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Winners of Chancellor's English Essay Prize 2022 Announced

light

We are delighted to announce that Francesca Gardner and George Adams have been named the joint winners of the Chancellor's English Essay Prize 2022. This year's subject was 'Light' and the two winning entries,  Making Light of Essays   (Francesca Gardner) and  Hail Holy Light, "Offspring of Heaven first-born"   (George Adams), are now available to read online.  

The Chancellor’s English Essay Prize is open to members of the University within four years of matriculation on the closing date for the receipt of submissions. Entries should not exceed 12,500 words in length.

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Cambridge University Press and  Language Teaching  announce the winner and runner-up as follows:

Winner Dr. Meng Liu, Beijing Foreign Studies University, China Whose open science are we talking about? From open science in psychology to open science in applied linguistics .

Runner up  Dr. James Wagstaffe , University of Reading, UK The Adult L2 Self: Self-discrepancy, Self-value, and the Willingness to communicate.

Submissions

The editors —, the avery review essay prize 2022.

Submissions due January 31, 2022

The Avery Review , a journal of critical essays on architecture published by the Office of Publications at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, invites submissions for its fifth annual Essay Prize. The call is open to current students (undergraduate and masters) and recent graduates, whether in schools of architecture or elsewhere (eligibility details below). In keeping with the mission of the journal, we hope to receive submissions that use the genres of the review and the critical essay to explore the urgent questions animating the field of architecture. We’re looking for essays that test and expand the author’s own intellectual commitments—theoretical, architectural, and political—through the work of others.

We plan to award one first-place prize ($4,000) and three second-place prizes ($2,000) across the various categories of eligible participants. The winning essays will be published in our June 2022 issue.

We encourage you to (re)visit and (re)read the prize winning essays of years past!

In 2021, Batoul Faour took stock of the shattered glass in Beirut in the aftermath of the August 4th port explosion to uncover political violence waged through this fragile material ; Jacob Cascio carefully uncovered the story of the National AIDS Memorial Grove’s ever-changing landscape ; Tamara Zeina Jamil looked beyond Rikers Island to reveal the machinations of the carceral industrial complex ; and Brandon Adriano Ortiz coiled together a personal, spatial, and temporal account of Taos and the Taos Pueblo that casts body, building, and micaceous clay into ongoing relation .

In 2020, Athena Do  parsed the design guidelines of the Development Handbook for the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center ; Sameeah Ahmed-Arai  refracted the Sipopo Congress Center in New Guinea, and the development discourse that structures it, through an anti-“anti-politics” lens ; James Andrew Billingsley  composed an alternative portrait of Greenland that is layered, complex, diverse, and rogue ; and Romy Kießling  considered whether private property rights might be a way of addressing climate change accountability .

In 2019, Oskar Johanson  journeyed to Gorda Cay to expose the counterfeit histories of Walt Disney imagineering ; Marcell Hajdu  rendered the demand for spectacular imagery by Hungary’s current “illiberal” regime ; Alex Tell  touched down on various moments that elucidate the problems and possibilities of “air rights” ; and Zoë Toledo  eroded the disguise of the Indian New Deal on Navajo territory in the 1930s .

In 2018, Tizziana Baldenebro  confronted the undervaluation of critical black female art and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s inclusionary curatorial practices ; Elsa MH Mäki investigated the violent intersection of resource extraction, land ownership, and tribal sovereignty in the “man camp” ; Kahira Ngige  speculated on the megachurch and the urban implications of ecclesiastical architecture in Nairobi ; and Sajdeep Soomal  situated family history within the colonial orders of Ontario and the Punjab .

Submissions for the Avery Review Essay Prize should take the form of critical essays on books, buildings, and other architectural media, broadly defined. We’re delighted to receive work that was developed in the context of classes and seminars as well as independent writing. Our essays are typically 3,000–4,500 words in length and have some object of review at their core. We like stylish, concise, accessible, and earnestly felt writing. Texts should be submitted as double-spaced Word files without images; you may provide six to eight images compiled into a separate PDF (keep attachments to 3mb max please). Submissions should be emailed to [email protected].

Eligibility

Current undergraduates, current masters level students, and recent graduates (graduation date after 12/1/2020) from any undergraduate or master’s program at any university are eligible. Please include your student status and graduation date (actual or anticipated) in your submission email. We encourage submissions from any field of study that takes architecture as a subject.

If you will be a student in the 2022–2023 academic year, please be aware that in accordance with university and federal policy, prizes and awards are taxable and are reported for inclusion in student financial aid packages, and may reduce other financial aid the student may receive.

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The topic for this year’s Royal Institute of Philosophy essay prize competition is ‘Emotions’.

Each year the Royal Institute of Philosophy holds an essay prize competition.  The winner will receive £2,500 and their essay will be published in  Philosophy

Previous winners include Jonas Faria Costa’s ‘On Gregariousness’ (winner of the 2021 prize), Lucy McDonald’s ‘Please Like This Paper’ and Nikhil Venkatesh’s ‘Surveillance Capitalism: a Marx-inspired Account’ (winners of the 2020 prize), Georgi Gardiner’s ‘Profiling and Proof: Are Statistics Safe?’ (2019 prize winner) and Rebecca Buxton’s ‘Reparative Justice for Climate Refugees’ (2018 prize winner).

The topic for this year’s prize is ‘ Emotions ’. We intend this topic to be understood very broadly, so as to include related issues in any area of philosophy and from any philosophical tradition.

The winner will receive £2,500 and their essay will be published in  Philosophy . The submission deadline is 20 December 2022, 23:59 GMT. Entries will be considered by a panel of judges and the winner announced in Spring 2023.

In assessing entries priority will be given to originality, clarity of expression, breadth of interest, and potential for advancing discussion. All entries will be deemed to be submissions to  Philosophy .

In exceptional circumstances, the prize may be awarded jointly, in which case the financial component will be divided. The winning entry/entries will be published in the July 2023 issue of  Philosophy . Please submit entries by email to [email protected], with the subject line ‘Prize Essay’. The word-limit for the Essay Competition is 8,000 words.

Instructions for contributors can be found here: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/philosophy/annual-essay-prize

Entries should be anonymised and suitable for blind review. (Please note that Essay Prize submissions should be sent to the email address above and should not submitted through the ScholarOne).

The essay prize competition is now closed. 

Congratulations to the 2022 Senior Essay Prize Nominees and Winners!

Senior Essays 2022

Each year, 30-50 students write a senior essay in economics. This year, these essays spanned topics across all fields of economics, including unemployment benefits, auction design, international climate agreements, child labor, and college admission policies. The top essays are nominated for prizes by the student’s advisor and a second reader from the department. A committee of Economics faculty members read and select the winning essays, and the prizes are awarded on commencement day during the students’ respective college ceremonies.

The prizes are as follows:

  • The Charles Heber Dickerman Memorial Prize: the best departmental essay(s).
  • The Ronald Meltzer/Cornelia Awdziewicz Economic Award: runner-up(s) for the Dickerman Prize.
  • The Ellington Prize: the best departmental essay in the field of finance.

This year, nine senior essays were nominated: Michael Barresi, Kueho Choi, Jack Hirsch, Kamila Janmohamed, Jack Kelly, Aiden Lee, Salma Shaheen, Siddarth Shankar, and Brian Zhu.

