world experience with auditing and organizing financials. I applied my classroom and self-studying knowledge to help with vendor payment methods and profitable tuition pricing.

I also pursued an internship in the accounting department of The Home Depot. For the first time, I saw theoretical concepts come to life as I helped facilitate vendor payment methods and profitable product pricing. The chance to interact with higher-level financial managers gave me exposure to strategic decision-making and contingency planning.

I look forward to pursuing another internship and taking advantage of the connections provided by the McCombs School of Business. I hope the university will help connect me with fruitful opportunities to develop my business competencies. By participating in the Texas Stock Team and The University Finance Association, I can explore different interests and develop my network. I don’t have these opportunities at Houston Community College, and I don’t think any Texas university offers the unparalleled opportunities of UT. Doing research under award-winning professors like Laura Starks and Robert Parrino will give me a head start in the industry.

Like The University of Texas, I also want to transform myself and change the world. The past few months at Houston Community College have helped me realize that I need an environment with a limitless ceiling for growth. Since I have experienced many different educational environments, I have a good idea for what I seek while avoiding opportunities that may not be in my best interest. I bring a different perspective that will contribute to classroom discussions and be a valued addition to the McCombs community.

College Transfer FAQs

Before this post comes to an end, let’s answer some pressing questions many transfer applicants who are in the process of brainstorming for their college essay feel too embarrassed to ask:

Do all colleges require a transfer essay?

Not all institutions of higher education make a transfer essay a part of the admissions process for transfer applicants. However, many colleges do, including some of the most selective ones.

Some require transfer applicants to answer just a single prompt, while others oblige them to answer multiple prompts. Most prompts call for an explanation for wanting to attend the school.

Can you use a common topic for your transfer essay?

Admissions officers do not expect all transfer applicants to talk about never-before-seen topics in their college transfer essays.

Even a common topic can become fresh and exciting if the student discusses it from a unique perspective or gives it a surprising story arc. Needless to say, using an advanced or creative writing style can make any everyday topic new and exciting.

How do you cite sources in a transfer essay?

Compared to research and academic writing, a college essay, whether by a first-year applicant or a transferee applicant, is less formal. As such, using an established style of citing sources and providing a reference list is unnecessary.

The transfer applicant may instead cite sources casually in the essay, in practically any part where it will not disrupt the flow of thoughts.

How do you meet the word count limit?

Going past the word limit necessitates going over the transfer essay to eliminate any irrelevant details. Since brevity is an important component of a written piece, unnecessary words that clutter the submission should be removed, too.

On the other hand, sharing stories, feelings and insight by vividly describing them is a solution when struggling to reach the minimum word count.

What is a diversity essay?

A diversity essay is a supplementary essay some institutions of higher education or scholarships require that is focused on the unique identity, background, culture, beliefs or characteristics of the college applicant.

In most instances, a diversity essay is asked to be submitted as part of the admissions process where diversity is believed to be enriching for the campus community.

Recap: How to Write a Winning College Transfer Essay

In most instances, transfer applicants need to include a transfer essay in their application. There are recommended ways to open and close a transfer essay, such as the ones we talked about in this post, which can help increase one’s admissions chances — since transfer acceptance rates are generally lower, they need to ace every part of their application.

Transfer students, typically, have to talk about their experiences with their current school and their goals at the new school, which are things that admissions officers look for other than writing skill and creativity.

Take your time when writing your transfer essay because it’s an important component of your application.

Al Abdukadirov

Independent Education Consultant, Editor-in-chief. I have a graduate degree in Electrical Engineering and training in College Counseling. Member of American School Counselor Association (ASCA).

Similar Posts

Comprehensive Guide to Transfer to NYU as a Student

Comprehensive Guide to Transfer to NYU as a Student

Can a Good College Essay Get You Into Your Dream College?

Can a Good College Essay Get You Into Your Dream College?

Master the Art of Introductions: How to Start a Compelling Essay About Yourself

Master the Art of Introductions: How to Start a Compelling Essay About Yourself

How to Transfer to UCLA in 5 Steps

How to Transfer to UCLA in 5 Steps

How to Close a College Essay (With 10 Examples)

How to Close a College Essay (With 10 Examples)

Unlocking the Hidden Power of Supplemental Essays

Unlocking the Hidden Power of Supplemental Essays

transfer essay example ut

How to Write a College Transfer Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide

Student in colorful sweater writing his college transfer essay with a blue pen on a desk

Reviewed by:

Rohan Jotwani

Former Admissions Committee Member, Columbia University

Reviewed: 10/05/23

If you’re considering switching colleges and want to learn how to write a college transfer essay, read on.

Student typing college transfer essay on laptop

There are multiple reasons to transfer colleges: you weren’t able to get into your top choice in your first round of applications, you want to change your major , or maybe you just have the world’s worst roommate. 

Whatever your reason may be, you should know the transfer process can be lengthy and will differ from your original college applications. For instance, now that you’ve completed some postsecondary education, your undergrad grades will be considered more than your high school GPA. 

Additionally, you’ll have to write a college transfer essay to introduce yourself to the committee and explain why you’d like to join their school. This essay tends to be the hardest part of transfer applications. 

If you’re unsure of where to begin or how to write a successful college transfer essay, this guide has got you covered!

How to Write a College Transfer Essay

Here is a breakdown of how to write an impressive college transfer essay.:

How to Start the Transfer Essay

Your introduction is arguably the most important part of your essay because it’s the first paragraph the committee will read. Accordingly, it has to be intriguing enough to urge them to continue reading. 

Many students start their essays with a statement or story related to their reason for transferring. A safe way to begin your essay is to share a specific principle you have about education that is rooted in an authentic experience.

Maybe you’ve always valued hands-on learning and have a famous story about taking apart your dad’s favorite replica aircraft and putting it back together to learn how it works.

Or, maybe you had a sick relative whose experience in and out of the hospital made you appreciate scientific experimentation and discovery, leading you to pursue medicine at a research-intensive school. 

Regardless of your educational principles, ensure you use a memorable experience to share it. Immerse the readers into your narrative so they feel more connected to you and your words! Here are some tips to keep in mind when writing your introduction:

Reconsider Using Famous Quotes 

While there have been successful college transfer essays that used quotes as their opening line, you should avoid overused quotes. If you’re beginning your essay with the phrase “knowledge is power,” it’s time to revisit your list of motivational quotes. 

If you’re set on opening your essay with a quote, choose one the committee hasn’t heard before and think outside the box! You could choose a quote from your favorite book, a show, or a movie. An even better way to ensure you use a unique opening is to quote a family member or friend! 

Maybe your mother always told you to stand up for yourself and that “if someone hits you, you hit them right back!” This seemingly unrelated quote could be used to explain how you’ve always been your biggest self-advocate and fight hard to have what you want, including a high-quality education. 

Forget the Theatrics

You don’t have to choose a story with a nail-biting hook or dramatic ending. Your story doesn’t need to involve a near-death epitome, a tragic loss, or a heroic save. Keep it simple! 

By that same token, don’t use exaggerated or false stories just to prove a point. The admissions committee will see through this and will dock you points for being ingenuine. 

Explain Why You Chose Your Current School

Once you’ve written an attention-grabbing introduction, the next step is to explain why you chose your current school. Perhaps the school boasted its Socratic teaching method that allows students to take charge of their education. Or, it offered a program of specific interest to you. Maybe you chose it simply because it’s one of the top colleges to transfer to .  

Regardless of your reasons, you must include them in your essay to explain how your expectations were not met. This part should be fact-focused. Be succinct and list the reasons you chose your current school over others.

