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Master's Dissertation Information

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Table of Contents

1.      Intention to Submit 2.      Dissertation Submission 3.      Paper Requirement 4.      Registration 5.      Fees 6.      Contact Details

1.   Intention to Submit

A research student submits a 60, 120 or 180 credit dissertation for examination. Students must inform the Faculty Office of their intention to submit for examination prior to actual submission for examination, by uploading the following to PeopleSoft :

  • EBE01 - Intention to submit form
  • EBE02 - IP assessment form
  • EBE03 - Dissertation Open Access Suppression Form (Embargo Request)
  • A copy of your abstract according to the Student Upload Intention to Submit Guide.

Please see Student Upload Intention to Submit Guide

What does ‚Äėqualify‚Äô mean?

A student qualifies when he or she has met the requirements for the degree/diploma which is ratified by the FEC and approved by SEC.  Graduation may take place weeks or even months after this approval process.  A student may apply for a transcript which will show that the qualification has been completed and that graduation will take place on a date sometime in the future.

What does ‚Äėgraduate‚Äô mean?

A student graduates at a congregation of the University of Cape Town. That is a graduation ceremony where the degree or diploma is conferred upon him/her. The graduation date appears on the certificate and transcript.

Kindly note that the University of Cape Town does not undertake to reach a decision on the award of the degree by any specific date.  We will inform you once your examination process has been completed. 

Please note that these dates are not necessarily in line with the fee rebate dates ‚Äď please see point 5 below for the deadlines for fees.

2.  Dissertation Submission

After consultation with the supervisor, a candidate hoping to graduate midyear/end of the year, is required to submit via PeopleSoft to the Faculty Office:

  • Dissertation

Please include the following in your dissertation - a signed declaration that states: "I know the meaning of plagiarism and declare that all the work in the document, save for that which is properly acknowledged, is my own. This thesis/dissertation has been submitted to the Turnitin module (or  equivalent similarity and originality checking software) and I confirm that my supervisor has seen my report and any concerns revealed by such have been resolved with my supervisor."

  • A copy of your completed and signed EBE Faculty ‚ÄėAssessment of Ethics in Research Projects form‚Äô. This would have been completed when you registered for your dissertation. ¬†
  • A copy of your unofficial transcript
  • EBE04 - Declaration of Free Licence form

Please see  Student Upload Thesis/Dissertation for Examination Guide

Please note that only online submissions of the dissertation are required. You do not need to submit a hard copy.

Please check your PeopleSoft within a week to see if your service request was accepted or declined. If no action was taken, please contact the Faculty Office. 

3. Paper Requirement

Please note this requirement is only for those completing a 120 / 180 credit dissertation.

You are in addition required to submit a summary of the key aspects of the dissertation, presented in the form of a paper which is, potentially, of publishable standard, approved by the supervisor.

Note: The Paper requirement is intended to develop a candidate's skills in academic communication through exposure to the discipline of preparing a scholarly, succinct overview of the subject of the research topic, with due attention to structure, detail, clarity of expression and referencing. If you have not already done so, you must liaise with your supervisor and take appropriate steps to satisfy this requirement. 

You are required to submit the following to the Faculty Office:

  • EBE05 ‚Äď Paper submission form and guidelines
  • An electronic copy can be submitted to¬† [email protected] ¬†

4.  Registration

  • Please note that if you intend to submit your Master's dissertation for examination between December and before the academic term commences the following year you will not¬†be required to register.
  • If you submit your dissertation after the term commences you must re-register by the date set out on the registration programme . If you do not register and you submit your dissertation for examination, your dissertation will not be sent off for examination until you have re-registered.

The following is an extract taken from the Fees Handbook (Submission of Doctoral Theses and Master's Dissertations) on rebates.  Refer to the Fees Handbook (No. 8.2) for the exact fee deadline dates.  Kindly note that these are not Faculty deadline dates, but fee deadline dates:

Revise and Resubmit

Where a student is required to revise and resubmit a thesis or dissertation the academic fee will be charged per quarter (ie. If the candidate must work for up to one quarter, he/she will pay 25% of the full fee; for up to two quarters, he/she will pay 50% of the full fee and so on). 

  • NOTE 1: Full annual fees will be billed from the date on which the student is notified to revise and resubmit, and any fee rebate will be processed on resubmission.
  • NOTE 2: International students who are required to revise and resubmit a dissertation or thesis and who need to re-register at the start of a new academic year, may have their international term fee pro-rated up-front where there is a clear indication from the supervisor that the student is expected to submit in a period shorter than a year.¬†

Should you be entitled to a rebate, this will only take effect once we know the outcome of your dissertation. 

CONTACT PERSON AT FACULTY OFFICE

Khaya Salman

021 650 5278

POSTGRADUATE ADMINISTRATORS IN THE DEPARTMENTS

The Postgraduate Administrators in the departments and their email addresses are:-

* Architecture, Planning & Geomatics: Naomi Gihwala

* Chemical Engineering:  Belinda Davids

* Civil Engineering: Rowen Geswindt

* Construction Economics & Management: Mareldia Fagodien

* Electrical Engineering: Nicole Moodley

* Mechanical Engineering: Denise Botha

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Master's Dissertation Information

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After consultation with the supervisor, a candidate hoping to graduate in March / September 2024 is required to first submit an Intention to Submit 6 - 8 weeks before uploading the dissertation for examination via PeopleSoft to the Faculty Office.

STEP 1 - Create the intention to submit service request via PeopleSoft.

  • Intention to Submit Form¬†
  • COMPG01a - Dissertation Open Access Suppression ¬†(if applicable)¬†

Please refer to the  Quick Reference Guide: Student Upload Intention to Submit.

Please check your PeopleSoft within a week to see if your service request was accepted or declined. If no action was taken, please contact the¬† Commerce ¬† Faculty Office¬† via¬† email:¬† [email protected] . ¬†

The guideline dates for submission of dissertations are:

  • Intention: 30 June 2023
  • Submission of dissertation: 25 August 2023
  • Submission of dissertation:¬†12 February 2024
  • Intention: 19 December 2023

Please read the notice about 2024 graduation

  • Students who submit their corrections by¬† 12:00 on 01 December¬†2023 and meet ¬† the requirements for their qualification ¬†may be able to attend a¬† graduation ceremony in¬†March 2024.
  • A letter of completion may be issued if required before the graduation ceremonies. Please get in touch with¬† [email protected] .

After consultation with the supervisor, a candidate hoping to graduate in March / September is required to submit via PeopleSoft to the Faculty Office:

STEP 2 - Create the upload thesis/dissertation service request via PeopleSoft .

  • Plagiarism Declaration
  • Declaration and Rebate Form
  • Dissertation¬†(you must include a signed declaration acknowledging that the dissertation is your own work)
  • A copy of your unofficial transcript from PeopleSoft

Please refer to the  Quick Reference Guide: Student Upload Thesis/Dissertation for Examination .

Please check your PeopleSoft within a week to see if your service request was accepted or declined. If no action was taken, please contact the¬† Commerce ¬†Faculty Office¬†via¬†email:¬† [email protected] . ¬†

In order to qualify for your Masters degree and be able to attend graduation, you must meet all the requirements for your degree, these may include but are not limited to:

  • Successfully completing your dissertation component
  • Passing all necessary coursework
  • ¬†A copy of the finalised dissertation is uploaded on PeopleSoft ‚Äst Library Upload Guide.

What does ‚Äėqualify‚Äô mean?

A student qualifies when he or she has met the requirements for the degree/diploma which is ratified by the FEC and approved by SEC. Graduation may take place weeks or even months after this approval process.  A student may apply for a transcript which will show that the qualification has been completed and that graduation will take place on a date sometime in the future. 

What does ‚Äėgraduate‚Äô mean?

A student graduates at a congregation of the University of Cape Town. That is, a graduation ceremony where the degree or diploma is conferred upon him/her. The graduation date appears on the certificate and transcript. Kindly note that the University of Cape Town does not undertake to reach a decision on the award of the degree by any specific date.  We will inform you once your examination process has been completed.

  • Please note that if you intend submitting your Master's dissertation for examination between December and before the academic term commences the following year, you will not be required to register.
  • If you submit your dissertation after the term commences¬†you must re-register by the date set out on the registration programme. If you do not register and you submit your dissertation for examination, your dissertation will not be sent off for examination until you have re-registered.

A rebate on the annual academic fee for a masters’ dissertation is granted in the second or subsequent year in which the dissertation is being completed.

Refer to the  Fees Handbook  (No. 8.2) for the exact fees and deadline dates.  Kindly note that these are not Faculty deadline dates, but fee deadline dates.

Where a student is required to revise and resubmit a thesis or dissertation the appropriate academic fee will apply (refer to Fees Handbook, No. 8.3):

  • Where a student is required to revise and resubmit a thesis or dissertation the academic fee will be charged per quarter (i.e. if the candidate must work for up to one quarter, the student will pay 25% of the full fee; for up to two quarters, he/she will pay 50% of the full fee and so on).
  • Note: Full annual fees will be billed from the date on which the student is notified to revise and resubmit and any fee rebate will be processed on resubmission.

Should you be entitled to a rebate, this will only take effect once we know the outcome of your dissertation.

Please email the  Commerce Faculty HDC  with any queries. 

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Library & Information Science Library Guide: Theses and Dissertations

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How to find a thesis in UCT Libraries

Masters and doctoral theses that have been submitted to UCT and  are available electronically via OpenUCT or PRIMO.     

In general, UCT Libraries does not keep Honours Theses although some specific Branch Libraries may do so, in which case they will appear in our catalogue:  departments often keep their own copies but these are not reflected in the Libraries' catalogue.  

To locate a particular thesis, search PRIMO, using either the author's name or the title of the thesis.

In cases where you need to consult a thesis that has been completed at another university in South Africa, you can request it through Inter-Library Loans.

There are a number of Electronic Theses and Dissertations databases that index theses and provide access to web-based full-text collections in South Africa and worldwide.

  • << Previous: Databases
  • Next: How to follow references >>
  • Last Updated: Mar 13, 2024 12:21 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.lib.uct.ac.za/librarianship

School for Advanced Legal Studies

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Mini-Dissertations

Research is core to the Faculty's Masters-level and PhD programmes. 