The Dickerman Prize for the Best Senior Essay goes this year to two recipients: Kamila Janmohamed (“Estimating Policy Effects with Staggered Implementation and Multiple Periods: Another Look at Family Caps”) and Jack Hirsch (“Optimal Auction Mechanisms in the Presence of Regret”).  The Meltzer/Awdziewicz Prize goes to Michael Barresi (“Unilateral Carbon Policies and Multilateral Coalitions: An Analysis of Coalition Stability under the Optimal Unilateral Policy”). The Ellington Prize for the best essay in finance goes to Brian Zhu (“Regime-Switching Factor Models with Applications Portfolio Selection and Demand Estimation”).

Yale College also awarded the Wrexham Prize for the best senior essay in the Social Sciences to Kamila Janmohamed for her above-mentioned essay.

The essays for all the nominees and winners are posted below:

Michael Barresi: “ Unilateral Carbon Policies and Multilateral Coalitions: An Analysis of Coalition Stability under the Optimal Unilateral Policy ” (Advisor: Samuel Kortum)

This essay derives a theoretically optimal unilateral carbon tax for a multi-country world and quantifies the performance of that tax in light of the free-rider problem by calibrating the theoretical solution to real world data.

Kueho Choi: “ Unemployment Insurance and Job Quality: Evidence from the COVID-19 Pandemic ”  (Advisor: Giuseppe Moscarini)

This essay explores the effect of unemployment insurance (UI) on the quality (rather than quantity) of employment, focusing on the broad-based policies enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Using micro data from the Current Population Survey and a new dataset with more precise estimates of UI receipt, the paper finds that the pandemic-era UI supplements had no significant effect on reemployment job quality.

Jack Hirsch: “ Optimal Auction Mechanisms in the Presence of Regret ”  (Advisor: Dirk Bergemann)

This paper considers an auction model that incorporates a penalty for regret into bidder utility functions to study how bidders change their bidding strategy, and how those changes affect the seller’s revenue. The essay classifies the full family of mechanisms that maximize seller revenue and characterize the effects of regret on optimal bidding behavior and seller revenue of several commonly employed auctions. 

Kamila Janmohamed:  “ Estimating Policy Effects With Staggered Implementation and Multiple Periods: Another Look at Family Caps ” (Advisor: Cormac O’Dea)

This paper applies recent advances in the differences-in-differences literature to evaluate the effects of family caps: a set of policies that freeze US welfare recipients’ benefits at a level based on the size of their family when they began receiving welfare. By exploiting variation in the timing and stringency of their implementation, Kamila finds that family caps have failed to achieve their stated aims and may be counterproductive. 

Jack Kelly: “ Who Benefits From Multiple Choice(s)?: The Equilibrium Impacts of Test-Optional College Admissions ”  (Advisor: Jason Abaluck)

This paper examines increasingly prevalent “test-optional” college admissions policies, whereby students need not send their SAT or ACT scores to gain admission. Jack developed a method to estimate the causal impact of switching to test-optionality on the composition of admitted students, and applies this method to a proprietary data set from a test-optional college.

Aiden Lee: “ The Motherhood Penalty: Assessing the Labor Market Effects of Childcare Closures During the COVID-19 ” (Advisor: Fabrizio Zilibotti)

This project measured the effect of childcare center closures on individuals’ labor market decisions, for instance, their likelihood to reduce hours or leave the labor force altogether. It also examined how government aid affected a childcare center’s likelihood of permanent closure during the pandemic.

Salma Shaheen: “ The Impact of Violent Political Conflict on Child Labor: Evidence from the Palestinian Territories ” (Advisor: Ceren Baysan)

This paper uses locality-level panel data from the Palestinian Labor Force Survey (PLFS) to study the effect of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict on child labor among ten to fourteen-year-old individuals in the West Bank between 1999 and 2016. The analysis combines data on conflict-related violence (e.g. fatalities and prisoners) and conflict-infrastructure (e.g. checkpoints and the separation wall) to construct various accurate measures of an individual’s exposure to conflict intensity. Exploiting the temporal and geographical variation in these measures, Salma shows that multiple aspects of conflict affect child labor in different directions and with different magnitudes.

Siddarth Shankar: “ Cities in the Information Age Are Information-Intensive Firms Contributing to Urban Inequality? ” (Advisor: Sun Kyoung Lee)

This paper analyzes the effect of information-intensive job growth on wages, amenities, and housing costs for high- and low- skilled workers in metropolitan statistical areas across the United States.

Brian Zhu: “ Regime-switching factor models with applications to portfolio selection and demand estimation ” (Advisor: Xiaohong Chen)

Regime-switching factor models (RSFMs) are useful in capturing the cyclical nature of returns in certain asset classes. In this essay, Brian presents closed-form update rules for expectation-maximization algorithms used to estimate RSFMs, and shows how their regime-switching framework has applications in portfolio selection and demand estimation. 

In addition to essays, The Department of Economics awarded two additional prizes to graduating seniors majoring in economics: the Laun Prize for an outstanding course record in all courses taken at Yale College goes to Daniel Yen and the Massee Prize for an outstanding record in economics courses goes to Jack Kelly .

Congratulations to all of these seniors for their exceptional accomplishments!

Dukes Education

Dukes Essay Prize 2022 - Winners Announced

The Dukes Education Essay Prize is a competition inspired by the former entrance exam to All Souls College, Oxford. Students are given a selection of one-word prompts, from which they choose one and write an essay with their chosen title. They are free to discuss the title from any subject perspective, which encourages creativity, lateral thinking, and the opportunity to explore a topic beyond the curriculum.

This year, the competition received hundreds of submissions from schools across the nation. A panel of experts, including Oxbridge tutors, the heads of the Dukes Education Consultancy, and a member of our Education Advisory Board, read through every submission in an anonymous marking process. It was no easy task to pick the winning essays out of plenty of engaging and creative entries, but after three rounds of marking, we were very pleased to announce the following winners:

1st Place: James from Haberdashers’ Boys’ School, who wrote on ‘Perspective’

2nd Place: Pranav from Queen Elizabeth’s School , who examined the concept of ‘Transformational’

3rd Place: Abimbola from Haberdashers’ Boys’ School , who explored ‘Citizen’ discussing the right to have rights.

The shortlisted entries can be read be clicking below:

  • Liya Kenton – Nuance
  • Janice Chan – Perspective
  • Kyra Yeo – Transformational
  • Madeleine Hicks – Perspective
  • Elizabeth Holden – Reliability
  • Daria Karmazin – Cell
  • Davit Chankseliani – Transformational
  • Ari Joseph – Perspective
  • Ellen Ehrlich – Antiquity
  • Vignesh Rajiv – Cell
  • Declan Griffin – Perspective

Well done to all winners, shortlisted essays, and every participant for taking up this challenging invitation. We are looking forward to next year’s competition!

2022 General Prize Essay Contest

Funded by andrew and barbara taylor.

THE CHALLENGE

We are living in an era of intense global competition. Renewed great power competition will require the Sea Services to rethink how to address national, strategic, and operational challenges and the way they will have to fight.

Authors may address any topic. Some possible issues to consider include:

  • How can the Sea Services quickly and more affordably develop, procure, and field capabilities needed for great power competition?
  • What new or nascent technology do the Sea Services need, and how it would impact tactics or strategy?
  • How can the United States and its allies deter China from coercive action in East Asia or the western Pacific?
  • What should the U.S. nuclear posture and strategy be to deter competitors along the continuum of conflict?
  • What reforms in education and training will or should advance the services?