Explain the Reasons You Want to Transfer

Once you’ve recounted the reasons you chose your current school, think about the reasons you decided to leave it. A large part of learning the art of essay writing is knowing what not to say! While you want to remain honest, your answer should revolve around the education you received at your school.

Here are some questions to ask yourself as you write this part of your essay:

  • Did your program/institution live up to all of your expectations?
  • Did you receive the education and support you hoped for?
  • Were there enough opportunities for intellectual, personal, and professional growth?
  • Are you closer to achieving your career goals after attending your current school?
  • What’s missing from your education? What makes you hesitant to stay at your current school?
  • Have your career plans changed? Can your current school offer you the resources you need to pursue this new path?

Even if you’re transferring because your roommate never washes the dishes or you’re trying to escape a clingy ex, the admissions committee won’t be interested or amused by these reasons. 

Focus on the positives of your school but explain how they fell short. Perhaps the Socratic teaching method you hoped for fell short of equal dialogue and was more of a typical lecture. Maybe you had a eureka moment in an elective that made you want to switch to a program your current school doesn’t offer.

On the other hand, your current school may have already fulfilled the role it was meant to play. For instance, you may have chosen your current school to stay close to home and care for a sick family member or to take general courses to boost your GPA. 

Explain how these goals were fulfilled and how you’d like to move on to the next stage of your education. No matter what your reasons for transferring are, you’ll need to provide concrete examples to support your claims. Share specific experiences that led to your decision to transfer schools.

This part of your college transfer essay can be tricky. You’ll want to provide concrete examples of how your current school fails to meet your expectations without badmouthing it. To find this balance, avoid making these mistakes:

Placing Blame

Don’t blame your current school for failing to meet your expectations. 

Explaining how the professors were monotonous robots with no enthusiasm for teaching or that the class sizes were far too big to feel connected to your mentors will make you seem too critical. 

You want to phrase your issues in a way that still sheds a positive light on their curriculum and community. In essence, you want to follow a “it’s not you, it’s me” type of explanation! You should explain how your current university offers great resources but not the best ones for your personal aspirations. 

Throwing In the Towel

You should also mention the ways you tried to make the best of your situation at your current school. Even though you ultimately realized your school couldn’t offer you the education or resources you need, you should demonstrate your determination to make it work. 

If your main issue was the lack of connection between you and your professors, you could share how you attended office hours regularly to have more one-on-one conversations. Demonstrate you tried to remedy your issues before deciding to transfer. This will show maturity, perseverance, and adaptability!

Explain Your Academic and Career Goals

This next part of your essay should be tied to what you’ve said previously. Think about your academic goals and what your plans are for the future. 

Here are some questions to guide this part of your essay:

  • Where do you hope your education takes you? 
  • What will your education be used for? 
  • What grades do you hope to receive? 
  • What program will help you achieve your career goals?
  • What kind of mentors do you believe will help you achieve your academic and career goals?
  • What school-based extracurriculars will aid you in your aspirations?

Use these questions to figure out what your specific academic and career goals are. 

Explain Why You Want to Attend the Transfer College

Using the ideas you brainstormed from the previous sections, you want to focus your attention on explaining how your academic and career goals will be best met through your transfer college. 

Research your transfer college well and provide specific reasons explaining why you want to attend. Go deeper than simply retelling the school’s main values, and explain why you’re choosing it in detail. 

Focus on the type of education it provides, the school community and environment, and unique educational offerings, such as a particular program, teaching method, or experiential learning opportunities.

This part of your essay should be tailored specifically to your transfer college. If you can plug in any college name and use the same essay, you’ll need to add more details and continue working on it. 

Take Responsibility for Any Hiccups

Another factor to consider is taking responsibility for any shortcomings. If you’re transferring colleges and have low grades or otherwise unfavorable aspects on your application, you should hold yourself accountable in your essay.

Do not blame your current school for your low grades. Even if you had a poor experience that made it difficult to excel, your grades are ultimately your responsibility. Explain how you will improve in your transfer school and the steps you’ve taken to become a stronger student. 

Focus on Reflection

Your college transfer essay is essentially a reflection on your university experience and goals. This helps narrow things down and ensure you don’t choose a taboo essay topic . Just keep it simple and truthful by sharing your academic journey and why it’s brought you to where you are today.

As important as it is to share your next steps and eagerness to join your transfer school, it’s equally as important to reflect on the present and past. 

You should reflect on your own educational principles, your reasons for attending your current school, the ups and downs that influenced you to transfer, and finally, how your transfer school will assist you in the next stage of your educational journey.

Keep It Casual

Your transfer statement isn’t your typical structured, formal three-body paragraph essay. Keep it casual, and don’t be afraid to use contractions or more colloquial language. 

While you, of course, want to avoid using slang or distasteful language, you should let your personality shine through and give your essay a more conversational feel. 

The admissions committee should feel like they’re getting to know more about your essence and values, not just your impeccable writing skills—although those are essential to demonstrate too!

Have Clear Intentions

Admissions committees will appreciate if you can demonstrate clear direction and intention in your essay. Provide specific examples of what you need your university to provide to help you reach your goals and how these needs are not being met currently.

Demonstrate Your Growth

Your university experience should offer you more insight and perspective on education. Share this perspective in your essay and prove you are a mature and insightful student. 

A good indicator of maturity is speaking positively about your current school despite its limitations. You should portray both an eagerness to pursue other options and an appreciation for your current university. In other words, you should prove that while your current school isn’t the best fit for you, it’s still an excellent school!

Make it Personal

We’ve said it multiple times, and we’re saying it one last time in hopes you won’t forget. Use as many concrete examples as you can throughout your essay. Do not rely on any vague aspirations or reasons for transferring. 

Go deeper than simply wanting a higher quality education! What made your current school’s education unsatisfactory? What experiences led to the conclusion that you needed more? How can your transfer school fill in this gap? 

Keep in mind that this advice also applies to a transfer applicant’s personal statement. The overall goal is to be as genuine as possible while staying true to your goal - communicating your desire to attend the college. 

Edit Multiple Times

You may have great ideas and an excellent story to tell in your essay, but having poor grammar or spelling errors will reduce your essay’s effectiveness.

Ensure you edit your essay multiple times before submitting it. Take time between your editing sessions so you can look at it with fresh eyes each time. You’re more likely to catch errors this way!

How to Conclude the Transfer Essay

Overlooking the conclusion of your essay can make what would be an amazing essay a good essay. Considering schools are highly selective with transfer applications , especially Ivy League schools , a good essay is unlikely to win you any points with the admissions committee. 

Imagine your essay as a circle. To complete the circle, your final paragraph should reiterate the themes and principles mentioned in your introduction. Revisit the story you shared and reflect on the educational principle that guided your essay. 

Briefly reiterate what type of education you could receive at your current school—a great but ultimately unsuitable one—and mention the better-suited education you’d receive at your transfer school. 

The final conclusion in an essay for transfer students should be short, sweet, and straightforward. It should not:

Leave the Readers Wanting More

There should be no cliffhangers in your essay. You aren’t writing a novel with a sequel; this essay is all the admissions committee will receive, so you want it to paint a comprehensive and complete picture of yourself.

Introduce New Information

Don’t use your conclusion to throw in any afterthoughts you had while revising your essay. You’ll have a lot of ideas for what to include in your essay, but you shouldn’t try to fit all of them into such a limited space. 

Make Promises

Don’t try to convince the admissions committee to accept you into their programs by making bogus promises. You don’t need to promise them you’ll be a stellar student at the top of your classes or that you’ll make great contributions to their school community. 