LLM and MPhil programmes with coursework and dissertation require a submisision of not more than 25,000 words. Although an original contribution to knowledge is always desirable in a minor dissertation/research paper, it is not an essential requirement. However, candidates must show that they have:

  • a thorough knowledge of the¬†chosen subject¬†
  • mastered techniques required for competent research in law
  • the capacity for independent thought and sound reasoning
  • satisfactorily presented the results of research.

The School for Advanced Legal Studies has developed guidelines for Masters-level dissertations   - read this booklet thoroughly before embarking on your research to understand details of:

  • What is Expected of a Minor Dissertation/Research Paper
  • Finding a Supervisor
  • Expectations and Responsibilities of Students and Supervisors
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Publication and Copyright
  • Language policy
  • Postgraduate Writing Centre
  • Guidelines on the Format of the Minor Dissertations/Research Paper
  • Guidelines on Language and Style
  • Submission and Examination Process
  • Important Contacts in the Law Faculty

We have also included here a copy of the Student Guide .

All students registered for a dissertation component must complete the Memorandum of Understanding at the point of registration on the online registration system. Returning students are required to complete the Annual Supplement to the Memorandum of Understanding  on the online system at the point of registration each academic year.

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Graduated Theses / Dissertations

  • Climate Services
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  • Kimutai, J. 2023 . Contribution of Anthropogenic Climate Change to the Magnitude of Extreme Rainfall Events and Associated Synoptic Conditions During Recent Flooding in Kenya . PhD supervised by M.New and P.Wolski.
  • Nyudwana, S. 2023 . Investigating the impacts of climate services among commercial and smallholder farmers to improve the uptake of climate information . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo , S. Lawal and T.S. Egbebiyi .
  • Mantshiyose, A. 2023 . Investigating weather information needs of smallholder farmers in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Steynor, A. 2023. Exploring the role of climate change risk perceptions in informing climate services for adaptation in East Africa. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and L. Pasquini. 
  • van Wyk, A. 2023 . The impact of projected climate change scenarios on the suitability of South Africa‚Äôs economically important fruit. University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Zvobgo, L. 2023. The role of indigenous and local knowledge on climate adaptation for smallholder farmers in Chiredzi, Zimbabwe. PhD supervised by P. Johnston , C.H Trisos and N.P Simpson. 
  • Dyers, G. 2022. Assessing the effectiveness of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process as a protective measure for indigenous plant species within the Sandveld area, from a conservation perspective . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by P. Johnston . 
  • Nkoma, T. 2022 . A Spatial Suitability Assessment of Maize and Tobacco in Response to Temperature and Rainfall Changes in Zimbabwe. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Chilambwe, A. 2021 . Modelling climate change impacts on maize and soybean yields in Central and Eastern Provinces of Zambia. University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Hall, A. 2021 . The Influence of Anthropogenic Climate Change on the 2015-2017 Hydrological Drought in the South-Western Cape, South Africa . University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by M. New and P. Wolski .
  • Joshi, N. 2021 . Future crop suitability assessment and the integration of Orphan crops into Kenya’s food systems. University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Makhanya, N.Z. 2021 . Potential impacts of climate change on hydrological droughts in the Limpopo river basin. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by P. Wolski and B. Abiodun.
  • Ngcamphalala, S. 2021 . Exploring adaptive policy management and evaluation for improved water resources management in the face of uncertainty and complexity in South Africa . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by O. Crespo and J. Louw.
  • Lee , J . 2021. On Non-epistemic Values in Climate Science for Decision support. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B.Hewitson , R. Jack and W.Parker.  
  • Parbhoo, T. 2021 . The Skill Assessment of Seasonal Wind Prediction in South Africa. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by C. Lennard .
  • Quagraine, K. 2021 . Dynamics of Co-Behavior of Climate Processes over Southern Africa. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson , C. Jack and C. Lennard .
  • Dlamini, L. 2020. Exploring the potential of using remote sensing data to model agricultural systems in data-limited areas. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Egbebiyi, T.S. 2020. Spatio-temporal effects of projected climate on future crop suitability over West Africa . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by O. Crespo and C. Lennard .
  • Ezekannagha, E. 2020. Assessing the climatic suitability of Bambara groundnut as an underutilised crop to future climate projections in Sikasso and S√©gou, Mali. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Fikileni, S. 2020. Implementation and Evaluation of the Pitman model in seasonal hydrological forecasting mode using the Kraai River catchmemt in Eastern Cape South Africa as a case study. University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by P. Wolski .
  • Hill, E. 2020 . A flood of communications in a drought: a frame analysis of the City of Cape Town’s communications during the 2017-2018 water crisis . Masters supervised by D. Scott and A. Taylor .
  • Karlie, M. 2020. Attribution of the 2015-2016 hydrological drought in KwaZulu-Natal to anthropogenic climate change. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by P. Wolski .
  • MacAlister, D. 2020 . Plant growth, stress tolerant traits and regulation of heat activated proteins in Aspalathus linearis (Burm. f.) R. Dahlgren exposed to elevated temperature and drought.  University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by A.M. Muasya, O. Crespo and S.B.M. Chimphango.
  • Makonya, G.M. 2020. Thermo and drought tolerance markers and regulation of heat stress proteins for chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.; Fabaceae) production in NE South Africa. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by S.B.M. Chimphango, O.J.B. Ogola, A.M. Muasya and O. Crespo .
  • Ramugondo, N. 2020. An investigation of the impacts of intra-seasonal rainfall variability on the maize growing season in Limpopo Province, South Africa from 1990-2014. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by O. Crespo and I. Pinto .
  • Williams, P.A. 2020 .  An integrated approach to climate vulnerability and adaptation assessment of smallholder production systems: evidence from horticultural production in Ghana. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by O. Crespo and M. Abu.
  • Gerstner, K. 2019 . Views and behaviours of municipal actors relating to climate change and water management: the case of local municipal water management and social networks . University of Cape Town.   Masters supervised by L. Pasquini .
  • Likoya, E. 2019. Attribution of the risk of extreme flood events to climate change in the context of changing land use and cover: case study of the shire river basin flood of 2015. University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by P. Wolski .
  • Mkuhlani, S. 2019 . Integration of seasonal forecast information and crop models to enhance decision making in small-scale farming systems of South Africa . University of Cape Town .  PhD supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Pelaez, A.J.P. 2019. Contesting transdisciplinary climate knowledge: a decolonial perspective on the FRACTAL project in Windhoek, Namibia. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by D. Scott and A. McClure .
  • Rusere, F. 2019 . Assessing the value of ecological intensification in improving smallholder farmers‚Äô food security and rural livelihoods in a changing climate . University of Cape Town.   PhD supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Kent, M. 2018 . A mode-based metric for evaluating global climate models . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and C. Jack .
  • Mukunga, T. 2018. Evaluation of the potential changes in South Africa‚Äôs future synoptic wind climate. Masters supervised by C. Lennard .
  • Brown, A. 2017 . A historical perspective on wind data: time, space and vector relationships between ship log data and Cape Royal Astronomical Observatory wind data between 1834 and 1854 . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by  C. Lennard  and S. Grab.
  • Cook, D. 2017 . Small scale farmers utilization and perceptions of Bambara groundnut production in South Africa: a case study in a semi-arid region of Limpopo . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by L. Pereira and P. Johnston .
  • Endris, H. 2017 . Assessing the representation of teleconnective drivers of rainfall over Eastern Africa in global and regional climate models and projected future changes . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and  C. Lennard .
  • Mauck, B. 2017 . The capacity of the Cape Flats aquifer and its role in water sensitive urban design in Cape Town . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by K. Winter and P. Wolski .
  • Argent, B. 2016 . An exploration of South Africa’s wind climate using station records and reanalysis data . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson ,  C. Lennard and A. Hahmann.
  • Gicheru, M. 2016 . Barriers and enablers to uptake and implementation of system of rice intensification: a case study of Mwea irrigation scheme in Kenya . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by P. Johnston and MA. Baudoin.
  • Mdoka, M. 2016 . The role of soil moisture on summer climate simulations over southern Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • Zinyengere, N. 2016 . Assessing climate change impacts and agronomic adaptation strategies for dryland crop production in southern Africa . University of Cape Town.   PhD supervised by B. Hewitson , M. Tadross and O. Crespo .
  • Conradie, W. 2015 . Conceptualising and quantifying the nonlinear, chaotic climate: implications for climate model experimental design . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by B. Abiodun and J. Daron and T. Hauser.
  • Giermek, M. 2015. Analysing peak flow attenuation in an urban wetland . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by K. Winter and P. Wolski .
  • Lawal, K. 2015 . Understanding the variability and predictability of seasonal climates over West and Southern Africa using climate models . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Abiodun and D. Stone .
  • Lotter, J. 2015 . Potential implications of climate change for Rooibos (A. linearis) production and distribution in the greater Cederberg region, South Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by E. Van Garderen, M. Tadross and A. Valentine.
  • Meque, A. 2015 . Investigating the link between southern African droughts and global atmospheric teleconnections using regional climate models . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Abiodun and B. Hewitson .
  • Nthakomwa, A. 2015 . Assessing the role of weather index insurance in climate change adaptation in Malawi . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by O. Crespo and J. Daron .
  • Osima, S. 2015 . Understanding a high resolution regional climate model’s ability in simulating tropical East Africa climate variability and change . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Stendel.
  • Pinto, I. 2015 . Future changes in extreme rainfall events and circulation patterns over southern Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by C. Lennard , M. Tadross and B. Hewitson .
  • Somanje, A. 2015 . Climate change adaptation measures in agriculture : a case of conservation agriculture for small-scale farmers in Kalomo District of Zambia . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by O. Crespo .
  • Araujo, J. 2014 . Impact of drought on grape yields in the Western Cape, South Africa . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by B. Abiodun and O. Crespo .
  • Kloppers, P. 2014 .  Investigating the relationships between wheat-specific rainfall characteristics, large-scale modes of climate variability and wheat yields in the Swartland region, South Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by P. Johnston and M. Tadross .
  • Ogier, D.B . 2014. Characteristics of inertial gravity waves over Southern Africa as simulated with CAM-EULAG. Masters supervised by B. Abiodun.
  • Ma√ļre, G. 2013 . Effects of biomass-burning aerosol loading on Southern African climate . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by M. Tadross and B. Hewitson .
  • Morison, D. 2013 . The synoptic drivers of extreme rainfall in South Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and C. Lennard .
  • Nchaba, T. 2013 . Verification of gridded seasonal wind speed forecasts over South Africa. University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by A. Marquard and C. Lennard .
  • Wallace, M. 2013 . Modelling the impact of future climate change on subregional wheat production in the Western Cape . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by M. Tadross .
  • Jack, C. 2012 . A Lagrangian moisture source attribution model and analysis of southern Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Waagsaether, K. 2012 . Preparing for the future: assessing the vulnerability of small-scale farmers in Bushbuckridge . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by P. Johnston and G. Ziervogel.
  • Hachigonta, S. 2011 . Assessing maize water requirements in the context of climate change uncertainties over southern Africa . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • Kent, M. 2011 . The value of independent component analysis in identifying climate processes . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and D. Stone .
  • Pinto, I. 2011 . Future changes in extreme events in Mozambique as simulated using the PRECIS regional climate modeling system . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by M. Tadross and B. Hewitson .
  • Tummon, F. 2011 . Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects on the southern African regional climate during the austral winter season . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by F. Solmon, M. Tadross and B. Hewitson .
  • Gbobaniyi, E. 2010 . Transferability of regional climate models over different climatic domains . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and B. Abiodun.
  • Kalognomou, E. 2009 . Air quality and climate change in the greater Cape Town area . University of Cape Town.  Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • Carter, S. 2008 . Approaches to quantifying and reducing uncertainty in GCMs over Southern Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Coop, L. 2008 . The diurnal cycle of cloud cover over southern and central Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • Hagemann, K. 2008 . Mesoscale wind atlas of South Africa . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Johnston, P. 2008 . The uptake and utility of seasonal forecasting products for commercial maize farmers in South Africa . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Lennard, C. 2008 . Identification and simulation of extreme precipitation using a computationally inexpensive methodology . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • MacKellar, N. 2007 . Simulating the effects of land-surface change on southern Africa’s climate . University of Cape Town.  PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • Mukheibir, P. 2007 . Water, climate change and small towns . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by S. Parnell and B. Hewitson .
  • Barrable, A. 2005 . Climate change effects on land degradation and agriculture in the Swartland, South Africa . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Meadows.
  • Mdoka, M. 2005 . Climatic trends and soil moisture feedbacks over Zimbabwe . University of Cape Town . Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Tadross .
  • ‚Äč Drew, G. 2004 . Modelling vegetation dynamics and their feedbacks over Southern Africa in response to climate change forcing . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson and G. Midgley.
  • Steynor, A. 2004 . The impact of global climate change on the runoff and ecological sustainability of the Breede River . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and E. Archer.
  • Walawege, R. 2002 . An examination of the spatially extensive heavy precipitation events over South Africa and the associated moisture trajectories . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Mulock-Houwer, A. 2001 . Late quaternary environmental reconstruction and climate modelling in the winter rainfall region of the Western Cape, South Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and M. Meadows.
  • Young, S. 2001 . Effects of global climate change on the recruitment of Anchovy in the Southern Benguela upwelling system . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and A. Richardson.
  • Kruger, A. 1999 . The relationship between ENSO, seasonal rainfall, and circulation patterns in South Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson and W. Landman.
  • Hudson, D. 1998 . Antarctic sea-ice extent, Southern hemisphere circulation and South African rainfall . University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Main, J. 1997 . Seasonality of circulation in southern Africa using the Kohonen self-organising map . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson .
  • Shannon, D. 1997 . Atmosphere-vegetation interactions over South Africa . University of Cape Town. Masters supervised by B. Hewitson.