Submission Guidelines

  • Open to all contributors -- active-duty military, reservists, veterans, and civilians.
  • Essays must be no more than 3,000 words , excluding footnotes, endnotes and sources. Include word count on title page of the essay.
  • Essays are judged in the blind. Do not include author name(s) on title page or within essay.
  • Submit essay as a Word document at www.usni.org/genessay no later than 31 October 2022.
  • Essays must be original and not published (online or print) or being considered for publication elsewhere.

First Prize: $6,000

Second Prize: $3,000

Third Prize: $2,000

Selection Process

The  Proceedings  staff members will evaluate every essay and screen the top essays to the Naval Institute’s Editorial Board composed of serving Sea Service professionals. 

Announcement of the Winners

The winning essays will be published in Proceedings and on the Naval Institute website. The winners will be recognized at a future Naval Institute event.

Selected Submissions

Previous winners, 2023 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2021 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2020 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2019 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2018 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2017 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor, 2016 general prize essay contest funded by andrew and barbara taylor & the crawford taylor foundation, 2015 general prize essay contest, 2014 general prize essay contest, 2013 general prize essay contest, 2012 general prize essay contest, 2011 general prize essay contest, 2010 general prize essay contest, 2009 general prize essay contest, 2008 general prize essay contest, 2007 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest sponsored by northrup grumman, 2006 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest sponsored by northrup grumman, 2005 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 2004 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 2003 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 2002 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 2001 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 2000 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1999 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1998 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1997 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1996 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1995 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1994 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1993 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1992 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1991 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1990 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1989 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1988 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1987 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1986 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1985 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1984 general prize (arleigh burke) essay contest, 1983 general prize essay contest, 1982 general prize essay contest, 1981 general prize essay contest, 1980 general prize essay contest, 1979 general prize essay contest, 1978 general prize essay contest, 1977 general prize essay contest, 1976 general prize essay contest, 1975 general prize essay contest, 1974 general prize essay contest, 1973 general prize essay contest, 1972 general prize essay contest, 1971 general prize essay contest, 1970 general prize essay contest, 1969 general prize essay contest, 1968 general prize essay conteseet, 1967 general prize essay contest, 1966 general prize essay contest, 1965 general prize essay contest, 1964 general prize essay contest, 1963 general prize essay contest, 1962 general prize essay contest, 1961 general prize essay contest, 1960 general prize essay contest, 1959 general prize essay contest, 1958 general prize essay contest, 1957 general prize essay contest, 1956 general prize essay contest, 1955 general prize essay contest, 1954 general prize essay contest, 1953 general prize essay contest, 1952 general prize essay contest, 1951 general prize essay contest, 1950 general prize essay contest, 1949 general prize essay contest, 1948 general prize essay contest, 1947 general prize essay contest, 1946 general prize essay contest, 1945 general prize essay contest, 1944 general prize essay contest, 1943 general prize essay contest, 1941 general prize essay contest, 1940 general prize essay contest, 1939 general prize essay contest, 1938 general prize essay contest, 1937 general prize essay contest, 1936 general prize essay contest, 1935 general prize essay contest, 1934 general prize essay contest, 1933 general prize essay contest, 1932 general prize essay contest, 1931 general prize essay contest, 1930 general prize essay contest, 1929 general prize essay contest, 1928 general prize essay contest, 1927 general prize essay contest, 1926 general prize essay contest, 1925 general prize essay contest, 1923 general prize essay contest, 1921 general prize essay contest, 1920 general prize essay contest, 1919 general prize essay contest, 1918 general prize essay contest, 1917 general prize essay contest, 1916 general prize essay contest, 1915 general prize essay contest, 1914 general prize essay contest, 1913 general prize essay contest, receive the newsletter.

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CFP: Royal Institute of Philosophy 2022 Essay Prize

Submission deadline: December 20, 2022

Topic areas

Each year the Royal Institute of Philosophy holds an essay prize competition. Previous winners include Jonas Faria Costa's 'On Gregariousness' (winner of the 2021 prize), Lucy McDonald's 'Please Like This Paper' and Nikhil Venkatesh's 'Surveillance Capitalism: a Marx-inspired Account' (winners of the 2020 prize), Georgi Gardiner's 'Profiling and Proof: Are Statistics Safe?' (winner of the 2019 prize) and Rebecca Buxton's 'Reparative Justice for Climate Refugees' (winner of the 2018 prize).

The topic for this year’s prize is ‘Emotions’. We intend this topic to be understood very broadly, so as to include related issues in any area of philosophy and from any philosophical tradition.

The winner will receive £2,500 and their essay will be published in  Philosophy . The submission deadline is 20 December 2022, 23:59 GMT. Entries will be considered by a panel of judges and the winner announced in Spring 2023.

In assessing entries priority will be given to originality, clarity of expression, breadth of interest, and potential for advancing discussion. All entries will be deemed to be submissions to  Philosophy .

In exceptional circumstances, the prize may be awarded jointly, in which case the financial component will be divided. The winning entry/entries will be published in the July 2023 issue of  Philosophy . Please submit entries by email to [email protected] , with the subject line 'Prize Essay'. The word-limit for the Essay Competition is 8,000 words. Instructions for contributors can be found here: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/philosophy/information/instructions-contributors.

Entries should be anonymised and suitable for blind review. (Please note that Essay Prize submissions should be sent to the email address above and should not submitted through the ScholarOne).

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essay prize 2022

Essay  COMPETITION

2024 global essay prize, registrations for the 2024 global essay prize are now closed. we are pleased to report that this year we have accepted registrations from  34,823 contestants. if you registered on or before the registration deadline (31 may) we look forward to receiving your essay (submit  here)   by the submission deadline of  sunday, 30 june ..

The John Locke Institute encourages young people to cultivate the characteristics that turn good students into great writers: independent thought, depth of knowledge, clear reasoning, critical analysis and persuasive style. Our Essay Competition invites students to explore a wide range of challenging and interesting questions beyond the confines of the school curriculum.

Entering an essay in our competition can build knowledge, and refine skills of argumentation. It also gives students the chance to have their work assessed by experts. All of our essay prizes are judged by a panel of senior academics drawn from leading universities including Oxford and Princeton, under the leadership of the Chairman of Examiners, former Cambridge philosopher, Dr Jamie Whyte.

The judges will choose their favourite essay from each of seven subject categories - Philosophy, Politics, Economics, History, Psychology, Theology and Law - and then select the winner of the Grand Prize for the best entry in any subject. There is also a separate prize awarded for the best essay in the junior category, for under 15s.

Q1. Do we have any good reasons to trust our moral intuition?

Q2. Do girls have a (moral) right to compete in sporting contests that exclude boys?

Q3. Should I be held responsible for what I believe?

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Q1. Is there such a thing as too much democracy?

Q2. Is peace in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip possible?

Q3. When is compliance complicity?

Q1. What is the optimal global population?  

Q2. Accurate news reporting is a public good. Does it follow that news agencies should be funded from taxation?

Q3. Do successful business people benefit others when making their money, when spending it, both, or neither?

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Q1. Why was sustained economic growth so rare before the later 18th century and why did this change?

Q2. Has music ever significantly changed the course of history?

Q3. Why do civilisations collapse? Is our civilisation in danger?

Q1. When, if ever, should a company be permitted to refuse to do business with a person because of that person’s public statements?