There should be no ultimatums in your essay! If you find yourself writing a sentence along the lines of “If you accept me into your school, I promise to…”, dial it back and refocus your conclusion. 

Mistakes to Avoid in Your College Transfer Essay

When crafting your college transfer essay, it's essential to steer clear of common pitfalls that can hinder your chances of acceptance. This is especially important in writing effective transfer essays for Ivy League schools that are looking for the best of the best.

Clarity Is Key

Make sure your essay is crystal clear in explaining your reasons for transferring and what you hope to achieve at your prospective new college. Avoid vague or overly broad statements that might leave the admissions committee perplexed about your motivations.

Emphasize Positivity

Another crucial mistake to avoid is adopting a negative tone throughout your essay. While acknowledging your reasons for transferring is important, dwelling solely on the negative aspects of your current college experience can be off-putting. Instead, emphasize your desire for fresh opportunities and personal growth.

Tailor Your Essay

One-size-fits-all essays are also to be avoided. When you look at an 

sample of a transfer statement or an essay that’s been successful, you’ll notice that it’s not generic. So, do your best to tailor your essay to the specific college you're applying to, highlighting what makes that institution the right fit for your educational goals. 

Focus on Aspirations

Additionally, resist the urge to place blame on your current college, professors, or classmates for your decision to transfer. Focus on your aspirations and what you hope to achieve at the new college.

Stay Realistic

Be realistic in your expectations; avoid making it sound like the new college is a magical solution to all your academic or personal challenges. Keep your essay concise and within the prescribed word limit, as admissions officers have many essays to review.

Thorough Research Matters

Thoroughly research the new college and mention specific programs, professors, or resources that align with your goals. Grammatical errors and spelling mistakes can detract from your essay's impact, so proofread it carefully.

Highlight Personal Growth

Lastly, don't forget to showcase personal growth and the lessons you've learned from your current college experience. Admissions officers appreciate applicants who demonstrate self-awareness and a commitment to growth.

Hopefully this breakdown has inspired you to write your own memorable essay.

Student typing college transfer essay on computer

College Transfer Essay Example

Understanding the steps to write a college transfer essay and what to avoid is a great place to start, but you might still be struggling to visualize what an excellent transfer essay looks like. Take a look at these examples of transfer essays to get started.  

Essay Example #1

Here is a successful college transfer essay example that got a student into Duke University—a school with a transfer acceptance rate ranging from 3% to 7% in the past five years.

“A goal without a plan is just a wish, and I don't consider myself to be a wishful thinker, but a person of practical approach. And so, when I began my freshman year of college, Louisiana State University was strategically the best available option. 
LSU offered the scholarships I needed, including the statewide TOPS program which, at the time, guaranteed the price of tuition for anyone with an ACT score of twenty-seven or above. 
Additionally, LSU had no cap on early credit, which allowed me to put to use the seventy-four hours I had amassed in high school towards pursuing majors in political science, economics, and French with an Arabic minor.
However, I didn't know the hindrances I would face at LSU in pursuit of my chosen career path until I was plugging into the campus community, at which point I found a number of pragmatic reasons that LSU is no longer appropriate for the goals towards which I am working.
The obstacles began to arise when I finally honed my interests. I distinctly remember change brewing as I sat in my biweekly social contract seminar listening to my professor discuss the paper he was working on, in which he aimed to tie human prosociality to neuroplasticity, all of which, he argued, would undermine Hobbes’ social contract theory.
That’s what I wanted – not the subject matter, but the principle. I wanted the attempt; I wanted to learn and to theorize and even to be wrong sometimes. I wanted to translate my interdisciplinary interests in political and economic theory into applicable policy.
Given my passion for writing and discussion, sharing theories and findings with colleagues and inspiring students, too, was ideal. And so, I finally knew I wanted to be a professor of public policy.
Sadly, LSU did not have a public policy program, and so I defaulted to political science. However, the political science department is inherently theory-based rather than policy-oriented. From studying the public policy curricula of other universities, I know that a public policy program is more suited to my own interest in applications of governance.
Undeterred by this initial setback and eager to begin my journey in the world of academia, I immediately sought research opportunities, but I quickly learned that they weren’t easily accessible.
Upon meeting with counsellors, I was told I would have to find professors to work with on my own, as there was no designated undergraduate research database or protocol. 
This in itself was another stark concern as I need a university in which conducting research is an integral part of the collegiate experience as it is a necessity in my education and preparation for the future. 
Though I have contacted professors, happy to take any experience I can get, I have found that most positions are reserved for upperclassmen and are primarily data entry oriented. 
Also, the lack of a public policy program has meant that the available work I have found does not meet the particular needs of the future policy-oriented research in which I hope to engage.
Though I know I could do well at LSU and receive an amazing education, staying at the university would mean, at best, having to overcome serious curricular deficits in achieving my goals or, at worst, having to change my plans altogether. 
And so, I have resolved to transfer in an effort to give myself the best possible opportunity to prepare for and succeed in my future.” 

Why This Essay Works

Like the Duke admissions committee, you were likely impressed by this essay! To ensure you know exactly what to include in your own essay, here are the aspects that make this Duke-approved essay successful:

Its Interesting Opening

This student uses their own quote to open their essay. As simple as their introduction is, it gets the point across and intrigues the reader to learn more. 

Right off the bat it also proves this student has a sense of direction; they have plans that they are determined to fulfill. This not only shows ambition but proves to the admission committee this student has actually put thought into their choice to transfer.

Its Use of Concrete Examples

The student recounts the exact moment they realized their current school did not offer the resources they needed to succeed. This personal story makes the essay more authentic and immerses the readers into their life and thought process.

Its Positive Outlook

While the student lists all the reasons for their transfer, namely that their current school does not offer the right program and that it has limited research opportunities, they remain positive throughout.

They still praise their current school for its excellent scholarship program, early credit approval, and thought-provoking lectures, but contend they require more to reach their goals.

This student also demonstrates their willingness to persevere and make the best of their situation by searching for research opportunities and joining the next best program available. Yet, despite their efforts, they decided a transfer was in their best interests. These traits, perseverance and self-awareness, are key to a great transfer essay!

Its Effective Conclusion

This essay proves your conclusion doesn’t have to be elaborate to work. This student’s conclusion reiterates their opinions on their current school, that it is great but not perfect, and states their opinions on their transfer school, that it can offer them the most opportunity. It is simple yet highly effective!

Essay Example #2

Take a look at this second transfer essay example . It was provided by Miami Dade College, which also has a collection of successful examples of personal statements for transfer applicants to refer to. 

Though the school this particular essay example was written for is unknown, it was indeed a successful essay and has much to offer. 