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Odendaal, Rehana. ‚ÄúWits Imagined: An Investigation into Wits University‚Äôs Public Roles and Responsibilities, 1922-1993‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2020.

This thesis examines the public roles and responsibilities of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg in the period 1922-1994. It does this through a close investigation of four moments in the history of the University, namely the foundation of Wits (1910s and 1920s); early debates about the entry of Black staff and students (1930s and 1940s); the Academic Freedom protests (starting in the mid-1950s) and the formation of the Wits History Workshop (from 1977 to the early 1990s). In each of these moments, social roles and perceptions of public responsibility were actively asserted or challenged through engagements between internal-university constituencies and external communities.¬†¬†The thesis identifies three core roles for Wits University over this period: providing technical and professional training; generating and authenticating expert knowledge and shaping people‚Äôs ideas of citizenship. The practical and conceptual understandings of these three roles, however, have shifted over time as the University‚Äôs conceptualisation of the communities it serves has changed. These shifts have happened in conversation with different civic and state actors. The thesis has found that ideas of the public roles of Wits are informed by an institutional sense of self-referential authority accumulated through various moments and practices in the University‚Äôs history. This self-referential authority depends on a selective recalling of particular events and the ability of multiple narratives about the University‚Äôs identity to circulate simultaneously. This self-referential authority draws on Wits‚Äô origins as an institution of late-Imperial modernity and its legacy as a so-called ‚Äėopen‚Äô university. Understanding the practices and legacies that have created these narratives through an examination of the University‚Äôs history, is particularly important in the present moment when the future public responsibilities of South African universities are being vigorously questions and debated.

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32899

Fagan, Henry Allan. ‚ÄúThe Wider KwaZulu-Natal Region circa 1700 to the onset of Colonialism: A critical Essay on Sources and Historiography‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2020.

This dissertation is an extended essay dealing with historical productions on the late independent era (the late ‚Äúpre-colonial‚ÄĚ epoch) of the wider KwaZulu-Natal region. The project pays particular attention to the development of the historiography and examines how it has shaped and in turn been shaped by the source material over time. Attention is also drawn to issues with terminology and disciplinary convention, including the distinction which is traditionally made between ‚Äėprimary‚Äô and ‚Äėsecondary‚Äô sources. The dissertation‚Äôs scope extends beyond the discipline of history to interrogate how influences from the fields of anthropology, art history, archaeology, and literary criticism have shaped the production of history. It also examines the productions of African intellectuals whose works were excluded from the discipline of history during the late colonial and apartheid eras.¬† Among other things, this essay draws attention to historiographical breaks in the literature and considerers where paradigm shifts and epistemic ruptures can be discerned.

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32619

Zaayman, Carine. ‚ÄúSeeing What Is not There: Figuring the Anarchive‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2019.

Absences in archives render as impossible access to the fullness of the past. Yet, within the post-apartheid sociopolitical milieu, demands are made of the slivers of evidence in colonial archives to yield more than they contain, to provide material from which counter-colonial narratives may be fashioned. I understand these demands as pressure exerted on archives. In this thesis, I consider this pressure in relation to historical narrations of the lives of two women from the colonial period of the Cape: Krotoa and Anne. Krotoa was a Goringhaicona woman who acted as an interpreter between the Dutch and the Khoekhoe in the early colonial period at the Cape (from 1652). I examine extant literature on Krotoa to show the various ways in which authors have responded to the pressure on the archives in which she appears and how they have dealt with absences within them. I then discuss a number of instances in the archives to demonstrate that the imprint of absence is clearly visible in these archives. Anne was a Scottish noblewoman who lived at the Cape from 1797 to 1802. I investigate the literature about Anne to show how scholars have responded to the pressure on her archive primarily by overlooking the absences within it. I then consider two aspects of Anne‚Äôs archive to demonstrate that it, too, bears the imprint of absence. In contrast to approaches to absence that seek to fill in the gaps in archives, I argue that paying attention to the imprints of absence enables us to begin to grasp something of absence in its own right, that is, the negative space of an archive that constitutes a form of absolute absence. I have named this absolute absence in archives the ‚Äúanarchive‚ÄĚ. Identifying the imprints of absences as indicative of the anarchive has led me to instantiate the anarchive through figuration. This is achieved via visual art methodologies in which I systematically avoid reconstruction and instead convene an archive of photographs whose subject, and the curatorial rationale behind their display, is emptiness and transience. My figuring situates the anarchive centre stage and proposes engagement with it as a means of escaping the constraints of archives. When the full extent of the anarchive is brought into view, the limitations of archives are sharply delineated and their ability to control our understanding of the past is rendered absurd. ¬†

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/31019

De Greef, Erica. ‚ÄúSartorial disruption: an investigation of the histories, dispositions, and related museum practices of the dress/fashion collections at Iziko Museums as a means to re-imagine and re-frame the sartorial in the museum‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2019.