Q2. In the last five years British police have arrested several thousand people for things they posted on social media. Is the UK becoming a police state?

Q3. Your parents say that 11pm is your bedtime. But they don’t punish you if you don’t go to bed by 11pm. Is 11pm really your bedtime?

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Q1. According to a study by researchers at four British universities, for each 15-point increase in IQ, the likelihood of getting married increases by around 35% for a man but decreases by around 58% for a woman. Why?

In the original version of this question we misstated a statistic. This was caused by reproducing an error that appeared in several media summaries of the study. We are grateful to one of our contestants, Xinyi Zhang, who helped us to see (with humility and courtesy) why we should take more care to check our sources. We corrected the text on 4 April. Happily, the correction does not in any way alter the thrust of the question.

Q2. There is an unprecedented epidemic of depression and anxiety among young people. Can we fix this? How?

Q3. What is the difference between a psychiatric illness and a character flaw?

Q1. “I am not religious, but I am spiritual.” What could the speaker mean by “spiritual”?

Q2. Is it reasonable to thank God for protection from some natural harm if He is responsible for causing the harm?

Q3. Does God reward those who believe in him? If so, why?

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JUNIOR prize

Q1. Does winning a free and fair election automatically confer a mandate for governing?

Q2. Has the anti-racism movement reduced racism?

Q3. Is there life after death?

Q4. How did it happen that governments came to own and run most high schools, while leaving food production to private enterprise? 

Q5. When will advancing technology make most of us unemployable? What should we do about this?

Q6. Should we trust fourteen-year-olds to make decisions about their own bodies? 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS & FURTHER DETAILS

Please read the following carefully.

Entry to the John Locke Institute Essay Competition 2024 is open to students from any country.

Registration  

Only candidates who registered before the registration deadline of Friday, 31 May 2024 may enter this year's competition.

All entries must be submitted by 11.59 pm BST on  the submission deadline: Sunday, 30 June 2024 .  Candidates must be eighteen years old, or younger, on that date. (Candidates for the Junior Prize must be fourteen years old, or younger, on that date.)

Entry is free.

Each essay must address only one of the questions in your chosen subject category, and must not exceed 2000 words (not counting diagrams, tables of data, endnotes, bibliography or authorship declaration). 

The filename of your pdf must be in this format: FirstName-LastName-Category-QuestionNumber.pdf; so, for instance, Alexander Popham would submit his answer to question 2 in the Psychology category with the following file name:

Alexander-Popham-Psychology-2.pdf

Essays with filenames which are not in this format will be rejected.

The candidate's name should NOT appear within the document itself. 

Candidates should NOT add footnotes. They may, however, add endnotes and/or a Bibliography that is clearly titled as such.

Each candidate will be required to provide the email address of an academic referee who is familiar with the candidate's written academic work. This should be a school teacher, if possible, or another responsible adult who is not a relation of the candidate. The John Locke Institute will email referees to verify that the essays submitted are indeed the original work of the candidates.

Submissions may be made as soon as registration opens in April. We recommend that you submit your essay well in advance of the deadline to avoid any last-minute complications.  To submit your essay, click here .  

Acceptance of your essay depends on your granting us permission to use your data for the purposes of receiving and processing your entry as well as communicating with you about the Awards Ceremony Dinner, the academic conference, and other events and programmes of the John Locke Institute and its associated entities.  

Late entries

If for any reason you miss the 30 June deadline you will have an opportunity to make a late entry, under two conditions:

a) A late entry fee of 20.00 USD must be paid by credit card within twenty-four hours of the original deadline; and

b) Your essay must be submitted  before 11.59 pm BST on Wednesday, 10 July 2024.

To pay for late entry, a registrant need only log into his or her account, select the relevant option and provide the requested payment information.

Our grading system is proprietary. Essayists may be asked to discuss their entry with a member of the John Locke Institute’s faculty. We use various means to identify plagiarism, contract cheating, the use of AI and other forms of fraud . Our determinations in all such matters are final.

Essays will be judged on knowledge and understanding of the relevant material, the competent use of evidence, quality of argumentation, originality, structure, writing style and persuasive force. The very best essays are likely to be those which would be capable of changing somebody's mind. Essays which ignore or fail to address the strongest objections and counter-arguments are unlikely to be successful .

Candidates are advised to answer the question as precisely and directly as possible.

The writers of the best essays will receive a commendation and be shortlisted for a prize. Writers of shortlisted essays will be notified by 11.59 pm BST on Wednesday, 31 July. They will also be invited to London for an invitation-only academic conference and awards dinner in September, where the prize-winners will be announced. Unlike the competition itself, the academic conference and awards dinner are not free. Please be aware that n obody is required to attend either the academic conference or the prize ceremony. You can win a prize without travelling to London.

All short-listed candidates, including prize-winners, will be able to download eCertificates that acknowledge their achievement. If you win First, Second or Third Prize, and you travel to London for the ceremony, you will receive a signed certificate. 

There is a prize for the best essay in each category. The prize for each winner of a subject category, and the winner of the Junior category, is a scholarship worth US$2000 towards the cost of attending any John Locke Institute programme, and the essays will be published on the Institute's website. Prize-giving ceremonies will take place in London, at which winners and runners-up will be able to meet some of the judges and other faculty members of the John Locke Institute. Family, friends, and teachers are also welcome.

The candidate who submits the best essay overall will be awarded an honorary John Locke Institute Junior Fellowship, which comes with a US$10,000 scholarship to attend one or more of our summer schools and/or visiting scholars programmes. 

The judges' decisions are final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

R egistration opens: 1 April, 2024.

Registration deadline: 31 May, 2024. (Registration is required by this date for subsequent submission.)

Submission deadline: 30 June, 2024.

Late entry deadline: 10 July, 2024. (Late entries are subject to a 20.00 USD charge, payable by 1 July.)

Notification of short-listed essayists: 31 July, 2024.

Academic conference: 20 - 22 September, 2024.

Awards dinner: 21 September, 2024.

Any queries regarding the essay competition should be sent to [email protected] . Please be aware that, due to the large volume of correspondence we receive, we cannot guarantee to answer every query. In particular, regrettably, we are unable to respond to questions whose answers can be found on our website.

If you would like to receive helpful tips  from our examiners about what makes for a winning essay or reminders of upcoming key dates for the 2024  essay competition, please provide your email here to be added to our contact list. .

Thanks for subscribing!

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The John Locke Institute's Global Essay Prize is acknowledged as the world's most prestigious essay competition. 

We welcome tens of thousands of submissions from ambitious students in more than 150 countries, and our examiners - including distinguished philosophers, political scientists, economists, historians, psychologists, theologians, and legal scholars - read and carefully assess every entry. 

I encourage you to register for this competition, not only for the hope of winning a prize or commendation, and not only for the chance to join the very best contestants at our academic conference and gala ceremony in London, but equally for the opportunity to engage in the serious scholarly enterprise of researching, reflecting on, writing about, and editing an answer to one of the important and provocative questions in this year's Global Essay Prize. 

We believe that the skills you will acquire in the process will make you a better thinker and a more effective advocate for the ideas that matter most to you.

I hope to see you in September!