“On a dark and breezy night after a hurricane sped through town, a tall little girl sat on her great-aunt’s porch in Santa Clara and stared at the stars she had never before seen. They’re so bright, she thought in awe. 
They seemed so near, she might be able to reach out to the ashy vastness and grab one, maybe put it under her pillow to brighten her dreams. With eyes wide open, she listened to her momma tell stories of men with belts, and twin sisters, and brother bears, such fantastical worlds that made more sense than her own.
 A crooked smile adorned her chubby face as she sat on her momma’s lap amidst the laziness of a late summer weeknight. Her warm, mud pie eyes seemed to be too big for her little face every time they opened with wonder or grew with curiosity. The light that would shine from within them was something to behold. 
The way she would perk up at the mention of an adventure or a possible journey was almost comical. She was such an expressive child it felt almost as if you were watching a miniaturized adult. Sometimes, she would place her awkwardly big hands on her little hips and furrow her dark eyebrows as she reprimanded her dog for chewing apart her favorite Reptar quilt. 
A brave little thing she was, that charcoal-haired girl. She walked across the river before the others, making up a little trail on the rocks as she went so they weren’t scared. She challenged the fastest runner in third grade to a race; even though she lost, all the girls in fifth grade suddenly wanted to become her best friend. 
She wasn’t popular, but people knew her as the one who they could talk to. She wasn’t wise or all-knowing, but she always had something to say. She was an odd child, if not strange. 
She was quite tranquil, she never really cried when she fell from her bicycle. Instead of playing house, she played librarian. Instead of drawing pink flowers and blue skies, she would write her momma letters. 
Defining her was as difficult of a task as separating the different flavors of a melted Napolitano ice cream on a sticky Sunday afternoon. Yes, she was simple, but she had these moments where she would take the ordinary out of the world and make you forget there was something rather bland about everyday life. 
As that little girl grew older, she reminded herself of who she was, and promised never to forget. She vowed to remember how she grew up and reaffirm her belief in herself. She grew quickly, almost skipping through the teenage years like a child would through a hopscotch game. 
It happened so fast, it was almost impossible to distinguish at one point she was a little girl with a big dream, and when she turned into a woman with great hopes for her future.”

It’s clear why this essay was a success. Keep reading to learn why it resonated with the admissions committee. 

Compelling Storytelling

This essay begins with a captivating story set against the backdrop of a hurricane. It describes a young girl sitting on her great-aunt's porch, gazing at the stars with awe. This vivid imagery immediately draws the reader into the narrative, making it easy to picture the scene and the girl's sense of wonder.

Emotional Connection 

As the story unfolds, the reader is not just told about the girl's experiences but is made to feel them. We witness her curiosity, her bold challenges (like racing the fastest runner in her class), and her unique quirks (such as playing librarian and writing letters instead of drawing). This emotional connection helps us relate to the girl and understand her character.

Smooth Transition and Reflection

The essay smoothly transitions from describing the girl's childhood to her growth into a young woman. It skillfully highlights her commitment to maintaining her sense of self and personal growth. This transition bridges her past experiences with her future aspirations, making her transfer to a new college a natural and logical step in her journey.

Symbolism and Metaphor

The use of symbolism and metaphor enhances the essay's impact. The comparison of the girl's personality to "melted Napolitano ice cream on a sticky Sunday afternoon" vividly conveys her complexity. It suggests that she can transform ordinary situations into something extraordinary, hinting at her potential contributions to a new academic environment.

Resonance and Promise

The essay closes on a reflective note, emphasizing the girl's promise to remember her roots and her rapid transformation into adulthood. 

This conclusion creates a sense of resonance with the reader, leaving a lasting impression of her character and determination. It implies that she is ready for the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in her college journey.

Hopefully, these samples of transfer essays have inspired you. To learn more, check out these other transfer essay examples .  

FAQs: Writing a College Transfer Essay

We’ve provided an in-depth tutorial on writing a college transfer essay that’ll impress the admissions committee and get you into your dream school. For any remaining questions, read on to find your answers.

1. How Do You Start a College Transfer Essay?

The best way to start a college transfer essay is by sharing a memorable experience that either influenced your decision to change schools or is integral to your perspective on education. 

2. How Long Should My Transfer Essay Be?

The exact length of your transfer essay will depend on the university you are applying to. However, these essays are typically around one to two pages long. 

3. How Do You Write a Short Transfer Essay?

Some universities will ask that your transfer essays do not exceed one page or around 250 words. In this case, it’s essential you still include all the necessary information listed in this guide but do so in a succinct way. Here are some general tips to make sure your short transfer essay still packs a punch:

  • During the brainstorming process, separate all the great ideas from the excellent ones; only use the excellent ideas
  • Share only one concrete experience that influenced you to transfer colleges
  • Keep your introduction and conclusion short, preferably only a few sentences each
  • Use simple, straightforward language and avoid overly flowery language that takes up valuable space 
  • Focus on the big reasons you want to attend your transfer college, leave smaller perks out

While it may seem counterproductive, you should write your first rough draft without paying attention to the word count. If you worry too much about staying within the limits, you may leave out important ideas or overthink your narrative.

Once you’ve written out a good rough draft, spend time revising and cutting down to meet the requirements. This way, you’ll have all of your ideas written out and can pick the best ones.

4. What Should You Not Write in a Transfer Essay?

You should avoid the following in your college transfer essay:

  • Overused or generic quotes
  • Badmouthing your current school
  • Blaming your current school for its inability to meet your expectations
  • Exaggerated stories
  • Vague reasons for your transfer
  • Generic reasons to join your transfer school
  • A conclusion that leaves the readers with more questions 

You should avoid making any grammatical, syntax, or spelling errors in your essay, as doing so will make it less effective. Also, keep in mind that using the same college essay for your transfer application is not a good idea. It may make you appear insincere and not fully engaged in your new academic path.

5. How Important Are Transfer Essays?

Your transfer essay isn’t the only application material the admissions committee will consider. However, it can play a large role in their selection process. In a recent survey, it was found that almost half of all participating colleges stated the transfer essay has considerable or moderate importance.

Hence, it’s essential you spend an adequate amount of time perfecting your essay to ensure it helps rather than harms your chances of acceptance. 

6. How Do You End a College Transfer Essay?

You should end your college transfer essay by revisiting the principle, experience, or statement you used in your introduction. Reiterate this sentiment and expand on it after sharing your experience with your current university and the experience you hope to have at your desired school.

Keep your conclusion brief and avoid making any promises to the admissions committee or including new information that would require further explanation. 

7. Are College Transfer Essays the Same as Personal Statements?

No, you’ll write personal statements during your first round of applications. These statements are more open-ended and broad than college transfer essays. They simply give the admissions committee more insight into who you are. 

Students may choose to write more about their academics, extracurriculars, or life experiences that influenced them to pursue a certain career path. The main purpose of your transfer essay is to explain why you’re switching schools. 

Final Thoughts

Don’t underestimate the power of your words! Understanding how to write a college transfer essay can be a game changer. A strong college transfer essay can convince the admissions committee you’re a mature, determined, and ambitious student who would make a great addition to their university.

Follow the tips and strategies shared in this guide to ensure you write a memorable and winning college transfer essay! 

Access 20+ Transfer Essay Examples Here

First name, vector icon of a person

Get A Free Consultation

You may also like.

Brown vs. Dartmouth: Which College to Choose?

Brown vs. Dartmouth: Which College to Choose?

Does Being an Eagle Scout Help with College Admissions?

Does Being an Eagle Scout Help with College Admissions?

transfer essay example ut

Sample College Transfer Essay

A Sample Essay by a Student Transferring From Amherst to Penn

Jacob Wackerhausen / Getty Images

  • Essay Samples & Tips
  • College Admissions Process
  • College Profiles
  • College Rankings
  • Choosing A College
  • Application Tips
  • Testing Graphs
  • College Financial Aid
  • Advanced Placement
  • Homework Help
  • Private School
  • College Life
  • Graduate School
  • Business School
  • Distance Learning
  • Ph.D., English, University of Pennsylvania
  • M.A., English, University of Pennsylvania
  • B.S., Materials Science & Engineering and Literature, MIT

The following sample essay was written by a student named David. He wrote the transfer essay below for the Common Transfer Application in response to the prompt, "Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve" (250 to 650 words). David is attempting to transfer from Amherst College to the University of Pennsylvania . As far as admissions standards go, this is a lateral move—both schools are extremely selective. His letter will need to be extremely strong for his transfer application to be successful.