In this thesis I investigate and interrogate the historical and current compositions, conditions and dispositions of three collections containing sartorial objects of three formerly separate museums ‚Äď the South African Museum, the South African National Gallery and the South African Cultural History Museum. Although these three museums were amalgamated in 1999, along with eight other Western Cape institutions to form Iziko Museums, each separate sartorial ‚Äėcollection‚Äô retains the effects of the divergent museal practices imposed on its objects over time. I employ the concept of ‚Äėfashion‚Äô in this thesis both to refer to the objects of the study, as well as to the socially-determined set of ideas and ideals surrounding notions such as taste, aesthetics, belonging and modernity. Sartorial objects in museums present strong physical evidence of both deeply personal and extremely public relationships as the traces of and capacity for embodiment imbue these objects with metonymic, subjective and archival capacities. In addition, I employ the contracted form dress/fashion to trouble the commonly held separate notions of ‚Äėfashion‚Äô as a modern, dynamic and largely Western system, and ‚Äėdress‚Äô as ‚Äėtraditional‚Äô and an unchanging African sartoriality. I contend that through the terms ‚Äėdress‚Äô and ‚Äėfashion‚Äô ‚Äď two opposing and segregating tropes still largely present in South African museums ‚Äď the forms of agency, mutability and historicity applied to Western ‚Äėfashion‚Äô objects, have been and continue to be denied in the collection, classification and curation of African ‚Äėdress‚Äô. I use a sartorial focus to unpack the development of and conditions pertaining to each of the museums in this study, namely an ethnographic museum, a cultural history museum and a fine arts museum. I interrogate the three separate phases of dress/fashion objects in these museums, that is, their entry into the collections, their classification and their display. Following each historical investigation, I use a single object-focused strategy to reflect on the specific conditions, dispositions and limitations of these three separate sartorial ‚Äėarchives‚Äô. I choose to identify and analyse all the trousers found across the three collections (as well as some significant examples that were excluded), as these particular sartorial objects both reflect and offer critical insights into distinct, and often divisive, definitions of gender, politics and socio-cultural attitudes, many of which also changed over time. I offer close readings of a number of trousers (both in and absent from these collections) that make evident the ways in which these divisions have been scripted into the taxonomies, disciplines and exhibitions at Iziko Museums. These practical and conceptual divisions perpetuate the artificial segregation of these museum objects. The divisions are also reflective of wider divisive museal practices that persist despite the efforts of Iziko Museums to transform and integrate their practices and their collections. Drawing on the sartorial as an alternative archive I am able to show the types of histories avowed and disavowed by different museal practices. In addition, the close readings expose the distinct and persistent colonial and apartheid underpinnings of sartorial classification and representation across the three Iziko Museums‚Äô collections almost twenty years after the merger. The trousers readings furthermore, make a number of decolonial affordances evident, as the objects reflect not only alternate histories, but also shared pasts prompting alternative contemporary interpretations. Via the dress/fashion collections, this thesis offers a sartorial approach to ‚Äėdecolonising‚Äô the museum. This includes both a reframing of various museal practices and principles, and a contemporary re-imagining of histories and their related identity narratives. Despite contemporary critiques and attempts to transform the disciplinary practices, and various cultural and social distinctions still present in the collections and exhibitions at Iziko Museums, segregation and problematic hierarchies still persist. I show how when considered as an archive, the sartorial makes evident other histories, relationships and interpretations. This approach can contribute towards a new, interdisciplinary dress/fashion museology as both a means of disruption and revision at Iziko Museums, contributing towards new contemporary capacities to curate the sartorial offering alternate, decolonial interpretations of past, present and future South African identity narratives. ¬†

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/30393

Mahashe, Tebogo George. ‚ÄúMaBareBare, a rumour of a dream‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2019.

This multi-part PhD submission builds on Premesh Lalu‚Äôs (2009) assertion that an understanding of the subjectivity of the colonised is irrecoverable from the colonial archive. It does this through my quest for, and my encounter with, fragments associated with an episode of travel to Berlin by some Balobedu in 1897 and, subsequently, by myself in the present. This confrontation with the archive facilitates a meditation on an idea of khelobedu, as a subject effectively trapped by classical anthropology struggling to understand it (khelobedu) as a contemporary reality. Khelobedu is, amongst other things, the language and religion of Balobedu from north-eastern Limpopo province in South Africa. It is used in this PhD project as a conceptual tool to express the complexity inherent in the multiple subjectivities that I inhabit, encounter, respond to and mobilise; that, effectively, I practice. I adopt a range of creative fine art methods to engage khelobedu outside of the prescribed and constraining methodologies of established academic disciplines historically developed as appropriate for the study of African cultural life. My methods involve travelling, dreaming and creative practice as process. Travel has entailed my journeys to Berlin to consult colonial archives related to Balobedu, as well as wider travel to other places (such as Dakar) to visit contemporary art institutions and attend key events profiling my chosen artistic methodologies. I have employed Balobedu dream practices as a way of understanding, and claiming, Balobedu subjectivity, as premised on political agency and opacity. The methodology of creative practice has necessitated the making and staging of art exhibitions and installations within the contemporary art circuit; and persistent documentation of my installations and travels (conversations, cafe encounters and so forth) as artistic process as well as of the demands of practice as a subject itself ‚ÄĒ specifically instituting several iterations of a camera obscura installation as a response to my dissatisfaction with the documentary impulse that I understand to 'trap‚Äô khelobedu. These methodologies emphasise the idea of play and participation aimed at forming a habit of practice. They collectively contribute to the PhD project as both diagnostic of, and a way of challenging and offering a resolution to, the problem of coloniality in the academy. These processes of practice reiterate that the subjectivity of Balobedu is not just to be sought in the colonial archive but persists, and is recoverable, in contemporary Balobedu such as myself. Through the practices at the heart of this PhD project, I establish that my being a Molobedu cannot be separated from my positions as artist and academic, and so insist on an understanding of Balobedu as contemporaneous, always 'in time‚Äô with all of time‚Äôs complexities, recognisable to contemporary subjectivities. The imperative to resist coloniality and to risk a departure from the conventions of the PhD in order to imagine and express khelobedu determines the form of the thesis as an open-ended proposition, emphasising practice and, for now, provisionality.

 Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/30544

Ramji, Himal. ‚ÄúProducing the Precolonial: Professional and Popular Lives of Mapungubwe, 1932-2017‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2018.

This thesis tells a history of the production of the object that is ‚ÄėMapungubwe‚Äô, and, in turn, explores what meaning Mapungubwe has been made to impart into the concept of the ‚Äėprecolonial‚Äô. Methodologically, I take the past as fundamentally¬† lost , and history as a recoupment of this loss: history as a¬† discovery . History writing, then, is an act of discovery in which the loss itself is created ‚Äď a loss to match a reciprocal discovery. With each different mode of loss and discovery, we encounter new subjects or agencies, able to navigate through the processes of making Mapungubwe. In this, ‚Äėprofessional‚Äô and ‚Äėamateur‚Äô history can be explored for their subjectivity to conditioning regimes of knowledge, without giving sanctity to professional (archaeological, historical or scientific) knowledge.¬†

The work is divided into three parts, each dealing with a different ripple in the making of Mapungubwe. The first chapter covers the archaeological production of Mapungubwe, from the first excavational work in the 1930s, until more recent work, during the 2010s. During the 20 th  century, the topic of Mapungubwe, indeed the topic of the African past was cloistered in academic archaeology, particularly around the University of Pretoria. It is only after the end of apartheid that Mapungubwe beings to open up, at which time it is taken up by the state, and integrated into multiple educational and heritage projects. The second chapter looks at the introduction and progression of Mapungubwe in the South African national history education curriculum after 2003, at which time it is also made a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the Order of Mapungubwe. The chapter analyses the narrative presentation of Mapungubwe in the existing curriculum, and through what conceptual devices this narrative is constructed. The third chapter discusses the explosion of Mapungubwe into popular discourses, about a decade after its implementation in the education and processual concretisation as heritage. This deals with the dominant narratives, symbolic and conceptual sets (mnemonic infrastructures), and cultured thematics through which Mapungubwe is entered into the popular sphere.  

I make use of sources from various different disciplines, including archaeology, history, politics, education and history education, literary theory, fictive writing, sculpture, poetry, and touristic longform writing and advertising. The thesis has methodological and topical significance. I use ‚Äėloss‚Äô as a conceptual category in the analysis of history writing, that allows for a consideration of the breadth of public productivity in recouping the past. In this engagement with loss/discovery, I displace the sanctity of science, so as to consciously consider the representations of Mapungubwe in popular spheres, which have not yet been taken seriously. Finally, it is also to give some idea about the power ascribed to Mapungubwe as an event, a rupture in the precolonial, giving meaning and nuance to the period in history, which becomes constitutive of our contemporary understandings of the world, past and present, flung into the future.

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/32365

Bloch, Joanne. ‚ÄúLetting things speak: a case study in the reconfiguring of a South African institutional object collection‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2016.

In this thesis I examine the University of Cape Town (UCT) Manuscripts and Archives Department object collection, providing insights into the origins of the collection and its status within the archive. Central to the project was my application of a set of creative and affective strategies as a response to the collection, that culminated in a body of artwork entitled Slantways, shown at the Centre for African Studies (CAS) Gallery at UCT in 2014.The collection of about 200 slightly shabby, mismatched artefacts was assembled by R.F.M. Immelman, University Librarian from 1940 until 1970, who welcomed donations of any material he felt would be of value to future scholars. Since subsequent custodians have accorded these things, with their taint of South Africa's colonial past, rather less status, for many years they held an anomalous position within the archive, devalued and marginalised, yet still well-cared for. The thesis explores the ways in which an interlinked series of oblique or slantways conceptual and methodological strategies can unsettle conventional understandings of these archival things, the history with which they are associated, and the archive that houses them. I show how such an unsettling facilitates a complex and subtle range of understandings of the artefacts themselves, and reveals the constructed and contingent nature of the archive, as well as its biases, lacunae and limitations in ways that conventional approaches focusing on its evidentiary function allow to remain hidden. This set of slantways strategies includes the use of a cross-medial creative approach, and my focus on an a-typical, marginalised and taxonomy-free collection. Also important is the incorporation of my visual impairment as avital influence on my artwork, leading to an emphasis both on unusual forms of seeing and on the senses of smell, touch and hearing. Furthermore, my choice to follow a resolutely thing-centred approach led me to engage very closely with the artefacts' materiality, and subsequently with their actancy as archival things, which in turn influenced my conceptual and creative choices.  

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/20272

Mhlambi, Thokozani Ndumiso. ‚ÄúEarly radio broadcasting in South Africa: culture, modernity & technology‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2015.

This thesis tells the story of the events that led to a broadcasting culture in South Africa. It then proceeds to show how listeners were gradually brought into the radio community, notwithstanding all the prejudices of the time. Africans were the last ones to be considered for broadcasting, this was now in a time of crisis, during the Second World War. Through a look at the cultural landscape of the time, the thesis uncovers the making of radio in South Africa, and shows how this process of making was deeply contested, often with vexing contradictions in ideas about race, segregation and point of view. The thesis is useful to scholars of history, culture and, more importantly, of music, as it lays the necessary groundwork for in-depth explorations of music styles played and the African artists who grew out of broadcasting activities. In its appeal to a broader audience of literate and illiterate, it sparked the formation of a South African listening public. It also facilitated the presence and domestication of the radio-set within the African home. Radio could account for a whole world out there in the presence of one's home, therefore actively situating African listeners into a modern- global imaginary of listeners. By bringing news from faraway places nearer, radio was a new kind of colonial modern encounter as it sought to redefine the nature of the local. The thesis therefore understands broadcasting as part of those technological legacies through which, in line with V Y Mudimbe (1988: xi), "African worlds have been established as realities for knowledge." Technology therefore appears as a recurring theme throughout this thesis. The primary material was gathered using archival methods. In the absence of an audio archive of recordings of the early broadcasts, the thesis relies to a large extent on written resources and interviews.  