Best wishes,

Jamie Whyte, Ph.D. (C ANTAB ) 

Chairman of Examiners

Q. I missed the registration deadline. May I still register or submit an essay?

A. No. Only candidates who registered before 31 May will be able to submit an essay. 

Q. Are footnote s, endnotes, a bibliography or references counted towards the word limit?

A. No. Only the body of the essay is counted. 

Q. Are in-text citations counted towards the word limit? ​

A. If you are using an in-text based referencing format, such as APA, your in-text citations are included in the word limit.

Q. Is it necessary to include foo tnotes or endnotes in an essay? ​

A. You  may not  include footnotes, but you may include in-text citations or endnotes. You should give your sources of any factual claims you make, and you should ackn owledge any other authors on whom you rely.​

Q. I am interested in a question that seems ambiguous. How should I interpret it?

A. You may interpret a question as you deem appropriate, clarifying your interpretation if necessary. Having done so, you must answer the question as directly as possible.

Q. How strict are  the age eligibility criteria?

A. Only students whose nineteenth birthday falls after 30 June 2024 will be eligible for a prize or a commendation. In the case of the Junior category, only students whose fifteenth birthday falls after 30 June 2024 will be eligible for a prize or a commendation. 

Q. May I submit more than one essay?

A. Yes, you may submit as many essays as you please in any or all categories.

Q. If I am eligible to compete in the Junior category, may I also (or instead) compete in another category?

A. Yes, you may.

Q. May I team up with someone else to write an essay?  

A. No. Each submitted essay must be entirely the work of a single individual.

Q. May I use AI, such as ChatGPT or the like, in writing my essay?

A. All essays will be checked for the use of AI. If we find that any content is generated by AI, your essay will be disqualified. We will also ask you, upon submission of your essay, whether you used AI for  any  purpose related to the writing of your essay, and if so, you will be required to provide details. In that case, if, in our judgement, you have not provided full and accurate details of your use of AI, your essay will be disqualified. 

Since any use of AI (that does not result in disqualification) can only negatively affect our assessment of your work relative to that of work that is done without using AI, your safest course of action is simply not to use it at all. If, however, you choose to use it for any purpose, we reserve the right to make relevant judgements on a case-by-case basis and we will not enter into any correspondence. 

Q. May I have someone else edit, or otherwise help me with, my essay?

A. You may of course discuss your essay with others, and it is perfectly acceptable for them to offer general advice and point out errors or weaknesses in your writing or content, leaving you to address them.

However, no part of your essay may be written by anyone else. This means that you must edit your own work and that while a proofreader may point out errors, you as the essayist must be the one to correct them. 

Q. Do I have to attend the awards ceremony to win a prize? ​

A. Nobody is required to attend the prize ceremony. You can win a prize without travelling to London. But if we invite you to London it is because your essay was good enough - in the opinion of the First Round judges - to be at least a contender for First, Second or Third Prize. Normally the Second Round judges will agree that the short-listed essays are worth at least a commendation.

Q. Is there an entry fee?

A. No. There is no charge to enter our global essay competition unless you submit your essay after the normal deadline, in which case there is a fee of 20.00 USD .

Q. Can I receive a certificate for my participation in your essay competition if I wasn't shortlisted? 

A. No. Certificates are awarded only for shortlisted essays. Short-listed contestants who attend the award ceremony in London will receive a paper certificate. If you cannot travel to London, you will be able to download your eCertificate.

Q. Can I receive feedba ck on my essay? 

A. We would love to be able to give individual feedback on essays but, unfortunately, we receive too many entries to be able to comment on particular essays.

Q. The deadline for publishing the names of short-listed essayists has passed but I did not receive an email to tell me whether I was short-listed.

A. Log into your account and check "Shortlist Status" for (each of) your essay(s).

Q. Why isn't the awards ceremony in Oxford this year?

A. Last year, many shortlisted finalists who applied to join our invitation-only academic conference missed the opportunity because of capacity constraints at Oxford's largest venues. This year, the conference will be held in central London and the gala awards dinner will take place in an iconic London ballroom. 

TECHNICAL FAQ s

Q. The system will not accept my essay. I have checked the filename and it has the correct format. What should I do?  

A. You have almost certainly added a space before or after one of your names in your profile. Edit it accordingly and try to submit again.

Q. The profile page shows my birth date to be wrong by a day, even after I edit it. What should I do?

A. Ignore it. The date that you typed has been correctly input to our database. ​ ​

Q. How can I be sure that my registration for the essay competition was successful? Will I receive a confirmation email?

A. You will not receive a confirmation email. Rather, you can at any time log in to the account that you created and see that your registration details are present and correct.

TROUBLESHOOTING YOUR SUBMISSION

If you are unable to submit your essay to the John Locke Institute’s global essay competition, your problem is almost certainly one of the following.

If so, please proceed as indicated.

1) PROBLEM: I receive the ‘registrations are now closed’ message when I enter my email and verification code. SOLUTION. You did not register for the essay competition and create your account. If you think you did, you probably only provided us with your email to receive updates from us about the competition or otherwise. You may not enter the competition this year.

2) PROBLEM I do not receive a login code after I enter my email to enter my account. SOLUTION. Enter your email address again, checking that you do so correctly. If this fails, restart your browser using an incognito window; clear your cache, and try again. Wait for a few minutes for the code. If this still fails, restart your machine and try one more time. If this still fails, send an email to [email protected] with “No verification code – [your name]” in the subject line.

SUBMITTING AN ESSAY

3) PROBLEM: The filename of my essay is in the correct format but it is rejected. SOLUTION: Use “Edit Profile” to check that you did not add a space before or after either of your names. If you did, delete it. Whether you did or did not, try again to submit your essay. If submission fails again, email [email protected] with “Filename format – [your name]” in the subject line.

4) PROBLEM: When trying to view my submitted essay, a .txt file is downloaded – not the .pdf file that I submitted. SOLUTION: Delete the essay. Logout of your account; log back in, and resubmit. If resubmission fails, email [email protected] with “File extension problem – [your name]” in the subject line.

5) PROBLEM: When I try to submit, the submission form just reloads without giving me an error message. SOLUTION. Log out of your account. Open a new browser; clear the cache; log back in, and resubmit. If resubmission fails, email [email protected] with “Submission form problem – [your name]” in the subject line.

6) PROBLEM: I receive an “Unexpected Error” when trying to submit. SOLUTION. Logout of your account; log back in, and resubmit. If this resubmission fails, email [email protected] with “Unexpected error – [your name]” in thesubject line. Your email must tell us e xactly where in the submission process you received this error.

7) PROBLEM: I have a problem with submitting and it is not addressed above on this list. SOLUTION: Restart your machine. Clear your browser’s cache. Try to submit again. If this fails, email [email protected] with “Unlisted problem – [your name]” in the subject line. Your email must tell us exactly the nature of your problem with relevant screen caps.

READ THIS BEFORE YOU EMAIL US.

Do not email us before you have tried the specified solutions to your problem.

Do not email us more than once about a single problem. We will respond to your email within 72 hours. Only if you have not heard from us in that time may you contact us again to ask for an update.

If you email us regarding a problem, you must include relevant screen-shots and information on both your operating system and your browser. You must also declare that you have tried the solutions presented above and had a good connection to the internet when you did so.

If you have tried the relevant solution to your problem outlined above, have emailed us, and are still unable to submit before the 30 June deadline on account of any fault of the John Locke Institute or our systems, please do not worry: we will have a way to accept your essay in that case. However, if there is no fault on our side, we will not accept your essay if it is not submitted on time – whatever your reason: we will not make exceptions for IT issues for which we are not responsible.