Key Takeaways: A Winning Transfer Essay

  • Have a clear academic reason for your transfer. Personal reasons are fine, but academics need to come first.
  • Stay positive. Don't speak badly of your current school. Emphasize what you like about your target school, not what you dislike about your current school.
  • Be meticulous. Grammar, punctuation, and style matter. Show that you put time and care into your writing.

David's Transfer Application Essay

During the summer after my first year of college, I spent six weeks volunteering at an archaeological excavation in Hazor, site of the largest tel (mound) in Israel. My time in Hazor was not easy—wake-up came at 4:00 a.m., and by noontime temperatures were often in the 90s. The dig was sweaty, dusty, back-breaking work. I wore out two pairs of gloves and the knees in several pairs of khakis. Nevertheless, I loved every minute of my time in Israel. I met interesting people from around the world, worked with amazing students and faculty from Hebrew University, and became fascinated with the current efforts to create a portrait of life in the Canaanite period.
Upon my return to Amherst College for my sophomore year, I soon came to realize that the school does not offer the exact major I now hope to pursue. I'm majoring in anthropology, but the program at Amherst is almost entirely contemporary and sociological in its focus. More and more my interests are becoming archaeological and historical. When I visited Penn this fall, I was impressed by the breadth of offerings in anthropology and archaeology, and I absolutely loved your Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Your broad approach to the field with emphases on understanding both the past and present has great appeal to me. By attending Penn, I hope to broaden and deepen my knowledge in anthropology, participate in more summer field work, volunteer at the museum, and eventually, go on to graduate school in archaeology.
My reasons for transferring are almost entirely academic. I have made many good friends at Amherst, and I have studied with some wonderful professors. However, I do have one non-academic reason for being interested in Penn. I originally applied to Amherst because it was comfortable—I come from a small town in Wisconsin, and Amherst felt like home. I'm now looking forward to pushing myself to experience places that aren't quite so familiar. The kibbutz at Kfar HaNassi was one such environment, and the urban environment of Philadelphia would be another.
As my transcript shows, I have done well at Amherst and I am convinced I can meet the academic challenges of Penn. I know I would grow at Penn, and your program in anthropology perfectly matches my academic interests and professional goals.

Before we even get to the critique of David's essay, it's important to put his transfer into context. David is attempting to transfer into an  Ivy League  school. Penn is not the most selective of the country's top universities, but the transfer acceptance rate is still around 6% (at Harvard and Stanford, that number is closer to 1%). David needs to approach this effort at transfer realistically — even with excellent grades and a stellar essay, his chances of success are far from guaranteed.

That said, he has many things going for him — he is coming from an equally demanding college where he has earned good grades, and he seems like the type of student who will certainly succeed at Penn. He will need strong  letters of recommendation  to round out his application.

Analysis of David's Transfer Essay

Now on to the essay... Let's break down the discussion of David's transfer essay into several categories.

The Reasons for Transfer

The strongest feature of David's essay is the focus. David is pleasingly specific in presenting his reasons for transferring. He knows exactly what he wants to study, and he has a clear understanding of what both Penn and Amherst have to offer him. David's description of his experience in Israel defines the focus of his essay, and he then connects that experience to his reasons for wanting to transfer. There are lots of bad reasons to transfer, but David's clear interest in studying anthropology and archaeology makes his motives seem both well thought-out and reasonable.

Many transfer applicants are trying to move to a new college because they are running away from some kind of bad experience, sometimes something academic, sometimes something more personal. David, however, clearly likes Amherst and is running towards something—an opportunity at Penn that better matches his newly discovered professional goals. This is a big positive factor for his application.

The Common Transfer Application instructions state that the essay needs to be at least 250 words. The maximum length is 650 words. David's essay comes in at around 380 words. It is tight and concise. He doesn't waste time talking about his disappointments with Amherst, nor does he put much effort into explaining the things that other parts of his application will cover such as grades and extracurricular involvement. He does have a lot more space left to elaborate, but in this case the letter gets the job done well with few words.

David gets the tone perfect, something that is difficult to do in a transfer essay. Let's face it—if you are transferring it is because there is something about your current school that you don't like. It's easy to be negative and critical of your classes, your professors, your college environment, and so on. It's also easy to come across as a whiner or an ungenerous and angry person who doesn't have the inner resources to make the most of one's circumstances. David avoids these pitfalls. His representation of Amherst is extremely positive. He praises the school while noting that the curricular offerings do not match his professional goals.

The Personality

Partly because of the tone discussed above, David comes across as a pleasant person, someone who the admissions folks are likely to want to have as part of their campus community. Moreover, David presents himself as someone who likes to push himself to grow. He is honest in his reasons for going to Amherst—the school seemed like a good "fit" given his small-town upbringing. It is, therefore, impressive to see him so actively working to expand his experiences beyond his provincial roots. David has clearly grown at Amherst, and he is looking forward to growing more at Penn.

The Writing

When applying to a place like Penn, the technical aspects of the writing need to be flawless. David's prose is clear, engaging and free of errors. If you struggle on this front, be sure to check out these  tips for improving your essay's style . And if grammar isn't your greatest strength, be sure to work through your essay with someone who does have strong grammar skills.

A Final Word on David's Transfer Essay

David's college transfer essay does exactly what an essay needs to do, and he includes the features of a strong transfer essay . He clearly articulates his reasons for transferring, and he does so in a positive and specific way. David presents himself as a serious student with clear academic and professional goals. We have little doubt that he has the skills and intellectual curiosity to succeed at Penn, and he has made a strong argument about why this particular transfer makes a lot of sense.

Odds are still against David's success given the competitive nature of Ivy League transfers, but he has strengthened his application with his essay.

  • Tips for Writing a Winning College Transfer Essay
  • How to Transfer Colleges: A Guide for Success
  • The Hidden Cost of Transferring to a Different College
  • Good Reasons to Transfer to a Different College
  • Sample College Admissions Essay - Student Teacher
  • Sample Weak Supplemental Essay for Duke University
  • Sample College Admission Essay—The Allegany County Youth Board
  • Short Answer Response on Working at Burger King
  • The Length Requirements for the Common Application Essay in 2020-21
  • Ideal College Application Essay Length
  • "My Dads" - Sample Common Application Essay for Option #1
  • Sample Application Essay - Porkopolis
  • College Application Essay - The Job I Should Have Quit
  • The Five College Consortium
  • The Life of Talcott Parsons and His Influence on Sociology
  • "Grandpa's Rubik's Cube"—Sample Common Application Essay, Option #4

How to Write a Winning College Transfer Essay

December 27, 2021

transfer essay example ut

Much like snowflakes, DNA profiles, or interpretations of a David Lynch film, no two college transfer applicants are alike. Even if two prospective transfers to Boston University are both named Fred and each hail from Farmington, CT, their paths, and the contours of their academic journeys are probably quite different from one another. Perhaps Fred #1 is a first-generation college student who, for financial reasons, had to complete his freshman year at the local community college. Perhaps Fred #2 underachieved a touch in high school, gained admission into a less-selective state school where he excelled freshman year and is now highly-motivated to study at top school. Each Fred possesses an equally valid story to tell the BU admissions office, and doing so adeptly may well be the key to their acceptance. After all, 42% of all U.S. colleges—and close to 100% of highly-selective schools—cite the essay as being “important” to their transfer application decisions.

To cite another relevant statistic, 37% of all college students transfer at some point in their academic career and each has a worthwhile pathway to chronicle. Whether you’re Fred #1, Fred #2, or someone not even named Fred (imagine that!), you need your transfer essay to be so strong that it leaps right off the page and captures the attention (or, even better, heart) of an admissions officer. In the following article, the College Transitions team will explain precisely how to master this essential component of the transfer application.