Link:  https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/17260

Van Rensburg (n√©e Brown), Jessica Natasha. ‚ÄúEthics of the dust: on the care of a university art collection‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2015.

This thesis examines the University of Cape Town (UCT) Permanent Works of Art Collection in order to determine its relevance to, and status within, the university. The text traces the historical and current roles of the university art collection in general, before focusing specifically on the UCT art collection‚Äôs history, including the contexts, events and personalities which shaped its development, from its embryonic beginnings in 1911, to the present. In an era which demands clear correlations between the allocation of resources and relevance to institutional goals, the contemporary university collection is under pressure to demonstrate its potential as a useful educational and interpretive tool within the university (the so-called ‚Äėtriple mission‚Äô of collections: teaching, research and public display), or risk being consigned to obsolescence, even destruction. Based on a survey of the UCT art collection‚Äôs holdings, interviews, and a combination of bibliographic and archival research, undertaken between 2011and 2014, the thesis establishes that, whereas most university collections were traditionally constituted for the purpose of teaching and research, or for the preservation and exhibition of historical artefacts pertaining to a university and/or a specific discipline, this collection does not precisely fulfil either function. ¬†

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/13651

Mataga, Jesmael. ‚ÄúPractices of pastness, postwars of the dead, and the power of heritage: museums, monuments and sites in colonial and post-colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-2010‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2014.

This thesis examines the meanings, significances, and roles of heritage across the colonial and postcolonial eras in Zimbabwe. The study traces dominant ideas about heritage at particular periods in Zimbabwean history, illustrating how heritage has been deployed in ways that challenge common or essentialised understandings of the notion and practice of heritage. The study adds new dimensions to the understanding of the role of heritage as an enduring and persistent source terrain for the negotiation and creation of authority, as well as for challenging it, linked to regimes and the politics of knowledge. This work is part of an emerging body of work that explores developments over a long stretch of time, and suggests that what we have come to think of as heritage is a project for national cohesion, a marketable cultural project, and also a mode of political organisation and activity open for use by various communities in negotiating contemporary challenges or effecting change. While normative approaches to heritage emphasise the disjuncture between the precolonial, colonial and postcolonial periods, or between official and non-official practices, results of this study reveal that in practice, there are connections in the work that heritage does across these categories. Findings of the study shows a persistent and extraordinary investment in the past, across the eras and particularly in times of crises, showing how heritage practices move across landscapes, monuments, dispersed sites, and institutionalised entities such as museums. The thesis also points to a complex relationship between official heritage practices and unofficial practices carried out by local communities. To demonstrate this relationship, it traces the emergence of counter-heritage practices, which respond to and challenge the official conceptualisations of heritage by invoking practices of pastness, mobilised around reconfigured archaeological sites, human remains, ancestral connections, and sacred sites. Counter-heritage practices, undertaken by local communities, challenge hegemonic ideas about heritage embedded in institutionalised heritage practices and they contribute to the creation of alternative practices of preservation. I propose that attention to the relationship between institutionalised heritage practices and community-held practices helps us to think differently about the role of local communities in defining notions of heritage, heritage preservation practices and in knowledge production.

 Link:  https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/12843

Dodd, Alexandra Jane. ‚ÄúSecular s√©ance: Post-Victorian embodiment in contemporary South African art‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2014.

In this thesis I explore selected bodies of work by five contemporary South African artists that resuscitate nineteenth - century aesthetic tropes in ways that productively reimagine South Africa’s traumatic colonial inheritance. I investigate the aesthetic strategies and thematic concerns employed by Mary Sibande, Nicholas Hlobo, Mwenya Kabwe, Kathryn Smith and Santu Mofokeng, and argue that the common tactic of engagement is a focus on the body as the prime site of cognition and "the aesthetic as a form of embodiment, mode of being-in-the-world" (Merleau - Ponty). It is by means of the body that the divisive colonial fictions around race and gender were intimately inscribed and it is by means of the body, in all its performative and sensual capacities, that they are currently being symbolically undone and re-scripted. In my introduction, I develop a syncretic, interdisciplinary discourse to enable my close critical readings of these post-Victorian artworks. My question concerns the mode with which these artists have reached into the past to resurrect the nineteenth - century aesthetic trope or fragment, and what their acts of symbolic retrieval achieve in the public realm of the present. What is specific to these artists mode of "counter - archival" (Merewether ) engagement with the colonial past? I argue that these works perform a similar function to the nineteenth - century séance and to African ancestral rites and dialogue, putting viewers in touch with the most haunting aspects of our shared and separate histories as South Africans and as humans. In this sense, they might be understood both as recuperations of currently repressed forms of cultural hybridity and embodied visual conversations with the unfinished identity struggles of the artists’ ancestors. The excessive, uncanny or burlesque formal qualities of these works insist on the incapacity of mimetic, social documentary forms to contain the sustained ferocious absurdity of subjective experience in a "post - traumatic", "post - colonial", "post - apartheid" culture. The "post" in these terms does not denote a concession to sequential logic or linear temporality, but rather what Achille Mbembe terms an "interlocking of presents, pasts and futures". This "interlocking" is made manifest by the current transmission of these works, which visually, physically embody a sense of subjectivity as temporality. If the body and the senses are the means though which we not only apprehend the world in the present, but through which the past is objectively an d subjectively enshrined, then it is by means of the ossified archive of that same sensory body that the damage of the past can be released and knowledge/history re - imagined. Without erasing or denying South Africa’s well - documented history of violent categorisation, the hypothetical tenor of these works instantiates an alternate culture of love , intimacy, desire and inter - connectedness that once was and still can be.  

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/12814

Putter, Andrew. ‚ÄúNative work: an impulse of tenderness‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2013.

Native Work is an installation-artwork consisting of 38 portrait photographs. It was made in response to an encounter with the archive of Alfred Martin Duggan-Cronin’s photographs of black southern Africans taken between 1919 and 1939. In its creative focus on traditional black South African culture in a post-apartheid context, Native Work is one of a series of related - but independent - projects occurring contemporaneously with it in the city of Cape Town (a situation examined more closely in the conclusion to this document: see p. 33). Native Work is motivated by a desire for social solidarity - a desire which emerges as a particular kind of historical possibility in the aftermath of apartheid. As such, it finds inspiration in Duggan-Cronin’s commitment to affirm the lives of those black South Africans who many of his peers would have dismissed as unworthy subjects of such attention. Native Work echoes that commitment by staying close to an impulse of tenderness discernible in Duggan-Cronin’s life-long project, and pays homage not only to Duggan-Cronin, but also to the expressive life of those who appeared in his work.  

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13994

Shoro, Kathleho Kano. ‚ÄúTerms of engaging and project-ing Africa (ns): an ethnographic encounter with African studies through Curate Africa‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2013.

In May 2012 Curate Africa - an ongoing project centered on photography and curation in Africa - was pre-launched at the University of Cape Town (UCT) within the University's Africa Month Celebrations. The project aimed- conceptually and visually - to re-imagine, re-image and re-envision Africa from within Africa and through the lenses of Africans. While this research began as an examination of Curate Africa, the project became a heuristic device through which I began exploring how UCT, on a day-to-day basis, negotiated and continues to negotiate its African identity. In this respect, this dissertation illustrates how Curate Africa and its project leaders - who are also academics within the University - problematised the study and representation of Africa through the intentions of their project, through their individual scholarly pursuits - where they attempt to reimagine the study of Africa(ns) and through the tight scholarly networks that they formed through their scholarly inclinations. Furthermore, this dissertation offers an historical account of the African Studies at UCT as well as an ethnographic account of how the developments and debates around the formation of the "New School" (2012) and around UCT's Afropolitan ambition unfolded within the University and affected those operating in the departments concerned. The principle argument within this dissertation is that projects, however flexible and decolonial in intention, cannot escape being projections of the project leaders' imaginings. Furthermore, projections and ideas of Africa (Mudimbe, 1994) are shaped by perceiving Africa from particular vantage points and within particular contexts laden with histories and complex presents. Perceptions of what "Africa" means and in the case of this research what postcolonial African Studies means continue to be debated from different vantage points within UCT. By and large, this ethnography therefore articulates the scale and challenges of knowledge production centred on the continent in general but, more specifically, the complexities embedded in knowledge production that seeks to be decolonial in its very nature.  

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6794

McNulty, Grant. ‚ÄúCustodianship on the periphery: archives, power and identity politics in post-apartheid Umbumbulu, KwaZulu-Natal‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2013.

Since 1994, there have been significant shifts in official systems of record-keeping in South Africa. Notions of tradition and custom have been reconfigured within a legislative environment and in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, what was previously held separately as the domain of the 'tribal subject' (tradition and custom) now intersects with the domain of the democratic citizen (legislation, government records and archives). The intersection of these domains has opened up new cultural and political spaces in which the past in various forms is being actively managed. Through a study of contemporary Umbumbulu in southern KwaZulu-Natal, this thesis explores a host of custodial and record-keeping forms and practices, often in settings not conventionally associated with custodianship and archives. The study takes as its point of departure the Ulwazi Programme, a web initiative of the eThekwini Municipality that its advocates term a collaborative, online, indigenous knowledge resource. It then considers various other locations in Umbumbulu in which the past is being dealt with by certain traditional leaders and local historians such as Desmond Makhanya and Siyabonga Mkhize. The thesis argues that the activities of the subjects of the study reveal a blurred distinction between practices of custodianship and the production of versions of history and posits that they might be best described as practices of curation. Their activities show that the past, in a range of forms, is being mobilised in efforts to gain access to land and government resources, and to enter into the record marginalised historical claims and materials. Moreover, the types of knowledge that flow from their activities at a local level serve to unsettle dominant modes of knowing, including those related to custodianship, archives and identity, and they shape socio-political relations, with amongst others, the Zulu royal family and the Premier of KwaZulu-Natal. The thesis advances the argument that in contemporary KwaZulu-Natal the terms, and the act, of consignation of depositing materials in a repository, out of public circulation and with limited access an action that enables both remembering and, once preserved, the possibility of forgetting, far from being a defined, archival procedure, is a tenuous, volatile, indeed actively negotiated and navigated, process.  