We reserve the right to disqualify the entries of essayists who do not follow all provided instructions, including those concerning technical matters.

Royal Commonwealth Society.png

MEET THE WINNERS OF THE QUEEN'S COMMONWEALTH ESSAY COMPETITION 2022

The Queen's Commonwealth Essay Competition (QCEC) is the world's oldest international schools' writing contest, established by the Society in 1883. With thousands of young people taking part each year, it is an important way to recognise achievement, elevate youth voices and develop key skills through creative writing. 

Each year, entrants write on a theme that explores the Commonwealth's values, fostering an empathetic world view in the next generation of leaders and encouraging young people to consider new perspectives to the challenges that the world faces. Themes have included the environment, community, inclusion, the role of youth leadership, and gender equality. 

In the past decade alone, this high-profile competition has engaged approximately 140,000 young people, over 5,000 schools and thousands of volunteer judges across the Commonwealth. 

This year, the competition theme was 'Our Commonwealth', reflecting on our Patron Queen Elizabeth II's seven decades of service to the Commonwealth as an inspiring example of the steadfast commitment and important contribution we can all make to our societies.

We were thrilled to receive a record-breaking 26,322 entries to the QCEC from every Commonwealth region, with the winners and runners-up from New Zealand, Australia, the United Kingdom and India. Find out more about this year's winners below and watch their reactions on discovering this significant achievement!

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Sawooly Li 

Senior Winner 

Age 17, New Zealand 

Sawooly Li is a 12th grade student from Rangitoto College in New Zealand. Reading and writing have always been second nature for her—a way of expressing visions, thoughts, and emotions. She loves drawing inspiration and learning from other great writers and their works. Both reading and writing are things which Sawooly aspires to continue far, far, into the future.

Sawooly also has a love for maths and physics, and is heavily involved in such areas in her school, running clubs and participating in competitions. Fostering a strong sense of community, she also leads several in-school organisations, such as UN Youth and UNICEF. In the winters, Sawooly enjoys snowboarding in New Zealand’s beautiful mountains with friends and family.

Read Sawooly's winning entry, 'Willow Trees and Waterholes' .

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Madeleine Wood

Junior Winner 

Age 14, Australia 

Madeleine is 14 years old and lives in Melbourne, Australia. She is in grade 8 at Camberwell Girls Grammar School.

She loves travelling, particularly through Europe, and enjoys visiting the museums, historical landmarks and cities in each country. It is from these experiences that she gained a love for ancient, medieval, and renaissance history.

She is also an avid reader, plays the violin and spends much of her time playing basketball or swimming.

Read her winning poem, 'Catalina' .

Amaal pic.jpg

Amaal Fawzi

Senior Runner-up

Age 17, United Kingdom

Amaal Fawzi is a 17-year-old girl who was born in Egypt, raised in Lebanon, and now lives in East London. She has an Iraqi father and a British mother, and because of the education system in Lebanon, she has started university a year early! She studies English Literature with Creative Writing and has been writing poetry for many years, though she wouldn’t say she’s been writing poetry well for all of them.

Most of the poetry and prose she likes to write is concerned with culture and identity. Her years in Lebanon formed the majority of her character and cultural experiences, so learning to interact with that in the UK has been a very interesting season. It makes for a lot of writing material, and she’d say that the way she writes is always personal and drawn somehow from her own life.

Read Amaal's poem, 'Nursing Homes' . 

Pic.jpg

Maulika Pandey

Junior  Runner-up

Age 13, India

Maulika Pandey, is an 8th grade student from Aurum the Global School.

She has always enjoyed writing since she was a child as she feels writing gives her the power to express her feelings in a creative way. Maulika also enjoys sketching and playing the guitar. Basketball is her favourite sport.

She aspires to be a successful entrepreneur but will definitely continue writing in the future.

She is a dedicated advocate for anti-bullying and body positivity.

Read her entry titled, 'The Molai Forest' .

Fitzcarraldo Editions

The Fitzcarraldo Editions Essay Prize

The Fitzcarraldo Editions/Mahler & LeWitt Studios Essay Prize is an annual competition for unpublished writers. Initially made possible by an Arts Council Grant in 2015, the prize awards £3,000 to the best proposal for a book-length essay (minimum 25,000 words) by a writer resident in the UK & Ireland who has yet to secure a publishing deal. In addition to the £3,000 prize the winner will have the opportunity to spend up to two months in residency at the Mahler & LeWitt Studios in Spoleto, Italy, to work on their book. The book will then be published by Fitzcarraldo Editions.

Read more about the prize and entry requirements here

Previous winners

essay prize 2022

2024 Essay Prize Winner Lucy Mercer

essay prize 2022

2023 Essay Prize Winner Ghalya Saadawi

essay prize 2022

2022 Essay Prize Winner Marianne Brooker

essay prize 2022

2021 Essay Prize Winner Heather McCalden

essay prize 2022

2020 Essay Prize Winner Thea Lenarduzzi

essay prize 2022

2019 Essay Prize Winner Polly Barton

essay prize 2022

2018 Essay Prize Winner Joanna Pocock

essay prize 2022

2016 Essay Prize Winner Matthew McNaught

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  • Architecture Competitions

Avani Essay Prize 2022

Avani Essay Prize 2022 - Image 1 of 1

  • Published on September 02, 2022

Communities have always thrived and sustained themselves through innovative collaborations with their environment and individuals that surround them. These have often been responses to diverse needs, ranging from celebrations to contestations, formal to informal associations or progressive development to building capacity and resilience. Agency that the communities gain through such associations empower them to translate their needs to tangible and intangible solutions, each unique to the problem, place and time. Architecture can thus be identified as a tangible solution to community needs that emanate out of a collaborative alliance.

The submitted essay should reflect on how collaborative architecture can be a tangible solution to attain good and functional design that enables diversity and inclusion. How do architects reimagine/reframe processes to design for and with communities? What are the possibilities for design interventions that would involve inter-disciplinary collaborations for community infrastructures?

Participants are required to produce an essay of about 2000-2500 words (all inclusive) that answers the above enquiries through a clear and cohesive piece of writing. The essay should include cited examples along with a maximum of three photographs to substantiate the premise.

The entry should be an original contribution of the author/s. Collaborative writing is encouraged but restricted to not more than two members. Multiple entries are discouraged. The format should include the title and the author/s name.

Submission Format - .doc/.docx

Who can write? We invite full-time registered undergraduate students of Architecture, Planning and Design from around the world to participate in the Avani Essay Prize 2022.

Submission Deadline: Sunday, 18 September 2022 Announcement of Results: Sunday, 02 October 2022

Send your essays with a short bio of not more than 150 words to [email protected]

Prize - Rs. 10,000/- and Publication in National Journal

Submission Deadline

Download the information related to this competition here.

This competition was submitted by an ArchDaily user. If you'd like to submit a competition, call for submissions or other architectural 'opportunity' please use our "Submit a Competition" form. The views expressed in announcements submitted by ArchDaily users do not necessarily reflect the views of ArchDaily.

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  • Centre for Reproductive Research & Communication
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Winners of the 2022 Heather Trickey Essay Prize announced.

26 January 2023

The judges of the Heather Trickey Essay Prize are delighted to announce the results of our 2022 award. Our joint winners are  The Pelvic Partnership  and  Angeline O’Connor , writing on the subject of pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy.