Which Transfer essay prompt should I pick?

Starting in 2020-21, the Common App granted its member institutions the option of allowing their transfer applicants to select one of the seven current Common App essay prompts (that are available to freshman applicants).

Some schools will offer you this option, while others will simply ask you the equivalent of “Why are you applying to our university?” If you are given the choice between prompts, it is generally best to select the one that is most broad (note: a broad prompt is good, a broad essay is not) and allows you to compose an essay containing the following essential elements:

  • 1) Why your prospective transfer school is a perfect fit for you.
  • 2) Why your journey has led you away from your current institution.
  • 3) What unique attributes and talents you will bring to campus.
  • 4) How your past achievements and efforts can bolster your case.
  • 5) Share your academic and career ambitions.

Let’s dive in and take a more thorough look at each component, beginning with #1.

1) Why this college is the perfect fit for you

Share with your prospective new academic home exactly what makes them attractive to you. Smaller class size, a particular academic program, a more diverse environment, or the opportunity to for hands-on learning/research opportunities are just a sampling of the legitimate selling points you can cite. Mention specific courses that you are eager to take at their institution, certain distinguished professors who you desire to study under, and unique clubs, activities, or campus traditions in which you are excited to partake. Take advantage of this chance to impress admissions officers with you expansive knowledge of their institution as well as a highly-specific accounting of how you will take advantage of your 2-3 years there. Doing so will separate you from the pack of similarly-qualified transfer applicants.

2) Why you want to leave your current college

Make sure that the reasons that you communicate for wanting to transfer do not end up sounding like a nasty Yelp review of your present school. While you may want to leave College X because the professors are all centenarian windbags and your roommate is breeding capybaras to sell on Craigslist (is there really a market for that?), remember that the school to which you are applying wants to feel wanted. Think about it—would you rather listen to your girlfriend/boyfriend rant about their ex or hear them tell you what makes you awesome? Admissions officers considering a transfer student feel the same way.

3) What unique attributes you will bring to campus

Even in the transfer admissions process, admissions officers are tasked with enhancing the diversity of their undergraduate student body and adding individuals who are likely to be contributing members of the campus community. Is there a particular club that you are eager to join or do wish to start your own? Do you desire to assist a professor in conducting research? Are you an a cappella star or club volleyball diehard? What books do you read for pleasure? Do you have a hidden talent or area of expertise? Are you an introvert or extrovert (both can be selling points)? What ideas, activities, or dreams keep you up in the middle of the night? Give the admissions reader a full picture of what your life will look at their school and how you will make more of an impact (in any form) than many of your fellow applicants.

4) Talk about your academic and extracurricular record

This is also a perfect opportunity to demonstrate your record of involvement on your current campus. It is far easier to sell yourself as someone who will be a contributing member of the campus community if you displayed these qualities at your previous college. Students with an eye on transferring are sometimes so focused on escaping their first institution that they fail to become involved in anything outside of the classroom and thus miss out on valuable opportunities to demonstrate leadership and passion—the very traits needed to transfer to a prestigious school. Write about what you are most proud of—a challenging physics exam you mastered, a philosophy paper you wrote arguing the compatibility of science and religion, or how you started a campus chapter of an organization dedicated to fighting pancreatic cancer.

5) Share your academic and career ambitions

The more you can use your essay to communicate your genuine passions and what makes you tick, the better. Doing so gives your essay broader context and deeper meaning, as it explains the true significance of all of the info shared in steps #1-4. If you want to major in biology, where do you see that taking you down the road? Are you considering graduate or medical school? Do you want to work in research in a specific area? You don’t have to be 100% sure of your career and future academic path at 19 or 20 years old, but as a transfer student, you should share where your experiences and interests may someday take you.

College Transfer Essay – Do’s and Don’ts

  • Make a coherent and well-researched case for why the school to which you are applying would be a perfect fit for you.
  • Explain how you spend your time outside of school whether it’s participation in a club or sport, paid work, or a hobby to which you are extremely dedicated.
  • Paint a picture of the reasons why this new university is the right place to pursue your academic interests.
  • Give the committee a sense of your talents and character/personal qualities. If your school does not offer interviews, this essay will be primary vehicle through which you can forge a personal connection to a fellow human being.
  • Bash your current school or overly-focus on the negative.
  • Make excuses for past academic performance of lack of outside the classroom involvement.
  • Say that you want to attend a new school for the prestige, the pretty campus, or for a personal reason (close to home, girl/boyfriend attends, etc.).
  • Forget to do adequate research on your prospective academic home. Details matter!
  • Application Strategies
  • College Essay

' src=

Andrew Belasco

A licensed counselor and published researcher, Andrew's experience in the field of college admissions and transition spans two decades. He has previously served as a high school counselor, consultant and author for Kaplan Test Prep, and advisor to U.S. Congress, reporting on issues related to college admissions and financial aid.

  • 2-Year Colleges
  • Best Colleges by Major
  • Best Colleges by State
  • Big Picture
  • Career & Personality Assessment
  • College Search/Knowledge
  • College Success
  • Costs & Financial Aid
  • Dental School Admissions
  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Graduate School Admissions
  • High School Success
  • High Schools
  • Law School Admissions
  • Medical School Admissions
  • Navigating the Admissions Process
  • Online Learning
  • Private High School Spotlight
  • Summer Program Spotlight
  • Summer Programs
  • Test Prep Provider Spotlight

College Transitions Sidebar Block Image

“Innovative and invaluable…use this book as your college lifeline.”

— Lynn O'Shaughnessy

Nationally Recognized College Expert

College Planning in Your Inbox

Join our information-packed monthly newsletter.

I am a... Student Student Parent Counselor Educator Other First Name Last Name Email Address Zip Code Area of Interest Business Computer Science Engineering Fine/Performing Arts Humanities Mathematics STEM Pre-Med Psychology Social Studies/Sciences Submit

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content

University Writing Center

Writing Effective Internal Transfer Essays ( 35-45 min. )

July 27, 2021 by

Login or sign up to be automatically entered into our next $10,000 scholarship giveaway

Get Searching

  • College Search
  • College Search Map
  • Graduate Programs
  • Featured Colleges
  • Scholarship Search
  • Lists & Rankings

Articles & Advice

  • Ask the Experts
  • Campus Visits
  • Catholic Colleges and Universities
  • Christian Colleges and Universities
  • College Admission
  • College Athletics
  • College Diversity
  • Counselors and Consultants
  • Education and Teaching
  • Financial Aid
  • Graduate School
  • Health and Medicine
  • International Students
  • Internships and Careers
  • Majors and Academics
  • Performing and Visual Arts
  • Public Colleges and Universities
  • Science and Engineering
  • Student Life
  • Transfer Students
  • Why CollegeXpress
  • $10,000 Scholarship
  • CollegeXpress Store
  • Corporate Website
  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • CA and EU Privacy Policy

Articles & Advice > Transfer Students > Articles

Older blonde female in glasses, arms crossed, smiling in black and white office

The Best Transfer Essay Advice From Admission Insiders

Your transfer college application essay is just as important as it was the first time around. Learn how to write a winning essay with this expert advice.

by Kim Lifton President, Wow Writing Workshop

Last Updated: Jun 6, 2023

Originally Posted: Jul 10, 2019

The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is clear about what they want in the supplemental essay that’s required of every transfer applicant. In no more than 500 words, U-M asks students to “Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?” “I want to understand why they want to transfer,” says Kimberly Bryant, Assistant Director of Admissions and point person for transfer applications. “Sometimes they don’t say it: Why do they want to come to U-M? Why now? What is the reason?” Bryant would like to see genuine answers to the question. “I want them to talk about the journey,” she says. “I’m not going to guess why someone missed a semester of college. Maybe they just weren’t ready. That’s okay. They are now, and we want them to talk about that. We don’t want to guess.”