Link: https://fhya.org/AdditionalResources/file/id/189140?subquery=mcnulty

Kashe-Katya, Xolelwa. ‚ÄúCarefully hidden away: excavating the archive of the Mapungubwe dead and their possessions‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2013.

Ever since Jerry Van Graan first stumbled upon golden artefacts in 1933, Mapungubwe - an Iron Age civilisation that existed in the confluence of the Shashe and Limpopo rivers between 900 and 1300 AD - has been the subject of contestation. Initially knowledge production about Mapungubwe was informed by the need to make a case for the late arrival of Bantu-speaking people in Southern Africa ? a now discredited theory used to justify the subjugation of Africans. In the post-apartheid era, Mapungubwe became a focal point for a new form of myth-building: the myth of liberation and a romantic past but, in my view, with a neo-liberal bias. In this dissertation I interrogate the role played by the disciplines of archaeology and physical anthropology in the political contestation that has surrounded Mapungubwe, focusing on the production of knowledge. I do this by investigating the claim that Mapungubwe was shrouded or hidden away. In particular, I ask: What happens when disciplinary workings, in the course of knowledge production, construe an archive? What do museums, archives and other memory institutions hide and what do they reveal? What gets acknowledged as archive and what is disregarded? How is this knowledge presented in the public domain over time? Lastly, what happens when the archive is construed differently? My interrogation lays bare the continued discomfort and improvisation that prevails among those disciplines or institutions that engage with Mapungubwe. I have chosen to organise the core chapters of the thesis according to specific timeframes: before apartheid, during apartheid and after apartheid. This is done to demonstrate how archaeology, claimed as a science, was a powerful strategy deployed to exchange the messiness for the "true" knowledge of the past. The research on Mapungubwe, by way of the Greefswald Archaeological Project, was the most prolonged research project in the history of South Africa. Its four research phases, which began in 1933 and ended in 2000, mutated as the broader political landscape shifted. As a result, everything that can possibly play itself out in broader post-apartheid South Africa is present in Mapungubwe: contested claims, racial history, land dispossession, apartheid and the military, repatriation, post-apartheid claims, nationalism, pan-Africanism, ethnicity and more. This thesis demonstrates how the disciplinary practices of archaeology were instrumental in keeping Mapungubwe shrouded. An example of this "shrouding" is the deployment of highly technical language in writing about Mapungubwe. Before the end of apartheid, this epistemic hiding offered a convenient retreat for the discipline, to avoid engaging with issues facing South African society at large. This placed the discipline in a position of power, a position of "truth" and "objectivity". All inconvenient forms of knowledge were simply disregarded or silenced through choices, made by powerful institutions and individuals, about what was worthy of being archived. However, when the archive is differently construed, a different picture emerges.  

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/6790

Maaba, Lucius Bavusile (Brown). ‚ÄúThe History and Politics of Liberation Archives at Fort Hare‚ÄĚ. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cape Town, 2013.

This thesis, the first of its kind on liberation historiography, seeks to put the liberation movements archives housed at the University of Fort Hare in context. The thesis focuses mainly on the 1990s, when the repatriation of struggle material by Fort Hare working hand in glove with the liberation movements, mainly the African National Congress ANC), the Pan Africanist Congress(PAC) and the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM), was at its height. 

Link:   https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/11121

Mahashe, George. ‚ÄúDithugula t√Ö¬°a Malefokana: paying libation in the photographic archive made by anthropologists E.J. & J.D. Krige in 1930s Bolobedu, under Queen Modjadji III‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2012.

How, and in what ways, might a visually - and artistically - inclined person gain knowledge from a body of ethnographic photographic objects? I approach this question by launching an inquiry into the Balobedu of Limpopo province, South Africa as masters of myth - making, the 1930s anthropologists as masters of perception and myth transmission, the camera as a mechanical tool that has no master and the photographic image and object as a slippery abstract, or thing, that resists taming. What binds Balobedu, anthropologists and photography in this relationship is their collaboration at particular points in time in the production of the knowledge that is now Khelobedu. Khelobedu refers to all knowledge, custom, practices and culture emanating from Bolobedu and its people. To do this, I assume, or play with, the character of ' motshwara marapo ' (keeper of the bones or master of ceremonies), a versed person who officiates in ceremonies involving multiple custodies, doing so by reciting stories and enacting activities that facilitate progress within ceremonies and rituals. My engagement explores the process of pacifying a disavowed ethnographic archive using the performative aspect of the photographic object's materiality with the aim of gaining knowledge of the indigenous and colonial, using concepts with origins in both categories.

Link:  https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/14569

Butcher, Clare. "The Principles of Packing: A case study of two travelling exhibitions from 1947-9" . MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2012.

The travelling exhibition was formalised in a series of manuals, The Organization of Museums: Practical Advice (Museums and Monuments Series, IX) published by UNESCO as recently as the 1960s. Promoted as a utility for societies seeking to mediate rapid cultural change to one another in the period following the Second World War, my study highlights how certain elements of this display genre could be seen as inherent to all exhibitions: firstly, that carefully selected objects have the power to transport ideological and aesthetic values; secondly, that exhibitions are transient objects, in themselves worthy of study, as constructs of logistical, conceptual, public and political bolts and joints; and thirdly, that exhibition curators often play the role of diplomat ‚Äď negotiating and mediating meaning across borders of various kinds. Though seemingly an obscure example, the large-scale international exchange of the Exhibition of Contemporary British Paintings and Drawings (1947-8) and the Exhibition of Contemporary South African Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture (1948-9) between the colonial centre and so-called ‚Äėperiphery‚Äô of the South African Union, is a complex case study within a certain trajectory of travelling exhibitions. Never dealt with previously, the occurrence of such an exchange is significant not only because of its political context ‚Äď in an immediate post-war, pre-apartheid moment ‚Äď but also because many of the curatorial strategies used in the exchange process are heralded in UNESCO‚Äôs manual of Travelling Exhibitions (1953). To unpack this British-South African colonial freight could be easily regarded as a ‚Äėmerely‚Äô art historical or archival gesture. If however, we understand the archive to be an historically determined framework within which to arrange cultural knowledge (Hamilton 2011), then an archive of travelling exhibitions makes both actual and contingent those cultural arrangements ‚Äď the transient curatorial ‚Äėprinciples of packing‚Äô (UNESCO 1963). This project asserts that whether or not an exhibition is designated as such, travelling, as both an approach and the effect of curatorship, becomes the utility for mobilising not only objects but also ideas between contexts as seemingly disparate as those of the 1940s exhibitions or in today‚Äôs expansive ‚Äėart worlds‚Äô.

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/7804

Greenwood, Megan. ‚ÄúWatchful witnesses : a study of the Crypt Memory and Witness Centre at St George's Cathedral and its Bearing Witness exhibition process‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2011.

This thesis examines four themes that surface through the Crypt Centre's activities towards its upcoming exhibition entitled Bearing Witness. The themes include the role of remembrance, bearing witness, the parameters of inclusions and exclusions, and the Crypt Centre's physical and symbolic significance.

Link: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10507

Winberg, Marlene. ‚ÄúAnnotations of loss and abundance: an examination of the !kun children's material in the Bleek and Lloyd Collection (1879-1881)‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2011.

The Bleek and Lloyd Collection is an archive of interviews and stories, drawings, paintings and photographs of and xam and !kun individuals, collected by Wilhelm Bleek and Lucy Lloyd between 1870 and 1881 in Cape Town. My dissertation focuses on the !kun children's material in the archive, created by Lucy Lloyd and the four !kun boys, !nanni, Tamme uma and Da, who lived in her home in Cape Town between 1879 and 1881. Until very recently, their collection of 17 notebooks and more than 570 paintings and drawings had been largely ignored and remained a silent partner to the larger, xam, part of the collection. Indeed, in a major publication it was declared that nothing was known about the boys and stated that "there is no information on their families of origin, the conditions they had previously lived under, or the reasons why they ended up in custody" (Szalay 2002: 21). This study places the children centre stage and explores their stories from a number of perspectives. I set out to assess to what extent the four !kun children laid down an account of their personal and historical experiences, through their texts, paintings and drawings in the Bleek and Lloyd project to record Bushmen languages and literature. In order to do this, I have investigated the historical and socioeconomic conditions in the territory now known as Namibia during the period of their childhoods, as well as the circumstances under which the children were conveyed to Cape Town and eventually joined the Bleek- Lloyd household. I have looked at Lucy Lloyd's personal history and examined the ways in which she shaped the making of the collection in her home. I suggest that a consideration of the loss and trauma experienced by Lloyd may have predisposed her to recognition and engagement of, or at least, accommodation of, the trauma experienced by the !kun boys.

Link: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/21627

Jappie, Saarah. ‚ÄúFrom madrasah to museum: a biography of the Islamic manuscripts of Cape Town‚ÄĚ. MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2011.

This paper focuses on the Islamic manuscripts of Cape Town, locally referred to as kietaabs, written by Muslims predominantly in the 19th century, in jawi (Arabic-Malay) and Arabic-Afrikaans. Inspired by the idea of a 'biography' of the archive and 'the social life of things', the study traces the life of the kietaabs, from their creation and original use, to their role in contemporary South African society, as objects of heritage and identity. It approaches the kietaabs as objects, emphasizing their movements, status and use, rather than their content.