The prize seeks to build on the work of Dr Trickey, who died in July 2021 and who was involved in designing the award. It encourages work that aims to find common ground and practical responses in sometimes difficult areas of women’s reproductive health and rights. We were also looking for essays that spoke to a underexplored or contested area, sought to surface women’s voices and experiences, and suggested fresh solutions.

We chose these two essays, as we felt they absolutely articulated these key themes.

Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain is a very common and recognised condition, yet its debilitating impact on women during and after pregnancy seems to remain completely unappreciated. We felt this was an area of significant unmet need which deserves reappraisal, with a particular focus on developing an evidence base on what works to underpin more reponsive and consistent services for women.

We will support The Pelvic Partnership and Angeline to take their ideas forward.

Alongside these essays, we are also publishing two highly commended submissions.

Emillie Belmore’s essay explores the impact of sexual violence on female reproductive health, specifically looking to overcome gaps in previous research which has tended to focus only on psychological effects.

Katherine Butcher brings a unique perspective to her discussion of law reform in the complex and contested area of fetal death due to third party recklessness.

We know Heather would have been thrilled at the diversity of issues covered this year, and all of the authors’ demonstrable commitment to improving experiences and outcomes for women.

We are hugely grateful to everyone who took part and look forward to opening the award again next year.

For further information, please contact Katherine O’Brien, BPAS Associate Director of Campaigns and Communications, on katherine.o’[email protected] or 07881 265276.

The British Pregnancy Advisory Service, BPAS, is a charity that sees over 100,000 women a year for reproductive healthcare services including pregnancy counselling, abortion care, miscarriage management and contraception at clinics across Great Britain.

BPAS exists to further women’s reproductive choices. We believe all women should have the right to make their own decisions in and around pregnancy, from the contraception they use to avoid pregnancy right the way through to how they decide to feed their newborn baby, with access to evidence-based information to underpin their choices and high-quality services and support to exercise them. 

BPAS also runs the Centre for Reproductive Research and Communication, CRRC. Through rigorous multidisciplinary research and impactful communication, the CRRC aims to inform policy, practice, and public discourse. You can find out more  here .

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News | Oxford reclaims Fox-Powell Trophy in annual golf match

Oxford reclaims Fox-Powell Trophy in annual golf match

The annual golf match between the academic golfers and senior managers of Oxford and Cambridge universities concluded with Oxford securing a 7:5 victory.

Oriel College’s Master of Works, Colin Bailey, who has captained the Oxford team since 2016, led the team to success, supported by Oriel Lodge Manager, Samuel Henry and other players from the University of Oxford, its colleges and the University Hospital Trust. This event, held since 1980, awards the winning team the Fox-Powell Trophy, engraved each year to mark the competition’s history.

The match, held at the Aspley Guise & Woburn Sands Golf Club, follows a 27-hole Ryder Cup match play format with 12 players per team. Oxford has frequently held the trophy since 2015, with the exception of 2020, when the event was cancelled due to COVID. Oxford emerged victorious in 2021, while Cambridge claimed the title in 2022 and 2023. This year’s win marks the 28th time Oxford has held the trophy, with the event ending in a tie on seven occasions.

The match has been played on neutral ground at Aspley Guise & Woburn Sands Golf Club for the past decade, transitioning from its previous home and away format.

The life and philanthropy of Hoi Tung, one of Oriel College’s most generous benefactors

Former captain awarded michael johnson rugby shield for “continued dedication to the club”, commander of uk space command speaks about space and security at oriel college.

Berkeley Prize

THE ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL BERKELEY UNDERGRADUATE PRIZE FOR ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN EXCELLENCE

The Berkeley Prize has been suspended for the 2023-2024 academic year.

Explore the past 25 years of the Prize through the pages below.

About the prize.

Raymond Lifchez

The international Berkeley Undergraduate Prize for Architectural Design Excellence (BERKELEY PRIZE) was founded by Raymond Lifchez , Emeritus Professor of Architecture and City & Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design (CED), through the result of a generous gift to the CED's Department of Architecture by the late Judith Lee Stronach.

Student Participants

Awards granted, individual winners, berkeley prize through the years.

essay prize 2022

Question To Past Winners: How do you think the Prize has influenced your professional life as an architect or in any other profession or career pursuit?

Benard Acellam, Assistant Architect at DE-ZYN FORUM LTD; Assistant Lecturer in Architecture at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; BP Essay Prize Winner, 2015.

essay prize 2022

Essay Prize

Each year, the PRIZE Committee selects a topic critical to the investigation of the social art of architecture and poses a Question based on that topic. Full-time undergraduate students in an architecture degree program or majoring in architecture in accredited schools of architecture throughout the world, including Diploma in Architecture students, may submit a 500-word essay proposal responding to the Question. Entries by teams of two students are encouraged and the second team member can be an undergraduate studying in fields related to architecture.

Philipp Goertz, Graduate Student at RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany; BP Travel Fellow, 2018

essay prize 2022

Travel Fellowship

Semifinalists who select this option are invited to submit proposals demonstrating how they would use the opportunity to travel to an architecturally-significant destination of their choosing, preferably to participate in a hands-on service-oriented situation. This is an exciting opportunity to explore a different part of the world and to participate in an organized project that will assist the winner in gaining a deeper understanding of the social art of architecture.

Past Fellowships

Community service fellowship competition.

Semifinalists who select to compete for a Community Service Fellowship are invited to submit proposals demonstrating how they would use the opportunity to initiate a program or join an on-going program that reflects the content of their Essay proposals. This is an exciting opportunity to explore how to start and/or to participate in an organized project that will assist in the overall understanding and application of the social art of architecture.

Architectural Design Fellowship

From 2008 to 2011 the BERKELEY PRIZE Committee offered students the opportunity to compete in the Architectural Design Fellowship Competition to foster the study of the social art of architecture by helping to sponsor local and regional architectural student design competitions that were run by students themselves. This competition challenged the candidates to produce a thorough and practical proposal for a design competition that would benefit their community and bring attention to the resources available to the community from their school.

Teaching Fellowship

From 2013 to 2014 a new BERKELEY PRIZE Teaching Fellowship was offered to undergraduate architecture studio design faculty from around the world. The primary goal of this Fellowship was to support innovative thinking by faculty as they work to focus their students' attention on the social, behavioral, and physical characteristics of the users of the buildings and spaces being designed.

Each year the Berkeley Prize Committee invites a distinguished professor or scholar in the field of architecture or the related social sciences to write about some aspect of the year's Berkeley Prize topic.

  • They are meant to help focus students' thoughts on the issues surrounding the year's Question.
  • They are a model for excellence in writing.
  • They exhibit both how defined and how broad the range of possible response to a Question.

The social art of architecture encompasses a large field of inquiry that links design studies to people studies. In an ever-growing corpus of published work, researchers from a variety of disciplines work with architects to investigate how to make architecture better for all people. The various topics of the history of the BERKELEY PRIZE give a glimpse into the range of these studies. Each year, the PRIZE publishes "resources" to help participants further understand the specific topics. Included in The LIbrary is a selection of these resources as well as other articles and links that detail why architecture is and must be, first and foremost, about people.

Committee Members

Click on the individual photos to see the member's full profile.