What is a transfer college essay, anyway?

Bryant and other admission professionals at top universities across the country say the transfer college essay provides an opportunity to show people who may never meet you just what kind of person you are and why you need to switch schools for your goals. Most schools don't conduct transfer interviews, so the college essay requirement could be your only opportunity to share your unique voice with the people who get to decide your fate inside the admission office. Amy Jarich, Associate Vice Chancellor of Admissions & Enrollment and Director of Admissions at the University of California, Berkeley , wants to know what you care about. “What would you tell me in an elevator? Let me know that you’re active and alive in the world you live in.” Tamara Siler, Senior Associate Director of Admission at   Rice University ,   says any application essay will add context to any transfer application file. “A personal statement can provide context and truly show why a certain student is a better match than other clearly capable students,” she says. “Sometimes an essay can be the conduit for a student to reveal something to the admission committee that we would never have thought to ask.”

Related: 6 Important Pieces of the Transfer Admission Process

How do I make my essay stand out?

Colleges will use your essay to help select a diverse class from among the many other transfer applicants whose grades, test scores, and extracurricular activities can make everyone look alike. How will you stand out? Overall, admission officers look for a glimpse of who an applicant is as a writer, but more importantly, as a person. They use the essay to help determine what an applicant can offer them and what the student has learned from their life experiences—the things that aren’t easily captured on a transcript or activities list. Calvin Wise, the Director of Recruitment for Johns Hopkins University , gets excited when he reads a stellar essay. Just like admission officers at other highly selective schools, Wise expects 4.0 GPAs and top test scores. “We need to dig deeper,” he says. “That’s where the essay comes into play. That’s where we find out more about the student. We are looking for your story. Academically, we’re glad you’ve done well. We want to know who you are. What did your experience mean to you? How did it shape you? “I never run into a colleague’s office and say, ‘Look at this 4.0 GPA,’ Wise adds. “I will run into an office with a good essay to share; that excites me.”

What do you want colleges to know about you?

Your essay should show who you are beyond your grades, transcripts, and test scores. Consider your best traits and characteristics, not your accomplishments and experiences. Colleges want to know who you are , not what you did . They want genuine stories that illustrate a positive trait or characteristic. When applying as a transfer student, they also want to know why this school is a better fit for you. What do you want to do there? The transfer essay is a variation of the “Why College X?” essay supplement. It can be challenging for freshman applicants as well as transfer students. A prompt from the new Common App transfer application reads: “Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve” in 250–600 words. Most transfer essay prompts will be a variation of this question. For example:

  • Cornell University : Tell us what you'd like to major in at Cornell, why or how your past academic or work experience influenced your decision, and how transferring to Cornell would further your academic interests.
  • University of California, Los Angeles : Please describe how you have prepared for your intended major, including your readiness to succeed in your upper-division courses once you enroll at the university.
  • University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences: How do your possible career or professional plans relate to your planned course of study?

Every college wants to know specifically why you are applying to that institution. You started somewhere else, either at a community college or a school that just isn’t working out the way you had envisioned. They expect you to have good reasons for making a move, so share them in your essay. Be thoughtful. Be honest. Is there something this school offers that your current school doesn’t? Are you more clear about what you want to major in and realize the program at the new school is stronger? Let them know. You know more about yourself now; you’ve matured since you first applied to college. Perhaps you took time off to work. Just tell them why you want to make a move.

Related: How to Write a Transfer Essay That Will Impress Admission Officers

What makes a good transfer essay?

In your transfer statement and other writing supplements, you need to reveal something meaningful about yourself. What are three traits you want to share with a new school? Are you resourceful? Dependable? Curious? A hard worker? Shy? Funny? Competitive? Determined? Shawn Felton, the Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Cornell, reviews thousands of applications each admission cycle. What delights him? A story that rounds out an applicant’s package and an essay that helps him understand who the person is. “We want to put a face to the pile of paper,” Felton explains. “It is part of a number of identifiers that deliver who you are as a person.”

What turns him off? Stories that aren’t genuine, don’t answer the prompt , or fail to give him any insight into the applicant’s character. He doesn’t like it when students try too hard to impress him or write essays that seem forced or inauthentic. “The essay is not something to be cracked,” he cautions. There’s no rubric for a good transfer essay, but the ones that stand out all share a few common features. Regardless of the prompt, they:

  • Answer the question;
  • Showcase a positive trait or characteristic;
  • Sound like a college student;
  • Illustrate something meaningful about the student;
  • Explain why a student wants to transfer to a new school; and
  • Demonstrate reflection.

The best transfer essays showcase a more mature student and are often simple and to the point. As a student who has already succeeded in a college classroom, you can tell your new college of choice that you know how you learn best (e.g., you shine in small classrooms, love leading group projects, excel in science or math or any subject). How can you build on your current educational (and work) experience at a new college?

Related:  What's Your Story? A Guide to Transfer Admission Essays

Your transfer essay isn’t all that different than the one you wrote when you applied to college back in high school. You may have to focus a little more on the topic of  why you’re transferring, but the process of writing it should be more or less the same. Take this advice into consideration as you do and you’re sure to write a great essay that’ll allow you to transfer to the school of your choice.

Find more great tips for the transfer admission process with the articles and advice in our Transfer Students section.

Like what you’re reading?

Join the CollegeXpress community! Create a free account and we’ll notify you about new articles, scholarship deadlines, and more.

Tags: application essays college essays transfer advice transfer applications transfer students writing tips

Join our community of over 5 million students!

CollegeXpress has everything you need to simplify your college search, get connected to schools, and find your perfect fit.

High School Class of 2021

CollegeXpress helped me find the school I am currently attending by consistently sending me emails of other schools. This allowed me to do research on other schools as well as the one I am in now!

Victoria

High School Class of 2019

CollegeXpress has helped me by opening my eyes to new opportunities. I learned about such easy ways to get financial help to achieve my dreams while also learning about myself and who I truly am. I know this isn't a very long explanation of what CollegeXpress has done for me, but nonetheless, I believe it's crucial to how I developed as a person throughout my time as a college student.

Laura Wallace

Laura Wallace

My favorite part of CollegeXpress is that it features student writers so I get an inside perspective from students slightly older and farther along than me. I realize that other college websites also utilize student writers; however, I relate the most to the college writers that I read articles from on CollegeXpress.

Maya Ingraham

Maya Ingraham

October 2021 Mini Scholarship Winner, Class of 2022

CollegeXpress has given me more confidence in my college process. With easy-to-access resources and guidance such as the CX Weekly Roundup, I have been able to find the best colleges for me. Most importantly, there’s a surplus of scholarship opportunities for every student to support their education.

Sierra Carranza

High School Class of 2022

I had absolutely no idea where I wanted to go to school; I was considering colleges in almost every state. CollegeXpress was an amazing resource and helped me compare all of my top schools. Without the help of CollegeXpress, I probably wouldn't have made such an informed and confident decision.

  •   How to Fight for Your Credits: An Expert Look Into the Transfer Process
  •   Our Best Advice for the Transfer Admission Process
  •   Great Colleges and Universities in the West for Transfer Students
  •   Great Colleges and Universities in New England for Transfer Students
  •   Great Colleges and Universities in the Northeast for Transfer Students

Colleges You May Be Interested In

Kean University

The University of Tampa

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey—Newark

Moody Bible Institute

Chicago, IL

The Catholic University of America

Washington, DC

Personalize your experience on CollegeXpress.