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Click on the links below for information on the various Master's courses:

CSC5000W    Computer Science Dissertation  CSC5002W    Computer Science Minor Dissertation  CSC5008Z    Data Visualisation CSC5020Z    Research Methods In Computer Science  CSC5021Z    Computational Geometry For 3d Printing  CSC5022Z    Distributed Scientific Computing  CSC5023Z    Evolutionary Computation  CSC5024Z    Information Retrieval  CSC5025Z    Intelligent Systems   CSC5026Z    Introduction To ICT For Development  CSC5027Z    Logics For Artificial Intelligence   CSC5028Z    Ontology Engineering  CSC5029Z    Introduction To Image Processing And Computer Vision  CSC5030Z    Advanced Topics In Computer Science Master's 1  CSC5031Z    Advanced Topics In Computer Science Master's 2  CSC5032Z    Networks & Internet Systems  CSC5033Z    Human Computer Interaction  

Master's specialising in Computer Science by Dissertation

CSC5000W    COMPUTER SCIENCE DISSERTATION  Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course entry requirements: Computer Science Honours from UCT prior to 2018, or permission from the Head of Department in exceptional cases. In the normal case, students will be expected to register for Master’s specialising in Computer Science, by coursework and minor dissertation.

Course outline:   This course consists of an investigation of an approved topic chosen for intensive study by the candidate (student), culminating in the submission of a dissertation. The dissertation shall demonstrate the successful completion of a programme of training in research methods, a thorough understanding of the scientific principles underlying the research and an appropriate acquaintance with the relevant literature. It must be clearly presented and conform to the standards of the department and faculty. The dissertation will usually consist of a report detailing the conduct, and analysis of the results of, research performed under the close guidance of a suitably qualified supervisor/s. The dissertation should be well-conceived and acknowledge earlier research in the field. It should demonstrate the ability to undertake a substantial and informed piece of research, and to collect, organise and analyse material. General rules for this degree may be found in the front of the handbook. Students will be expected to attend a research methods course in the first year. 

Master's specialising in Computer Science by Coursework and Minor dissertation 

Programme Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course structure: See General rules for Master's Degrees in the front section of the Science handbook .

Progression: In any given year, students must either be registered for or have passed at least six of the elective courses. Students get two attempts to pass each course. Should a student fail any course on the second attempt, they will not be allowed to continue with the degree. This applies to the Research Methods course as well. Students should pass a minimum of two elective courses per year. With the course convener’s permission, students who have passed the Research Methods course as well as four of the six elective courses may be permitted to register for CSC5002W. Students are not eligible to register for CSC5002W until they have completed the Research Methods course and at least four (out of six) elective courses. 

CSC5002W    COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR DISSERTATION  90 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor T A Meyer 

Course entry requirements: Completion of all coursework, or permission of the convener. Course outline:   Upon successful completion of the coursework component (CSC5001W), students will be required to register for this minor dissertation component and complete a suitable research project under supervision of an appropriate computer science academic staff member. The research component will expose the student to research methodology, experimental design, data analysis techniques, and dissertation writing skills. Students should be in a position to submit the final dissertation by the end of the year.  Assessment: The minor dissertation must be presented for formal examination. The coursework and minor dissertation each count 50% towards the degree; each must be passed separately for the award of the degree. 

CSC5008Z    DATA VISUALISATION  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Associate Professor M M Kuttel 

Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. 

Course outline:   Visualisation is the graphical representation of data with the goal of improving comprehension, communication, hypothesis generation and decision making. This course aims to teach the principles of effective visualisation of large, multidimensional data sets. We cover the field of visual thinking, outlining current understanding of human perception and demonstrating how we can use this knowledge to create more effective data visualisations.   DP requirements: 40% for assignment component.  Assessment: Students will be assessed with an assignments (50%) and an exam (50%). A sub-minimum of 40% will be required for each of the assignment and exam components of the course. 

CSC5020Z    RESEARCH METHODS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE  18 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener.  Course outline:   The objective of the Research Methods course is to introduce students to a suite of research methods from the perspective of Computer Science, that will prepare them for the minor dissertation component of the degree. More specifically, the aim is to ensure that students are able to write an appropriate research proposal, and have a good understanding of what it means to conduct research within Computer Science.  Course content includes: An introduction to finding and reading research papers; Literature reviews; Writing research proposals; Problem statements, research questions, and hypotheses; Types of research within Computer Science; Research Ethics within Computer Science; Scientific and technical writing; Qualitative and quantitative research methods; Research statistics; Research planning and grant writing; Academic career planning.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: A submitted literature review (50%) and research proposal (50%).  

CSC5021Z    COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY FOR 3D PRINTING  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor J Gain  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Computer Graphics at third-year level.  Course outline:   The objective is to master surface and volumetric modelling concepts applicable to 3D printing. The use of 3D printers for rapid prototyping is becoming increasingly prevalent. However, the process used by most current 3D printers of depositing thin layers of semi-molten material, which is known as Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), is not without limitations. Factors such as material thickness and support structures need to be considered. This course will cover the theoretical concepts required for creating geometric models suitable for 3D printing. From a practical perspective, students will code modelling software, then design and ultimately print a 3D model. Topics covered include: Geometry and Topology for Computer Graphics; 3D Printing Concepts: Printing Hardware, Overhang Support, Applications; Volumetric Concepts: Voxels, Computational Solid Geometry, Isosurface Extraction; Surface Concepts: Parametric Surfaces, Mesh Smoothing, Free-Form Deformation.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: open book, 2 hours, 40%. Practical assessments 50%; Final printed show piece, 10%  

CSC5022Z ¬† ¬†DISTRIBUTED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING¬† This course will not be offered every year.¬† 12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9¬† Convener: Professor R Simmonds¬† Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. A basic understanding of computer networking and software systems.¬† Course outline: ¬† The objective is to provide an understanding of the basic components used to build Grid and Cloud computing systems, with a focus on how these can support Scientific Computing.¬† This course gives an overview of the components that make up Grid and Cloud computing environments. These include the components used to build distributed data and computing grids and the various ‚Äúas a Service‚ÄĚ systems referred to as Cloud computing. It also looks t how these are used for a range of activities, including supporting large scale Scientific Computing.¬† DP requirements: None¬† Assessment: Final examination: 60%; Practical assignments: 40% ¬†

CSC5023Z    EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Dr G Nitschke  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. A basic understanding of genetics and evolution is useful, but not required.  Course outline:   Evolutionary computation entails the use of simulated biological evolution to solve problems that are difficult to solve using traditional computer science and engineering methods. This course examines different Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs) and the types of problems EAs are best suited to solve. Course objectives include: gaining an understanding of various evolutionary computation techniques, identifying EAs suitable for solving different types of problems, and how to apply EAs to optimisation, machine learning, or design tasks.  The topics covered include: Introduction to Evolutionary Computation; What is an Evolutionary Algorithm; Genetic Algorithms; Evolution Strategies; Evolutionary Programming; Genetic Programming; Niching; Multi-Objective Optimisation; Co-evolution; and Working with EAs.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: closed book, 2 hours, 60%; Practical assignment: 40%.  

CSC5024Z    INFORMATION RETRIEVAL  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor H Suleman  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Basic understanding of XML data is required. Some background on statistics and linear algebra will be useful.  Course outline:   The objective is to understand how search engines work at an algorithmic level. Learn how to build and incorporate basic and specialised search engines into your own projects.  Course content includes: Introduction to Information Retrieval (IR); Models of Basic IR (Boolean, Vector, Probabilistic); IR evaluation and testbeds; Stemming, Stopping, Relevance Feedback; Models of Web and linked-data retrieval (Pagerank, HITS); Latent Semantic Analysis and Clustering; Multimedia IR; Cross-lingual and multilingual IR; and IR in Practice (CMSes, digital libraries, Web, social media, etc.).  Selected topics will be included from: Distributed and Federated IR; Recommender Systems; Natural Language Processing for IR; Sentiment Analysis; Opinion Retrieval; and Text Summarization.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam (take-home): 40%; Assignments: 40%; Class participation: 20%  

CSC5025Z    INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Associate Professor D Moodley  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. A strong mathematics background.  Course outline:   This Computer Science masters course provides an introduction to designing and implementing intelligent systems, using selected Artificial Intelligence techniques. The course will introduce you to at least two widely used Artificial Intelligence approaches, including machine learning and Bayesian Artificial Intelligence. You will learn these techniques from a Computer Science perspective, specifically how to design real world intelligent systems that incorporate such AI techniques.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: 2 hour open book exam: 50%, Practical assignments: 50%  

CSC5026Z    INTRODUCTION TO ICT FOR DEVELOPMENT  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Dr M Densmore  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener.  Course outline:   The goal is for you to understand basic ideas underlying ICT4D and how they are used in practice. You will learn about and critically evaluate ICT4D projects. You will learn how to design and evaluate development-oriented computing projects.  Course Content: Introduction to key terminology around socio-economic development; Key concepts in ICT4D (e.g. social inclusion, after access); Case studies in specific domains, including healthcare, agriculture, mobile money, education, etc.; Critical evaluation of ICT4D projects.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Practical assignments: 80%; Case Study Presentation: 10%; Class Participation: 10%  

CSC5027Z    LOGICS FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Familiarity with basic discrete mathematics is highly recommended.  Course outline:   This course will introduce students to logics used in the area of Knowledge Representation - a subarea of Artificial Intelligence.  Logic plays a central role in many areas of Artificial Intelligence. This course will introduce students to Description Logics, a family of logics frequently used in the area of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning. Description Logics are frequently used to represent formal ontologies.   Topics covered include the following: The Description Logic ALC; Reasoning in Description Logics with Tableaux Algorithms; Reasoning in the EL family of Description Logics; and Query Answering.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: open book, 3 hours, 50%; Assignments: 50%.  