Benard Acellam

Elaine Addison

Andrew Amara

Sangeeta Bagga

Erick Bernabe

Aleksis Bertoni

Paul Broches

Himanshu Burte

Thea Chroman

Benjamin Clavan

Roddy Creedon

Howard Davis

Charles Debbas

Lynne Elizabeth

Teddy Forscher

Dorit Fromm

Thomas Gensheimer

Ann Gilkerson

Alex Gonzalez

Nicole Graycar

Zachary Heiden

Ocean Howell

Neelakshi Joshi

Rachel Kallus

Daniel Karlin

Thomas-Bernard Kenniff

Barbara Knecht

Aboubacar Komara

Scott Koniecko

Malini Krishnankutty

Raymond Lifchez

Ian Mactavish

Christine Macy

Padma Maitland

John Q McDonald

Jason Miller

Anusha Narayanan

Maire O'Neill Conrad

John Parman

Helaine Kaplan Prentice

Ushna Raees

Clare Robinson

Daves Rossell

David Salazar

Magdalena Saura

Corey Schnobrich

Anthony Schuman

Murray Silverstein

Avikal Somvanshi

Preeti Talwai

Philip Tidwell

Robert Ungar

Leslie Van Duzer

Jan Wampler

Matt Werner

Cynthia Whitehead

Keith Wilson

Friedner Wittman

Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi

Ghina Kanawati, Architect and Researcher at CatalyticAction, Beirut, Lebanon; BP Essay Winner, 2018

essay prize 2022

Berkeley Prize In The News

Conversations on social justice and design.

The College of Environmental Design and the Department of Architecture hosted a day-long symposium in April 2022 titled Conversations on Social Justice and Design , to honor Professor Emeritus Raymond Lifchez, Founder and Chair of the BERKELEY PRIZE. The symposium featured a spectacular list of speakers who have been instrumental leaders in shaping contemporary practices addressing social justice, particularly in universal design.

Speakers included Darren Walker, Maddy Burke-Vigeland, Jeffrey Mansfield, Elaine Ostroff, Valerie Fletcher, Victor Pineda, and Susan Schwelk with a keynote talk by Christopher Downey, our inaugural Lifchez Professor of Practice in Social Justice.

essay prize 2022

Conversations on Social Justice and Design Part I

essay prize 2022

Conversations in Social Justice and Design Part II

Conversations on Social Justice and Design Part II

essay prize 2022

Conversations on Social Justice and Design Part III

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James McBride poses with chin in hand. He's wearing a blue beret, blue turtleneck and gray sweater with a hoop earring in his left ear.

James McBride Awarded the 2024 Prize for American Fiction

July 11, 2024

Posted by: Wendi Maloney

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Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced this week that the Library is conferring the 2024 Prize for American Fiction on acclaimed author James McBride. He will accept the prize at the National Book Festival on Aug. 24.

One of the Library’s most presti­gious awards, the annual Prize for American Fiction honors a literary writer whose body of work is dis­tinguished not only for its mastery of the art, but also for its originality of thought and imagination.

“I’m honored to bestow the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction on a writer as imaginative and knowing as James McBride,” Hayden said. “McBride knows the American soul deeply, reflecting our struggles and triumphs in his fiction, which so many readers have intimately connected with. I, also, am one of his enthusiastic readers.”

The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that — throughout consistently accomplished careers — have told us something essential about the American experience.

“I wish my mom were still alive to know about this,” McBride said. “I’m delighted and honored. Does it mean I can use the Library? If so, I’m double thrilled.”

McBride is the author of the best­selling novel “Deacon King Kong”; “The Good Lord Bird,” winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction; “The Color of Water”; “Song Yet Sung”; the story collection “Five-Carat Soul”; and the James Brown biography “Kill ’Em and Leave.”

His debut novel, “Miracle at St. Anna,” was turned into a 2008 film. In 2016, McBride was awarded the National Humanities Medal.

He is also a musician, a com­poser and a current distinguished writer-in-residence at New York University.

McBride’s most recent bestsell­ing novel, “The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store,” received the 2023 Kirkus Prize for Fiction and was named Barnes and Noble’s 2023 Book of the Year.

The National Book Festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The theme is “Books Build Us Up.”

On Aug. 1, McBride will participate in a virtual interview with PBS Books as part of a series preview­ing 2024 festival authors.

McBride has appeared at multi­ple National Book Festivals in past years, most recently in 2020, when he spoke about his novel “Deacon King Kong.”

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PEN America

  • PEN America Free Expression Essay Competition

2024 Free Expression Essay Competition Winners

essay prize 2022

PEN America is excited to announce the winners of our third annual Free Expression Essay Competition . 

Over 200 high school and college students wrote in to tell us what free expression means to them, addressing a wide range of topics like protest rights, book bans, the history of free speech, and personal experiences with censorship. Student writers took to the page to explore challenging questions surrounding free expression, and put forth strong arguments for the necessity of free expression when it comes to curiosity, discovery, empathy, and human rights.

Congratulations to our winning students!

High School Division:

First Place: Janice – $1,500 prize

Janice explains how the recent book ban epidemic ignores constitutional law in the essay “Leave Your Liberty at the Door.”

Second Place: Ahlam! – $1,000 prize

Ahlam!’s essay describes the frequent censorship she has experienced throughout her scholastic career when she tries to talk about her Palestinian heritage.

Third Place: Ivana Kiage – $500 prize

Ivana Kiage’s essay examines some historical examples where the press has stood up for free expression and how in some recent cases it has not.

College Division:  

First Place: A.Y. – $2,000 prize

A.Y. offers a meditation on how recent outbreaks of xenophobia in the United States show that those who attempt to stifle free expression are always “on the wrong side of history” in the essay “Freedom of Speech as the Antidote to Silence: Telling the Good Side of History.”

Second Place: Rebecca Tilly Ross – $1,500 prize

Rebecca Tilly Ross describes the essential role freedom of speech plays in democratic societies in the essay “Why Does Free Expression Matter in Democracy?”

Third Place: Emilie Takahashi – $1,000 prize

Emilie Takahashi documents how the newspaper industry’s continuing decline is affecting college newspapers in the essay “Depleting an Oasis in a News Desert: The Erosion of Student Journalism.”

Special thanks to our judges, including PEN America’s Free Expression Programs staff and Ryan La Sala . Ryan La Sala is a bestselling award-winning author who writes about surreal things happening to queer people. His debut horror novel, The Honeys , is in development to become a major motion picture. His most recent release is the highly anticipated Beholder . He has been featured in The New York Times Book Review , Entertainment Weekly , NPR, and Tor.com, and one time Shangela from RuPaul’s Drag Race called him cute!

We also thank all who participated in this year’s essay competition, and implore all young writers and advocates to stay passionate about the human right to free expression in a world that increasingly seeks to shut expression down. 

PEN America is deeply grateful to the John Templeton Foundation for its generous support of PEN America’s National Student Free Expression Essay Competition.

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COMMENTS

  1. The 2022 Essay Prize Competition

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  9. Congratulations to the 2022 Senior Essay Prize Nominees and Winners!

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  13. CFP: Royal Institute of Philosophy 2022 Essay Prize

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  14. Berkeley Prize Essay Competition

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  27. 2024 Free Expression Essay Competition Winners

    2024 Free Expression Essay Competition Winners. PEN America is excited to announce the winners of our third annual Free Expression Essay Competition.. Over 200 high school and college students wrote in to tell us what free expression means to them, addressing a wide range of topics like protest rights, book bans, the history of free speech, and personal experiences with censorship.