With this information, we'll do our best to display content relevant to your interests. By subscribing, you agree to receive CollegeXpress emails and to make your information available to colleges and universities, scholarship programs, and other companies that have relevant/related offers.

Already have an account?

Log in to be directly connected to

Not a CollegeXpress user?

Don't want to register.

Provide your information below to connect with

transfer essay example ut

IMAGES

  1. Transfer Essay Examples sample, Bookwormlab

    transfer essay example ut

  2. 010 Essay Example Ut Austin ~ Thatsnotus

    transfer essay example ut

  3. Research paper: Ut austin transfer essay

    transfer essay example ut

  4. 30+ College Essay Examples

    transfer essay example ut

  5. UT Transfer

    transfer essay example ut

  6. How to Write a Successful College Transfer Essay & Examples

    transfer essay example ut

VIDEO

  1. Transfer to D'Youville University

  2. Self introduction for Students

  3. DSSS 2024 Vacancy |NEP-2020 & ITS CHALLENGES Essay JJAPASPA Tier-2| BEST TIPS ESSAY WRITING| CLASS-4

  4. What is а Ping

  5. Write 15 Lines English and Hindi Essay on My Brother

  6. TI Nspire CX CAS: Student Software Update (Mac)

COMMENTS

  1. Nine Examples of UT-Austin Transfer Apply Texas Essay A Statement of

    Nine Examples of UT-Austin Transfer Apply Texas Essay A Statement of Purpose. UT requires all prospective external transfer students to write a 600-750 word response to Apply Texas Essay A: The statement of purpose will provide an opportunity to explain any extenuating circumstances that you feel could add value to your application.

  2. How to Write a College Transfer Essay (With Examples)

    Key Takeaways. Explain why you want to transfer, what you need that you are not getting at your current school, and why you chose your current school to begin with. Always present things in a positive light. Share how the transfer school will help you achieve your goals and why you are a good fit for the school.

  3. How to Write the ApplyTexas Essays for Transfers, Re-admits, and

    General Tips for Writing ApplyTexas Essays as a Transfer, Re-admit, or Transient Student ... March 31, 2024 Essay Examples, University of Washington. 7 Magnificent University of Michigan Essay Examples. March 29, 2024 Essay Examples, University of Michigan. 8 Brilliant Brown University and PLME Essay Examples.

  4. Essays & Short Answers

    Please keep your essay between 500-650 words (typically two to three paragraphs). Spring 2025 Essays. All freshman Spring 2025 applicants must submit a required essay: UT Austin Required Essay in the Common App, or; Topic A in ApplyTexas; Please keep your essay between 500-700 words (typically two to three paragraphs). Spring 2025 Essay Topic

  5. 2 Awesome UT Austin Essay Examples

    2 Awesome UT Austin Essay Examples. The University of Texas at Austin is one of the hardest colleges to get into in Texas. With a competitive acceptance rate, the school is moderately selective. Writing strong essays, however, will certainly boost your chances. UT Austin requires one long essay and three short answers, with an additional ...

  6. Transfer Admission

    If you have attended more than one college or university, we'll need a transcript from each school, even if the credits earned at one school were transferred to another. If you are applying for automatic transfer admission, submit your official high school transcript, as well. We cannot accept transcripts via email. Transcript Info.

  7. The 3 Steps To Submitting Your Transfer Application to the University

    3. UT-Austin Transfer Essay Topic A. All Transfer Applicants must submit two application essays to UT Austin. The first essay, Topic A, is required by all applicants, regardless of major. Topic A, also known as a Statement of Purpose should in 500-650 words, address the following prompt: . The statement of purpose will provide an opportunity to explain any extenuating circumstances that you ...

  8. Read 2 Transfer Student Essays That Worked

    By Kelly Mae Ross and Josh Moody. March 3, 2020, at 3:44 p.m. Read 2 Transfer Essays That Worked. Though it isn't a golden ticket, a strong transfer essay may boost an applicant's odds of ...

  9. The CNS Internal Transfer Essay Prompt : r/UTAustin

    The CNS Internal Transfer Essay Prompt. Hey guys, I'm planning on doing a double major in another CNS degree (CS) along with my physics degree and as I was filling out the application, I came across this essay prompt: Submit an essay on how your selected major impacts the achievement of your educational and career goals.

  10. 9 Tips for Transferring to UT-Austin

    Use Essay E to highlight and expand upon an important aspect of your resume. Unlike for first-time freshmen, UT requires all transfer applicants to submit a paper resume. UT recommends including the past five years of experiences. For recent high school graduates, this means you should include your information from high school.

  11. How to Write Best College Transfer Essay: Secrets, Tips and Tricks

    This first example is a transfer essay submitted to the University of Pennsylvania, in response to a prompt asking the applicant to state the reasons for transferring and the objectives he or she hopes to achieve using a minimum of 250 words: My reasons for transferring are two-fold and equally important.

  12. How to Write a College Transfer Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Take a look at these examples of transfer essays to get started. Essay Example #1. Here is a successful college transfer essay example that got a student into Duke University—a school with a transfer acceptance rate ranging from 3% to 7% in the past five years.

  13. Sample College Transfer Essay for Admission

    By. Allen Grove. Updated on January 31, 2020. The following sample essay was written by a student named David. He wrote the transfer essay below for the Common Transfer Application in response to the prompt, "Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve" (250 to 650 words).

  14. How to Write a Winning College Transfer Essay

    1) Why your prospective transfer school is a perfect fit for you. 2) Why your journey has led you away from your current institution. 3) What unique attributes and talents you will bring to campus. 4) How your past achievements and efforts can bolster your case. 5) Share your academic and career ambitions.

  15. What to Know About Good Transfer Essays

    Transfer example essay. It's easy to read about essay-writing tips, but that doesn't necessarily make them easy to implement. ... XYZ University's physical therapy program will lead me to the necessary bachelor's and doctoral degrees I need to succeed in a profession I know will leave me fulfilled—and hold my interest—throughout my ...

  16. Writing an Impressive College Transfer Essay

    Follow the directions carefully. For the application essay and all aspects of the college or university application, transfer students also need to be sure to follow directions exactly: stick to word counts, submit all requested materials and information, meet deadlines, and pay close attention to details. The latter is especially important ...

  17. Transfer

    I provide five examples of UT-Austin Transfer Essay A Statement of Purpose as "…your opportunity to address the admissions committee directly and to let us know more about you as an individual." ... Discussion of data, statistics, and observations for Spring and Fall 2019 External Transfer admissions rates for the University of Texas at ...

  18. Writing Effective Internal Transfer Essays ( 35-45 min. )

    Writing Effective Internal Transfer Essays ( 35-45 min. ) ... UT Learning Commons at Perry-Castañeda Library (PCL 2.330) The Perry-Castañeda Library 101 E 21st St #2.330 Austin, TX 78712. 512-471-6222. Spring Hours: Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 8PM. Friday: 10AM - 4PM. Spring Consultation Dates 2024:

  19. Transfer Essay Advice From Admission Insiders

    The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is clear about what they want in the supplemental essay that's required of every transfer applicant. In no more than 500 words, U-M asks students to "Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School to which you are applying at the University of Michigan.

  20. Introducing the Transfer Essay A "Personal Statement"

    You can get through your transfer essays following the same advice. The required Apply Texas Essay A "Personal Statement" reads: "The statement of purpose will provide an opportunity to explain any extenuating circumstances that you feel could add value to your application. You may also want to explain unique aspects of your academic background ...