CSC5028Z ¬† ¬†ONTOLOGY ENGINEERING¬† This course will not be offered every year.¬† 12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9¬† Convener: Associate Professor M Keet¬† Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Experience in modelling (ER, UML Class diagrams) and some familiarity with logic will be helpful.¬† Course outline: ¬† The principal aim of this module is to provide the participant with an overview of ontology engineering‚ÄĒincluding language features, automated reasoning, and top-down and bottom-up ontology development‚ÄĒand a main application field being the Semantic Web.¬† Course Content: Ontologies are used in a wide range of applications, such as data integration, recommender systems, e-learning, semantic scientific workflows, and natural language processing. While some of these applications pass the revue, the main focus of the course is on the ontologies. The topics covered include the following:¬† Logic foundations for ontologies: Languages (Description Logics, OWL); and Automated reasoning (class and instance classification, satisfiability and ontology consistency checking).¬† Ontology development: Ontology engineering, top-down - foundational ontologies, ontology design patterns; Ontology engineering, bottom-up - exploiting legacy material, such as relational databases, thesauri, text; and Methodologies for ontology development and maintenance, methods to enhance ontology quality and to automate some aspect of the methodology.¬† DP requirements: None¬† Assessment: Exam (closed-book but with some material provided): 50%; assignments: 50%. ¬†

CSC5029Z    INTRODUCTION TO IMAGE PROCESSING AND COMPUTER VISION  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Associate Professor P Marais  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Experience in modelling (ER, UML Class diagrams) and some familiarity with logic will be helpful.  Course outline:   To introduce students to basic concepts in computer vision and image processing, oriented towards solving real world, practical image analysis problems. The student will be introduced to basic concepts from digital signal processing, and a foundation built that will allow understanding of how more sophisticated schemes such as image analysis/segmentation which can be used to describe image and volumetric data at a higher, more useful, levels of abstraction. Case studies and papers will be examined which relate this to real-world problems.  A number of lectures (as indicated below) will be presented by the course convener, interspersed with paper/review sessions in which topical papers are discussed and followed up by review questions.  Topic will include: Basic Signal processing; Image Transforms & Operations; Feature Detection; Object Descriptions; Basic Segmentation & Registration; Fundamental Segmentation techniques; Machine Learning & GAs in Cvision; Case Study; and Paper Reviews.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: Open Book; 2 hours. Class Record: Practical 60%, Review Questions 40%. Final Mark: Exam 40%, Class Record 60%.  

CSC5030Z    ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE MASTER'S 1  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener.  Course outline:   This course introduces advanced and cutting edge topics in Computer Science as they emerge with new areas of investigation or practice.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: 50% and Coursework: 50%  

CSC5031Z    ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE MASTER'S 2  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Professor T A Meyer  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener.  Course outline:   To introduce advanced and cutting edge topics in Computer Science as they emerge as new areas of investigation or practice.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Exam: 50% and Coursework: 50%  

CSC5032Z    NETWORKS & INTERNET SYSTEMS  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Dr J Chavula  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener. Working knowledge of computer networks.  Course outline:   The objective is to gain advanced understanding of techniques for traffic engineering and quality of service in the Internet architecture. The course focuses on advanced topics in internetworking, traffic engineering, and mechanisms for measuring performance and Quality of Service (QoS) for network services and the Internet.  Course content includes: New Network and Transport Protocols (IPv6, Mobile IP, IP Multicast, Multipath TCP, QUIC); Routing and Traffic Engineering (Interdomain Routing and Traffic Enginering with Border Gateway Protocol); Traffic Engineering with Overlay Networking (MPLS/GMPL, Location/Identifier Separation Protocols, Software Defined Networking and Network Function Virtualization); Internet Measurements (Quality of Service and Quality of Experience (QoS and QoE), IP Traffic Monitoring and Analysis)  Selected reading/discussion topics will be included from: Cloud Infrastructure; Content Delivery Networks; Internet Access in the Developing World, Community Networks; ICT4D, Online Data Protection and Online Censorship.  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Assignments: 40%; Discussion sessions: 15%; Active Participation in Class: 5%; Final Exam : 40%  

CSC5033Z    HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION  This course will not be offered every year.  12 NQF credits at HEQSF level 9  Convener: Dr M Densmore  Course entry requirements: Admission into the Master's degree specialising in Computer Science, or permission from the course convener.  Course outline:   This course will introduce you to basic concepts and practice around user-centred design of digital systems.  This course covers how to design and evaluate interactive systems for real users both in the developed and developing worlds. We will look at both theory and practice of designing digital systems.  Topics include the design cycle, sketching and storyboarding, task analysis, contextual inquiry, conceptual models, usability inspection, human information processing, experience design, and qualitative and quantitative study design and evaluation. We will also invite guest speakers from industry and research to talk about their own experiences with user-centred design.  The course will contain additional practical work to distinguish it from the honours level module on Human Computer Interaction (CSC4024Z).  DP requirements: None  Assessment: Participation: 10% (measured by participation in user studies, in-class activities, in-class discussion/presentations, and pre-class quizzes on Vula) Individual Practical Assessments: 20%. Group Project Assessments: 40% Final Exam: 30%    

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  • Dissertation

Professonial with two master degrees offering assistance with writing and editing dissertations.

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At Fritz's home: Cape Town

About Fritz

I have master degrees in Business Administration (MBA from SU) and in Human Resources and Labour Relations (MA from UPE). I have lectured at post-graduate level and assisted students in dissertation writing. I have more than 20 years of work experience.

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I do not impose my writing style on the student, but ensure that the principles of academic writing are adhered to while retaining the authentic voice of the student.

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Fritz helped me with my MBA thesis which was on a topic he knew very little about as it was highly technical in the applyication of statistical physics methods to financial data. Not only did I complete my thesis in record time (8 weeks) but I also got it passed without major revision, ending up with a really good mark. This was only possible because Fritz helped me organise my research and present it in an academic, meaningful way. I highly recommend Fritz to anyone who needs guidance in academic writing.

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Introductionary lesson of 30 minutes for free. Thereafter one hour lessons will be charged at R300 / hour or part thereof.

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COMMENTS

  1. Dissertations & Theses

    Dissertations & Theses. The Faculty of Law offers dissertation-only Masters and PhD programmes. While much of the information applies to both levels, each degree type has specific requirements, regulations and guidelines. All of this information is provided at the menu links. A full guide for Masters and Doctoral theses is available here and ...

  2. Master's Dissertation Information

    1. Intention to Submit. A research student submits a 60, 120 or 180 credit dissertation for examination. Students must inform the Faculty Office of their intention to submit for examination prior to actual submission for examination, by uploading the following to PeopleSoft: EBE01 - Intention to submit form. EBE02 - IP assessment form.

  3. Theses & Dissertations

    UCT Masters and Doctoral theses. The Libraries hold all UCT masters and doctoral theses. Honours theses are kept by the academic departments to which they were submitted. Access UCT theses on the UCT institutional repository, Open UCT.

  4. Preparing to submit

    Preparing to submit. Preparing to submit. For the Masters dissertation: Candidates are required to give a written notice of intention to submit 6 weeks in advance of submitting their dissertation. Once you submit your notice of intention to submit, the Humanities Postgraduate Office starts the process of appointing external examiners, so that ...

  5. Master's Dissertation Information

    STEP 2 - Create the upload thesis/dissertation service request via PeopleSoft. Plagiarism Declaration; Declaration and Rebate Form; ... A student graduates at a congregation of the University of Cape Town. That is, a graduation ceremony where the degree or diploma is conferred upon him/her. The graduation date appears on the certificate and ...

  6. Getting started

    The research proposal is a plan of action; it sets out the aims of your research project and how you intend to achieve these aims. A good research proposal provides a focus for your research activity and a benchmark against which you can make whatever adjustments become necessary.

  7. Theses and Dissertations

    In cases where you need to consult a thesis that has been completed at another university in South Africa, you can request it through Inter-Library Loans. There are a number of Electronic Theses and Dissertations databases that index theses and provide access to web-based full-text collections in South Africa and worldwide.

  8. Mini-Dissertations

    Mini-Dissertations. Research is core to the Faculty's Masters-level and PhD programmes. LLM and MPhil programmes with coursework and dissertation require a submisision of not more than 25,000 words. Although an original contribution to knowledge is always desirable in a minor dissertation/research paper, it is not an essential requirement.

  9. Graduated Theses / Dissertations

    University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by O. Crespo and J. Louw. Lee,J . 2021. On Non-epistemic Values in Climate Science for Decision support. University of Cape Town. PhD supervised by B.Hewitson, R. Jack and W.Parker. Parbhoo, T. 2021. The Skill Assessment of Seasonal Wind Prediction in South Africa. University of Cape Town.

  10. Theses / Dissertations

    Contact us. Jill Claassen. Manager: Scholarly Communication & Publishing. Email: [email protected] +27 (0)21 650 1263

  11. Theses

    MA Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2020. This thesis examines the public roles and responsibilities of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg in the period 1922-1994. It does this through a close investigation of four moments in the history of the University, namely the foundation of Wits (1910s and 1920s); early debates about ...

  12. Libraries

    Open database. Doctoral dissertations and master's theses are a vital fund of scholarship for any discipline. The massive body of work available through ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) represents the most comprehensive source of academic research in the world.

  13. Writing Centre

    The Writing Centre emerged in February 1994 as a result of concerns about the quality of student writing at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Often poor writing is a result of poor understanding of the task, the concepts involved, or the form the writing should take. Writing thus plays a central role in constructing understanding, and is a ...

  14. Master's specialising in Computer Science

    Master's specialising in Computer Science by Dissertation. CSC5000W COMPUTER SCIENCE DISSERTATION Convener: Professor T A Meyer Course entry requirements: Computer Science Honours from UCT prior to 2018, or permission from the Head of Department in exceptional cases. In the normal case, students will be expected to register for Master's specialising in Computer Science, by coursework and ...

  15. Dissertation Writing Services in Cape Town: Your Key to Academic

    The dissertation process can be intimidating and overpowering for a doctorate applicant. There may be challenges along the way, from choosing a research topic to presenting your findings, that will…

  16. 17 dissertation tutors in Cape Town

    Private dissertation and thesis writing tutorials in Cape Town. Face-to-face or online. Find a dissertation tutor to help you succeed. Dissertation coaches in Cape Town ūüíĽ An online or in-person dissertation tutor ūüďė Lessons tailored to your needs ūüĎ©ūüŹĹ‚Äćūüéď Private tutoring from R100/h ūüĒí Verified reviews.

  17. Fritz

    At Fritz's home: Cape Town. ... (MA from UPE). I have lectured at post-graduate level and assisted students in dissertation writing. I have more than 20 years of work experience. See more. About the lesson. All levels; ... Superprof Private lessons in Cape Town Private dissertation lessons in Cape Town. See all tutors. Share. Fritz.

  18. How to Choose the Right Topic for Your PhD Thesis Writing in Cape Town

    The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is a highly regarded academic degree that demands substantial writing and study to prove a candidate's mastery of the subject matter. Writing a doctoral thesis ...